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I have purchased the fuel injector hose & connector kit (hose, bushing, and clamps); I have two questions:



The workshop manual says to remove the injectors from the rail by cutting the pipe with a welder. I'm not trying to be obtuse, but it looks like they're cutting the hose with a soldering gun. Can you just cut the hose with shears, then slit the pieces lengthwise to remove them from the rail and injector? What's the preferred method?

Also the current injector hoses are approximately 55mm long; the new ones in the kit are about 43mm. Is this going to cause any problems?
Lost in translation. Soldering iron. You can also use a knife as long as you are careful not to cut into the nipple as you describe.

43mm seems short. I just looked at mine (which I cut to length myself from bulk hose), and they are close to the 55mm length of your old ones.
 

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For you young people. Soldering guns use to come with different tips. 2 of them were flat blades on the end. They were used mainly to melt plastic. The reason the shop manual tells you to use this is so you don't nick or scar the ridges on the nipples. They can cause leaking.

The hose size you want is 7.5 mm fuel injection line. If you use this size you don't need any clamps on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #463
I 3d printed my own clutch alignment tool. It worked great.

 

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For you young people. Soldering guns use to come with different tips. 2 of them were flat blades on the end. They were used mainly to melt plastic. The reason the shop manual tells you to use this is so you don't nick or scar the ridges on the nipples. They can cause leaking.

The hose size you want is 7.5 mm fuel injection line. If you use this size you don't need any clamps on them.
I sent my injectors out to be cleaned and they came back with nicks. :glare:
 

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Don't waste your money on having the pressure plate balanced. You would not notice the difference.
I had mine balanced to the flywheel when they lightened the flywheel, on my BMW. The Sachs PP failed in two years and it really irked me that I had to use an unbalanced PP after that. I also never noticed an issue and forgot about it fairly quickly. No vibration differences, etc.
 

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I sent my injectors out to be cleaned and they came back with nicks. :glare:
Which is why I remove the hose before sending them out.

While I expect people to do a job how I would do it. They rarely do.
 

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I sent my injectors out to be cleaned and they came back with nicks. :glare:
Did you remove the short hoses between the rail and the injectors to verify their condition before you sent out the entire assembly for cleaning? I wouldn't be too quick to condemn the injector service crew as it's possible the nipple barbs were already nicked by a previous owner or shop before you sent the unit out. Just sayin'....
 

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If the nicks are very slight, no need to do anything. Or, install hose clamps. Or, find another set of injectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #470
I 3d printed a bushing for my VVT solenoid using TPU:



I never was able to get the big nut loose from the housing, so the 3d-printed bushing simply replaced the original rubber. You'll notice the vice-grip marks on the solenoid housing.

I drove everything home using a large socket and rubber mallet; the flexible material made for a nice compression fit. Once everything was aligned and working correctly, I have 3mm of material showing at the front. I'll monitor its position to ensure it is secure. If it shows evidence of shifting, I'll reinstall it with epoxy.
 

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Discussion Starter #471
I am literally ready to drop the engine back into the Alfa. I am genuinely concerned that I haven't yet found a home for my mystery bolt:

Post #415 Mystery Bolt

I've been quite diligent during re-assembly, and haven't found any unoccupied holes. The aluminum washer on the bolt looks as if it is sealing against a fluid, but I cannot find any place on the head, block, or oil pans that has a vacant opening.

There is the possibility that this came from my wife's '76 Super Beetle; I had to remove several engine components to replace her alternator a few weeks ago. However, there also, I have no vacancies for this bolt.

It's starting to haunt my dreams!
 

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Discussion Starter #473 (Edited)
View attachment 1497241 Maybe this it, to the right of the oil return cover. For some reason, posting a picture via the phone rotates it 180 degrees.
I think we have a winner! I looked under the flywheel, and sure enough, there's a hole with no bolt in it! I somehow missed it during that stage of reassembly, and then it was obscured by the flywheel. Of course, the bolt is too long to simply slide in underneath the flywheel and tighten...so the whole flywheel has to come off.

At least I can sleep peacefully tonight!

On another note, my engine block is the style without that cover plate that bolts on above the main seal. What's the difference?
 

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Interesting. When I spun my recently assembled 2L for the first time (no plugs) I was shocked to see oil flowing out of the bell housing. So much do that I thought I'd forgotten the main seal. When I pulled the flywheel off the seal was intact but the "mystery plug" was missing. The hole was threaded and I figured someone had drilled out the aluminum plug to clean the oil passage and then tapped it to put a threaded plug back in. Now I'm thinking that was the factory setup for the newer blocks. I'm guessing this changed with the switch to Bosch FI - my SPICA and carbed blocks just have aluminum plugs pounded into the hole.
 

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from the layout of your engine, it looks like that is a cap on the main oil gallery. Probably has the plug so the factory can clear out the oil gallery. The threaded plug is then obvious.

Robert
 

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When I pulled the flywheel off the seal was intact but the "mystery plug" was missing. The hole was threaded and I figured someone had drilled out the aluminum plug to clean the oil passage and then tapped it to put a threaded plug back in. Now I'm thinking that was the factory setup for the newer blocks. I'm guessing this changed with the switch to Bosch FI - my SPICA and carbed blocks just have aluminum plugs pounded into the hole.
My car has a 2.0L block from a early 70s 115 car. It had an aluminum plug with no head at this location, but as informed by my Alfa specialist, that plug was actually threaded in place. On his advice, I drilled a small pilot hole in the center of the plug and used a quality screw extractor to remove that plug. I replaced it with a hex-bolt plug as discussed in this thread.
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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Glad you found it!
 

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Discussion Starter #478
I pulled the pressure plate and flywheel. I installed the 'mystery' bolt with a bit of sealant, torqued it down, then put everything back together.

I did a bit of a dry run this evening with the engine stand and engine hoist, to ensure I had everything ready. I had forgotten that I wanted to cut the heat shield off the exhaust downpipe, so I'll get that done tomorrow afternoon.

Then, everything should be ready to drop the engine back in the Alfa! I'm excited to get it back together.
 

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Glad you found it. The picture was taken of an Alfetta block (from Ed Prytherch, alfaparticle). My '82 Bosch block has the same, stamped cover. The original block that was in the '88 did not. Sounds like you are set for the install.
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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You dodged a fifty caliber bullet, whew!
 
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