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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:eek:Well I tried to install the engine and gearbox as a unit !!!!!!!!!!

I jacked up the back of the car, removed the tie bar and hired an enormous engine crane.

After about 2 hours frigging around trying to get the bloody thing in I gave up.

I convinced myself that you don't have to take out the engine to fit a new clutch - so the gearbox must go back in on its own.

I lowered the engine and box back onto the ground, disconnected the box and lowered the engine into the engine bay.

:)Within 10 minutes it was bolted in place. So simple and no mind-boggling tilt angles.

I then got myself a transmission dolly, strapped the box to the frame of the dolly, jacked her up and wheeled the whole lot forwards. By jacking, wheeling and tilting the dolly in small increments I suprised myself and got the tranny back connected to the engine within about 45 minutes.

I tightened up the bolts/studs/nuts and thought that had to be easier than fitting both at once.

The biggest problem was actually getting the box on the dolly in the limited space under the car.
 

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Steve,

That's the way I do the installation also. I used to lay under the car with the tranny on my chest, and struggle to lift the thing into place but last year I bought a transmission jack very similar to yours, and it works quite well.


:eek:Well I tried to install the engine and gearbox as a unit !!!!!!!!!!

I jacked up the back of the car, removed the tie bar and hired an enormous engine crane.

After about 2 hours frigging around trying to get the bloody thing in I gave up.

I convinced myself that you don't have to take out the engine to fit a new clutch - so the gearbox must go back in on its own.

I lowered the engine and box back onto the ground, disconnected the box and lowered the engine into the engine bay.

:)Within 10 minutes it was bolted in place. So simple and no mind-boggling tilt angles.

I then got myself a transmission dolly, strapped the box to the frame of the dolly, jacked her up and wheeled the whole lot forwards. By jacking, wheeling and tilting the dolly in small increments I suprised myself and got the tranny back connected to the engine within about 45 minutes.

I tightened up the bolts/studs/nuts and thought that had to be easier than fitting both at once.

The biggest problem was actually getting the box on the dolly in the limited space under the car.
 

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A tranny jack is indespensable when working under the car. I used mine when working on the rear susp, & exahust system. Harbor Freight had hydraulic trans jack on sale for $99.00. The hydraulic jack can be pumped from under the car, has a greater lift range than a floor jack, and has a tilting deck plate. They go on sale at Harbor Freight often.

Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices
 

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Did you move the 'lifting hook' forward on the head? It does take quite a steep angle to get it in. If you leave the lifting hook in the middle of the head it'll be difficult to get the assembly tilted far enough.
 

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I used to lay under the car with the tranny on my chest, and struggle to lift the thing into place but last year I bought a transmission jack
Mine still get bench pressed in as they have always been since as far back as I can remember, but these days I simply hire out one of the nephews/cousins/daughters fiance'/younger freinds for the price of a six pack or a pack of smokes.

Get everything all prepped, stuff cleared out of the way and ready, then send the kid under with the trans on his chest. (if I'm feeling gracious, I even let them roll under on a dolly, which isn't often onnaconna my garage floor is about as smooth as gravel and breaks as many dollies as I've purchased)

Crawl under with them to get a few fixtures started so it don't fall out, and it's good to go :D

I get it done cheap and hands on, they get to learn about something they'd never have oppertunity to with the vehicles they drive. (one just throws away modern little cars when they fail doesn't one?)
 

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I've done it both ways. Each has its' merits.
But I am still kicking myself for not buying a transmission jack years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As far as I'm concerned putting the engine and box in separately was far less stressful - admittedly I had to spend money to get the tranny jack, but I think it was worth it. The exercise might have taken a bit longer - but hey, what's the rush!

As Geezer says, I'll get more of money back doing the exhaust - and other unknown jobs in the future.

In my younger days I too have been known to manhandle the occasional gearbox into place - but unfortunately I am now far too decrepit to even contemplate such a task.
 

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... I used to lay under the car with the tranny on my chest, and struggle to lift the thing into place but last year I bought a transmission jack ..., and it works quite well.
The last time I was in that very same position was on a cold February weekend, many, many moons ago. After I completed the process, and the car was running great, I thought about it and decided that I could afford to pay a mechanic to work on my Spider. Now I'm thinking that the jack may not be a bad idea, especially if the club holds a quality set of tools.

Best regards,
 
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