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Hello all,

I have a 74 GTV 2000 currently under complete restoration. The shell was put on a rotisserie, media blast inside and out, new panels fitted etc. Time to focus on the engine.

When the cylinder liners were removed I noticed a large amount of electrolysis had taken place and a fair amount of the aluminum has disappeared. Not sure if this block is reusable.

What id like out of the motor is the strongest package for the street with the perhaps yearly track day.

I'm seeing Carrillo rods, JE pistons and all kinds of goodies etc etc but I must admit I don't know much about these engines and their full capabilities.

This question may start a big debate but I have a lot to focus on with the completion of the body so who in your opinion is an engine builder I can commission to build me an engine ? Money no object for the build, top quality components and put together properly.

Thank you for your input.
 

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You don't need to spend a lot on the bottom end for a track day car. My motor is based upon an unmodified short block that cost me $100 and I rev it to 7000 rpm regularly. There are several ways to skin a cat but here is how I did it http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-1966-up/304825-79-spider-dyno.html. I will have it back on the dyno, probably within the next 2 months. I will be surprised if it is making less than 180 HP now. The zero to 100 time is around 20 seconds. I built the engine myself but I got a lot of help from Richard Jemison - Alfar7 on the ABB.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Engine

Don`t discount your block or head until throughly cleaned several times with Zep Industrial purple cleaner and high pressure/steam. Then acid cleaned with alumabright or similar acid cleaner again with high pressure. Takes repeated cleanings to get past crud & corrosion.

You don`t need anything but std rods for a 7000 RPM motor, however it`s smart to have the #2 & #4 mains drilled for direct oiling.
 

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When the cylinder liners were removed I noticed a large amount of electrolysis had taken place and a fair amount of the aluminum has disappeared. Not sure if this block is reusable.
Your block is fine. You will be hard pressed to find a 40+ year old block without some corrosion in that area - you might find one with less, but finding one that's pristine will be tough.

I just smear some high temperature RTV on the base of the liners, and let that create the seal for the coolant. You should still install the skinny O rings in order to position the liners at the right height. But if the O rings don't seal on the pitted surface, the RTV will prevent coolant from leaking into the sump.
 
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