Alfa Romeo Forums banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
Hi, can I ask a favour? If you have any original V6 springs, is there any chance you could let me know what their lengths are? I've heard 475mm front and 335mm rear but these make no sense compared to the lengths of springs in a Spax lowering kit.
Thanks either way and good luck with the sales.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
All this talk of dying Alfa 164's can only mean one thing to me....i'm keeping mine. My wife wants a Miata. I don't want a Miata but if I find a decent one, automatic (she will not try to learn stick), without a brittle-cracker *** end, I may be forced to let the Alfa go. It runs well but the no-air is a killer with recent weather. I should look for some spare parts, timing and S belt bearings (mine are repacked and good but eventually...), maybe suspension all around but as it will cost more for a decent pain job than the car will get on the market, tough choices. There used to be outfits that would let you rent their space and paint your own car but I haven't seen one in a decade.
a local used dealer has a 91 in super shape (I posted that last month) and also a 83 Biturbo in really nice shape (very hard to find one without rusted fenders....wings for you Richard Bradford).
I have enough basic parts to keep me going for awhile, except noted bearings.
Goats, if you have front bumper squirters, let me know your $$$. I never use them but one nib is busted and looks dumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Pretty sure fender is a wing, Hood is a bonnet. Boot is trunk. Windscreen is windshield. Indicators are turn signals. Comes from watching Top Gear, I think,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,072 Posts
To be similar in reference order, US name to Brit name, should be: trunk is boot, windshield is windscreen, turn signals are indicators.

Wonder how they changed from country to country.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,874 Posts
Two peoples separated by a (not so) common language.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,072 Posts
And then there is Canada, OZ, NZ, GB, et al, each with their different takes on the terms and pronunciation of the English language. Everyone thinks it's amusing/fun when they visit the various/different "English speaking" countries. At least Alfa is still Alfa in all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
And then there is Canada, OZ, NZ, GB, et al, each with their different takes on the terms and pronunciation of the English language. Everyone thinks it's amusing/fun when they visit the various/different "English speaking" countries. At least Alfa is still Alfa in all.
The really interesting part about Canadian English is that it is truly bilingual: we are fluent in both proper English and American English. We have no standard English here. Add our metric measures to the mix and we can get quite confused by it all.

The principle advantage of English is its biggest flaw. It is perhaps the best language to use if you don't speak the local language accurately. Broken English is readily understood just as perfectly precise English can be very vague.

Exemplified perhaps by the use of the phrase "2x4"for a standard lumber dimension which is a 4x2 in the UK and not actually 2x4 in any unit of measure....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,072 Posts
Yup. 2x4, 6x6, etc, used to be just that, true dimensions. My father's house had true dimension lumber in it, built back in the 20's. When he remodeled, it made fitting parts of the house together interesting, pieces of lumber not matching well.

Pronunciations are sometimes really interesting. For instance, the first time we went to NZ, one day we were asked at breakfast, did we want some what sounded to us as "breed". We said, what? Breed, she said. Oh, you mean bread, we pronouncing it as "brehd" with the eh sound. Turns out the NZlanders don't seem to have the "eh" sound, at least to our ears.

Of course, then there are the bilingual countries, such as Canada. We were told one day by our Canadian boat partner, who was German, that actually there were more Germans in Canada than French speakers. He was pissed. Oh well. Makes it interesting and fun, although it adds to the cost for everything, having to print all in two languages. In the not too distant future, the US will be bilingual English and Spanish. It's that way in many areas now (hope the authorities don't make it official, though, just adding to cost and confusion). Although, in the Seattle area, we can hear many different languages every day. No biggie. So...my wife and I learned some Japanese, lol.

Anyway, Alfa is still Alfa in any language. And, evidently Goats is bailing from 164s, alas. But they do have the simpler GTV and roadster. Some days I think about doing the same, lol. Just keep the SS for a while and maybe Milano, and get a cherry Giulia Super for DD.
 
  • Like
Reactions: horsewidower

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
Actually Michael, a 2x4 piece of wood (exactly the same as a 4x2 piece of wood turned 90 degrees) is traditionally a direct unit of measure to the 2"x4" you mentioned in the same post. When dealing with metric measurements these tend to be quoted in mm for such things. Am I nit picking...? :unsure::D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,072 Posts
American 2x4s, or 4x2 if you wish, are actually 1 1/2 x3 1/5 for some reason. All the other sizes also have 1/2 inch removed (1/4 each side) from each dimension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
Not only that but North American 2x4 used to be 1 5/8 by 3 5/8. If you have old lumber and new lumber this can be a pain in the neck. Many, many moons ago when dimension lumber was not sent through a massive multiple planer a 2x4 was 2x4 minus the saw kerfs. This fact enabled me to persuade a negligent house inspector to pay up (his insurer paid of course). He failed to notice that the attic space clearly showed the underside of the roof decking as constructed of genuine 2x6 which was traditionally used for cribbing before plywood forming became available in the 1930's. The ceiling joists were similar. This very old and very good fir (another giveaway as to the likely age of this lumber) still had residue of the concrete remains after the formwork was stripped. In those days the used formwork was then used for the structure, usually the roof. Because I am an amateur carpenter I knew all this. The building inspector was also a carpenter and at least was ethical enough to admit I was right: one look at that lumber was clear evidence that the roof of this 1991 home could not have been built in 1991! Mind you, being under oath does tend to focus your mind on any remnants of ethics you might retain.

Turns out only the foundation up to the second floor was built in 1991 and then a 1920's era bungalow was installed as the "roof", including basically a whole additional house on top of the newer framing. And yup, it was "insulated" with mica from Montana, the mine that was closed because the mica was full of asbestos.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top