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Discussion Starter #84
Throttle Bracket
Most EV conversions use some sort of potentiometer based throttle pedal. I am installing a Toyota Prius throttle. This "fly by wire" set up, connects the potentiometer in the pedal assembly to the motor controller. The programming of the controller can be altered to adjust variables like throttle sensitivity. In order to mount the throttle to the Alfa's firewall, I designed a simple adjustable bracket. I can adjust the angle of the pedal, the spacing between the brake pedal and center console and the distance from the firewall. I always felt that the 105 Alfas had an odd throttle pedal position, so I am taking this opportunity to make an improvement!
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Project Update
It's been a while since my last post, but I have been busy with the project. The exterior is nearly done (need to source some nice chrome bumpers.) The front suspension was completely rebuilt with all new ball joints, tie rod ends, and Centerline performance springs. Fortunately, this car already had Koni Red shocks and adjustable upper control arms.

Pictured are the two battery packs located behind the seats. 14 Nissan Leaf modules in the rear, 24 in the engine compartment. The leaf batteries need to be mounted under compression, so I had some 1/8" aluminum plates water-jet cut with a snazzy logo. The packs are held together by 4 5/16 threaded rods. The unit is then bolted to the chassis. There will be a wooden upholstered cover that will keep hands and debris away from high voltage components.

Motor mount parts are being made by the machinist, more to come soon!
 

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Love what you are doing with this project. I have some front bumpers if you are interested. They need the rear bracket and new stainless bits, but the main part and rubber is sound. I am in Australia, tho'.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Love the project and the progress! My only minor critique has nothing to do with the EV: I am surprised you didn't add Carello headlight covers! Pretty easy to convert the USA buckets to fit inside and Alfa even left the studs there for the conversion!

View attachment 1559768
I like the headlight covers too. I would like to round up the parts to convert them eventually. I was told that you really need to "mold" the bodywork to the covers to make them fit well. I didn't do that, so hopefully they fit! Rich - I think I read an article about your shop in the Hagerty magazine - If that was you, congratulations!
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Lots of progress! Been so busy working on the car, I have been neglecting the posts. The motor has been installed along with the front battery box. The front battery box contains 24 Leaf modules.

A critical system in an EV is the BMS (Battery Management System). This system monitors the voltage of each individual battery. When charging, the BMS shuts off the charger when the high voltage (fully charged state) is reached. If a lithium battery is overcharged, it can overheat causing thermal runaway. Basically the batteries can catch on fire!

Additionally, the BMS triggers an alarm when a programmed low-voltage state is reached. In this car there is a buzzer and flashing light on the dash that essentially tells you to stop driving the car or you will damage the batteries. There is no fire danger in draining the batteries below their minimum voltage. The batteries can be damaged, lessening their capacity. The Charger, Charger Controller, and State of Charge gauge (fuel gauge) are all integrated and communicate on a CAN network. You can see the BMS monitoring leads in the photo, they are the little white wires. I am using the BMS and charging system by Thunderstruck Motors (www.thunderstruck-ev.com)

No, those aren't dishwashing gloves! Special electrical gloves and tools to avoid getting zapped. The last picture is the front box with the lid and battery cut-off switch.The sides of the box are not installed; they are made out of perforated aluminum sheet metal.
 

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The headlight covers fit Spider body contours up to a certain year without modification (late 70's or early 80's ?). They fit later cars but with large gaps at the sides. Use SEARCH and there are many threads with details. Remove the round plate inside the front wheel well and, if you see three backward facing threaded studs, you are good to go. My '76 Spider had these studs.

I like the headlight covers too. I would like to round up the parts to convert them eventually. I was told that you really need to "mold" the bodywork to the covers to make them fit well. I didn't do that, so hopefully they fit!...
 

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What an awesome build. Great clean work! Thanks for sharing this with all of us.
Agree.

I wonder if you could install an engine bay undertray to help aero drag and also to keep that engine bay as spotless as it is currently?
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Agree.

I wonder if you could install an engine bay undertray to help aero drag and also to keep that engine bay as spotless as it is currently?
Pete
The radiator opening is going to be blocked to keep water off the controller and motor. I was also considering a piece of aluminum sheet metal from the cross member up to front valance. Not my car, but something like this:
 

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Looking awesome Seth. I have not made as much progress converting my 88 spider to electric due to time constraints. Some differences between yours and mine are: I put 15 leaf modules across where the radiator is thus blocking that opening. The BMS, charger, controller, DC-DC converter and electric switching box are above the motor where you put batteries. I also put 48 leaf modules in the trunk. Keep up the good work...this is awesome.

Question: How much clearance do you have for the center tie rod link below your motor?
 

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"thermal runaway" I like that, it sounds better than an uncontrolled fire
When I consulted to the air navigation industry (not a controller, more like a planner), I enjoyed all the euphemisms for major incidents (itself an euphemism) with aircraft. My favourites are:
"contained failure" - the engine blew up but all the shrapnel remained within the cowling;
"uncontained failure" - the engine blew up and the shrapnel blew through the engine cowling; and
"controlled flight into terrain" - the pilot crashed the plane.
There are many other.

Elmolino, your project looks fascinating and I am enjoying following it. It will be great to see how it runs when you are finished.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
Question: How much clearance do you have for the center tie rod link below your motor?
The motor is actually mounted ahead of the center link, but the adaptor plate is about a 1/4" inch clearance at full lock. It looks pretty close to 3/4" with steering straight ahead. It is a little tight, but the motor mounts are significantly stiffer than the stock, so it won't be bouncing around.
 
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