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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One wouldn't think there could be five questions regarding the reservoir, but...
1) - Are these reservoirs soldered or just crimped? Or - has anyone had theirs powder coated with no problems?
2)- Pray tell how does the fluid get from the bladder to the brake MC? The bladder appears as if it is sealed except for the vent hole in the cap.
3) - I always leave the reservoir's cap off when bleeding the brakes. Should it be on when bleeding the brakes?
4) - Is the nut holding the center hollow unit soldered on or does it have an aluminum washer?
5) - Is the bend, with notches cut out, normal on the steady bracket (lower right)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Apparently this is the only Girling brake fluid reservoir on the planet, or else everyone else's is perfect, and always has been, so requires nothing. But thanks for looking.
 

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Biba,#1.my 61' Giuliettas' reservoir has soldered seams.Never tried to powder coat one.(POR15 didn't work either) #2.The bladder and cap have to be vented to the atmosphere via a small hole in each. #3.When I bleed my brakes,I leave the cap on loose.This helps to keep brake fluid from from splashing out of the reservoir. #4. The hollow bolt,nut and washer are not soldered and are all magnetic,so no aluminum and I doubt stainless.Looks like zinc or cad plating?Someone correct me on this.Hope this helps,Phil I'd like to know what gloss black coating is brake fluid resistant? Also,Moss Motors sells a decent looking reproduction reservoir assembly.
 

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I don't really get the question.
Girling on a GTV? What year, unless maybe 63 or 64? Do you please have a picture?
Then I'll show you mine... ;-)
I've several lying around of early 105's.

Best, Rik
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm very familiar with the 750 - 101 brake fluid reservoirs, though none had a bladder and I knew they were soldered.

I was just hoping that the 'later' and larger ones were only crimped.

Here's 'mine'.
 

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I'm on vacation, and may not have access to the photo, but I restored one from a 65 1600 Spider veloce that was SERIOUSLY rusted out. Even some of the top threads were missing. After glass beading inside and out, a flashlight inside made a dark room into a planetarium. First I brazed and ground with a dremil tool. Filled in ALL the holes. Ground it smooth. Primer painted it to check for smooth and flat. Media blasted again and SOFT soldered seams and low spots. More sanding. Then I was going to seal it (for sure) with "waterglass" (look it up) inside. I could not find out if "waterglass" would react with brake fluid, and rather than make a mess and disaster, decided to powdercoat. My powdercoat man ALSO questioned my lead work, so he cooked it at a lower temperature for a longer time. It worked perfectly. I could have used a solder with higher melt temperature and been Ok, but I wasn't thinking far enough ahead at that time. Let me know if you want to see finished photo's and I'll locate them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gordon, thanks for the info. I wasn't aware a powder coating shop could lower the temperature and still have the powder flow.

I've read that others have had these early brake fluid reservoirs powder coated but figured they were just lucky.

I just had a duh moment, and now realize that one puts the fluid in the canister itself, and the bellows simply keeps it from overflowing. When I first opened the reservoir, it had fluid inside the bellows, so assumed that is where it went. Yeah, pretty dumb assumption.

This canister and lid are in good shape so should sand blast nicely and there is a good powder coating shop on the way back.

Sounds as if you went to monumental efforts to get yours to come out nicely...and hold fluid.
 

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Biba,
here are some pictures. First brazed, next brazing finished smooth. Then leaded and lead finished smooth. Powdercoated, plated, and almost finished.
 

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Then the details, plating, bracket and decal. I'll never do another this bad again. Not hard, just time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Gordon, a terrific job! I hope this one comes out as nice.
 

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Be sure the interior "elephant condom" is in good shape. It prevents brake fluid from eating up the canister and paint on your firewall. Keith Goring had a good one for my restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Gordon, anyone - and I'm sure I know the answer to this, but all of the brake lines and brake booster were painted black. I'm sure the lines are supposed to be silver zinc and the booster is either the same or gold iridite. Or...?
 

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The booster was gold cadmium, the line to the master cylinder silver cadmium, and the rest of the lines bare (now rusty) steel. Most GOOD restoration shops use the line that is copper colored as it does not rust. It IS NOT COPPER! Somewhere here on the BB it is discussed. (It may not even be copper plated, but does not rust.) This stuff is not brittle like the stainless steel brake line, and ends are easily formed. McCabes Automotive Restorations (Mundelien Illinois) uses this stuff on the best Ferrari restorations, and run into no judging trouble for not using the bare steel (rust prone) original stuff.
I Hope this helps!
 

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I think Gordon is talking about Cunifer brake line which is a copper/nickel alloy,bends easier than other lines,and won't rust.Here in the states,Fedhill brake lines has it.Holden.co.uk does too along with brass fittings,tee's,etc..They have brass wheel cylinder bleed screws which I've never used,but I like the idea and someday I'll get around to ordering some.Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gordon, again thanks a lot. I plan on reusing all of the brake and fuel lines, but good information should I ever need to fabricate them.

Few are aware of it but the flange area of the line ends are 37 degrees, rather than the usual 45 degrees - though the latter seems to work fine.
 
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