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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking into adjusting rear Dunlop disc brakes. My tech reference manuals don't show this detail; can anyone here provide some advice?

I am assuming this is a simple procedure; I just don't want to go at it by guessing and then maybe causing another problem.

Thanks;)
 

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I don't have my book handy, and it's been 20 years since I owned a TI with Dunlops, but there is a horizontal pushrod that you adjust the length of on each rear caliper. For these to work OK, in my experience, they have to be in pretty good condition, including good hydraulic seals. There are a lot of places to get "lost motion" in the rear Dunlop calipers, leading to poor performance.

Andrew
 

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Take off the little cover plate and rotate the toothed wheel with a small screw driver. Just do a little at a time. (BTW, they should self-adjust)
 

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Hi

Mike, that is the most helpful answer to a question I have seen - well done!

There have been a few threads on this subject because the reality is the rear calipers just do not stay in adjustment - ie even if correctly adjusted they soon become unadjusted - and the 'automatic' adjustment each time the hand brake is applied, may have worked when brand new but the slightest wear and you have to resort to the reply above.

Solutions are change to ATE - not easy as requires axle change - or persuade Alfaholics in the UK to make a modification to correct the deficiency of the original.

I, like many others feel the lack of a functioning handbrake bl**dy inconvenient at times and would like to encourage everyone to persuade Alfaholics to make the kit or is someone else already doing it?

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Sprintgtc

Thanks for the great illustration and description.

I also see that you have installed the newer aluminum brake cylinders; I am doing the same but have found a problem. As the brake line nut is tightened, it appears to run out of threads before it can compress the line flare. In other words, the nut is fully seated but cannot seal the brake line flare. My contemplated solution at present, is to have the cylinders milled down by about 3mm or 1/8" so that the nut can be further tightened to the point the flare is compressed.

Anyone else with this problem? If so, what was your solution?

Thanks
 

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If you want to convert to ATEs, I think the easiest way is to change the whole diff assembly.
Andrew
 

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I have quite a few extra 105 diffs, both Ate & Dunlop, so I'm running the Dunlops by choice. They are simple and they are cool. If the self adjusters aren't working, I would disassemble, clean, and check the clevis pins for wear. New clevis pins will reduce the slop considerably. The parking brake is far superior to the little Ate drums. I've yet to find a hill it won't hold.

Sportivo: I'd guess that your hydraulic cylinders may not be the correct ones, or someone changed your brake lines at some point and used incorrect nuts. You probably could mill them down, but you might check with Chris at Highwood Alfa first. He stocks new cylinders and they worked well for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The picture below shows the OE cylinder versus the replacement in cast aluminum. The replacement part has a longer threaded female end, which will not allow the nut on the brake line to seat correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So I plugged the brake line end with a set screw and had that end milled about 3mm or 1/8". Ignore the caliper reading in the picture - it was not correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Just curious - has anyone rebuilt the original cylinders?

Regarding ATE: Yes, I could pull the axles and replace the Dunlop backing plates; then I would need to change the hand brake cables, the hydro brake lines and look into a brake proportioning valve. In essence, months would pass before I could get the car on the road again.

Not to mention storing the Dunlop calipers in a box in my garage for xx years.

Seems I am learning to keep things original.

;)
 

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Which is better???

The cast aluminum reproduction Dunlop rear wheel brake cylinders from Alfaholics or the cast iron reproductions from Alfa Stop?

I do not want to run into the problems that alfa-sportivo had where he had to shave down the Alfaholics units.

Is this a common problem?

What have you guys used?

Thanks!

Tony:confused:
 

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Tony,
Mine are aluminum and came from Highwood in the UK. No fit issues.
 

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Hello everyone,
This is my first day in a blog ever.
I have a 1969 "Stepfront" Giulia GT1300 Junior and a 1968 1750 GTV I am restoring with a couple invisible upgrades such as the 5th gear of the 1300 and electronic distributor.
One thing I would like to fit would be four-piston front calipers.
Does anyone know of calipers of other production cars which may be fitted?

Thank you

Gerard
 

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If I'm not mistaken, the '69 front uprights will take the GTV 6 alu. calipers with the spacers removed.
You might get more answers if posted in the suspension, brakes section.
Ed
 
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