Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Need some advice from true Alfa people. I have the chance to purchase a '69 Duetto spyder from an estate. Car has not been driven or used for maybe 10 years. Does not run, at this point.Engine turns over. Body is solid- good rocker panels, solid wheel arches, body is straight. A few small rust bubbles high on the body, under paint. Minor rust in engine compartment.
Paint is original- some crazing, but mostly in decent shape. Everything on the car is original, and complete.
Two questions-
1. Ballpark, what should I offer for the car?
2. If I am successful, should I have the car repainted?
Appreciate any advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
Puzzled,
First, welcome to the BB!! There are plenty of well informed Alfa experts here that enjoy helping out the new guys.

For the car in question, if you could post photos of the car, BB folks will be able to answer your questions with higher confidence. With these cars, condition means plenty, some might even say condition means everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
These cars sell for a broad range, depending on condition. Anywhere from around $4K for a complete but non running car with "some" rust to mid 20s for an excellent example. Good drivers, needing little, tend to be in mid to high teens.

They tend to rust around the rockers, floors, bottom of front and rear fenders, and sometimes under the grille where the wipers are. Rust bubbles high on the body would be unusual. Would need to see pictures.

A lot of things mechanically can go wrong in ten years of non use. Brake & clutch hydraulics, fuel sytems. It is likely the spica injection pump is toast, which is an $800 rebuild.

I would check very carefully for rust and try and get as good a picture as you can of the mechanical condition. If it is trully without rust in the usual places, the interior is in decent shape and it is complete, depending on what it needs mechanically, without seeing it, I would value it in the $4K to $7K range.

Marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,087 Posts
Roundtail Spiders have achieved collectible status. Therefore, a complete, unmolested car, even in non-running condition does have a not-so-low intrinsic value. Then there are cars that have sat for years and need a complete engine tear down, while others may actually be re-started with just a flush and fluids change. Price will vary considerably based on this factor and without pictures, as a starting point, it's just not possible to provide a fair $$ range to buyer and seller. Nonetheless, as I realize all posters just want to get a figure, I will venture to say that in my experience asking prices could range anywhere from $5k to $15k for something with the description provided.

When there is rust - no matter how small - there is only one way to fix it properly, and this is to get down to the bare metal. IMO, when there is a need to go down to bare metal in a few spots, and there is crazing in addition to that, it is best to re-paint the car.

A word of caution here... Project cars, and this is a project, sell for a lot less than running cars, and they seem a good buy for the cash outlay. However, invariably, they always end up being a lot more expensive than a running car in similar condition. The only financial *advantage* to buying a car like this one is that one doesn't have to pay the total cost up front. That is often the only way some of us can afford to acquire a collectible example to begin with, but over time, the $$ invested to bring the car back to life will always far exceed the cost of a car *done" to the same quality level. Please don't interpret this as a reason for the seller to have to lower his/her price, but rather as a word of caution that any restoration at any level is always more expensive, and it is unrealistic to expect to recover the costs, once the car is deemed done.

Best regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,454 Posts
A word of caution here... Project cars, and this is a project, sell for a lot less than running cars, and they seem a good buy for the cash outlay. However, invariably, they always end up being a lot more expensive than a running car in similar condition. The only financial *advantage* to buying a car like this one is that one doesn't have to pay the total cost up front. That is often the only way some of us can afford to acquire a collectible example to begin with, but over time, the $$ invested to bring the car back to life will always far exceed the cost of a car *done" to the same quality level. Please don't interpret this as a reason for the seller to have to lower his/her price, but rather as a word of caution that any restoration at any level is always more expensive, and it is unrealistic to expect to recover the costs, once the car is deemed done.

Best regards
Best words of advice EVER!!!
 

·
Registered
what part?
Joined
·
10,113 Posts
even in california.. you can put carbs on that sider, if you spica has 'packed up' no smog on that car..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,187 Posts
Best words of advice EVER!!!
Ditto!

My 1981 Spider 'Barn Find' 'Susie' only cost $1,000.

Had I spent $8,000 for a really nice 'Mint' 1981 Spider I would be ahead of the game in many ways. I did not have that kind of money up front, so I bought a seemingly cheap 'project car'.

I have been glad working slowly on every part of this car myself, or directing mechanics, even though it costs me alot more money.

I could have put a bunch of money into the interior, body and paint, early on, but instead decided to only work on the mechanics for now. I want to drive her. I want to learn about Alfa engineering in general and I feel a good way to do that is to live with it, break, rebuild and maintain it over time.

I am $10,000 total into 'Susie' and am driving her around with confidence. She looks terrible and still has many niggly 'issues'. But I trust the new suspension, brakes, tires and transmission. I throw her into corners with abandon smiling, but keeping an ear out for 'funny' noises.

An engine rebuild will be another $5,000, a rebuilt SPICA will be $1,000, a total interior and soft top replacement will be another $4,000? and I am afraid to find out what a total body and paint redo will cost. I imagine that to be $10,000?

So, I can have my 'Barn Find' purchased and built to mint condition for a total of (YIKES) $30,000 or so!
Not a bargain in any way imaginable when you consider a truly 'Mint' 1981 will sell between $5,000 and $8,000.
But, I DO NOT CARE! :)

In the future, I will probably buy a 'Mint' 1966 to 1969 round tail Spider. But I will always have a very fond spot in my heart for my loveable, expensive, 'Barn Find' 'Susie'.

It is how I learned to love Alfa Romeo engineering 'in general', and understand their shortcomings specifically.

Good luck with your purchase.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,221 Posts
Need some advice...
1. Ballpark, what should I offer for the car?
2. If I am successful, should I have the car repainted?
I agree with the number and the sentiments that others have suggested on this thread. Two other thoughts:

- Without seeing at least photos - and really, without inspecting the car firsthand - no one can answer your two questions with any precision. Should you repaint it? Well, what are you planning to do with it (e.g. want a show car, or a weekend driver)? It sounds like it needs some rust repair, so new paint appears inevitable. Note that to paint these cars properly, you need to pull the engine, since the engine compartment is body color.

- The extent of the rust is all that really matters. "A few small rust bubbles high on the body, under paint. Minor rust in engine compartment" is hard to diagnose - it could mean that a little sanding and POR-15'ing will fix things, or it could mean a lot of new sheet metal painstakingly purchased, fitted, and painted. You might want to have a professional bodyman assess the car before making an offer.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top