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...just put the lifting hook on the second pair of head studs...This balance point lifts the engine/trans at the right angle to come out.
Also, most engine lifts have five or six chain links that hang down to the lifting hook. Just by removing the bolt and inserting it through the second link, it shortened the excess chain by five inches; thus extending the 'reach' of the lift.

Paul Spruell uses a nylon ratchet strap from the back of the engine (valve cover web) to the lifting chain to control the angle of the engine. I've seen this recommended on his SpruellMotorsport.com website -unfortunately it may be gone now.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Also, most engine lifts have five or six chain links that hang down to the lifting hook. Just by removing the bolt and inserting it through the second link, it shortened the excess chain by five inches; thus extending the 'reach' of the lift.

Paul Spruell uses a nylon ratchet strap from the back of the engine (valve cover web) to the lifting chain to control the angle of the engine. I've seen this recommended on his SpruellMotorsport.com website -unfortunately it may be gone now.

Mark
I was wondering if that section of the valve covers could be used
 

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Paul Spruell uses a nylon ratchet strap from the back of the engine (valve cover web) to the lifting chain to control the angle of the engine. I've seen this recommended on his SpruellMotorsport.com website -unfortunately it may be gone now.
markgberry said:
I was wondering if that section of the valve covers could be used
If Paul Spruell says it's OK, I wouldn't challenge him. Still, I don't view that cast aluminum web as structurally strong. I might use the cam cover web to tip the engine/trans a bit, but sure wouldn't expect it to support much of the load.

Honestly, the engine/trans tilt is a non-issue. Just put the lifting hook on the second pair of head studs and the engine/trans will come out at the right angle. Once it is almost out, when the oil pan is above the radiator, I usually manually lift the tail of the transmission so it will clear the front sheetmetal. That's all the tilt adjustment I ever need.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
engine is out. thanks everyone for all your collective help. i think i used every single tip i received from all of you! i was able to do it myself without any scraping, wire pulling or metal bending :)
now for the investigation as to where the oil all over the outside of the engine is coming from. i think i may rent a heated pressure washer to clean that nasty engine bay!
regards
mark
 

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If Paul Spruell says it's OK, I wouldn't challenge him. Still, I don't view that pot metal web as structurally strong. I might use the cam cover web to tip the engine/trans a bit, but sure wouldn't expect it to support much of the load.
Thankfully Alfa made it out of aluminum so it would be stronger.
 

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well done getting it out!

To be honest, I’m not seeing much oil in that engine bay..... I’ve driven much worse.

Be interested to see the data plate in the RH firewall (near the fuse box).. never seen that on a Duetto?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
well done getting it out!

To be honest, I’m not seeing much oil in that engine bay..... I’ve driven much worse.

Be interested to see the data plate in the RH firewall (near the fuse box).. never seen that on a Duetto?
Thanks! I was surprised how easy it was to lift out after having been such a pain to disconnect everything. Oh well, it'll come out that much easier the next time :wink2:
That data plate you're referring to is all written in German. The car has euro spec turn signal/running lights, headlights and a KM/H speedo too; so I assume it was originally delivered in Germany.
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Mark
 

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yes, that's a german "Typenschild" (or ID plate) put on every alfa sold in Germany.
So most likely your alfa would have been first delivered to Alfa Romeo Frankfurt.

It states: type, chassis number, permissable total weight, year of manufacture, front axle load limit and rear axle load limit (in that order)
 

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Discussion Starter #31
yes, that's a german "Typenschild" (or ID plate) put on every alfa sold in Germany.
So most likely your alfa would have been first delivered to Alfa Romeo Frankfurt.

It states: type, chassis number, permissable total weight, year of manufacture, front axle load limit and rear axle load limit (in that order)


Thanks for that information!
 

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Discussion Starter #32
removed engine.jpg

removed engine 2.jpg

removed engine 3.jpg Hi All,
i was thinking a complete engine gasket kit to remedy all these oil leaks. does anything stick out as abnormal for these engines? the whole bottom of the engine was a slimy mess but i don't see any one place that caused the problem.
thanks
Mark
 

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i was thinking a complete engine gasket kit to remedy all these oil leaks. does anything stick out as abnormal for these engines? the whole bottom of the engine was a slimy mess but i don't see any one place that caused the problem.
thanks
The airflow around the engine tends to distribute oil pretty thoroughly, so it's difficult to pinpoint the source of a leak. While you have the engine out, you could replace some gaskets, but you would be "shooting in the dark" to guess which ones were causing the leak(s).

There are six O rings that fit inside the head gasket to seal the oil passages that feed the cam bearings. Those O rings can fail, allowing oil to seep out the sides of the head gasket. Looking at your pictures, that area on the L side of your engine does look oily. But that could be oil from another source (cam cover gasket? "half moon" seals between cam cover and head?).

The front crankshaft seal is a likely source for oil leaks. The rear seal too. While gasketed joints don't tend to degrade with time, seals do wear out. If your front pulley has a groove where the seal rides, Chicago Rawhide (weird name, yes) sells sleeves to remedy that.
 

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Ok got it! I pulled 'em along with the header. I loosened the left motor mount from the block as well so that I can take it off once the hoist is hooked up and the weight is off. I'll take the oil filter assembly off too. I should be able to pull it tonight after I finish fabricating a longer boom for the cherry picker I'm using.
How's the weather in San Juan Capistrano right now? Sunny and 72 I would guess. I love that place! We're moving back to So Cal when I'm done at Boeing in a few years.
Thanks for the help!
Mark
What Length Did You Make The Boom To Provide Adequate Clearance For Engine Removal?

-John
 

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If your front pulley has a groove where the seal rides, Chicago Rawhide (weird name, yes) sells sleeves to remedy that.
Chicago Rawhide now known as CR. Up through the 60's most engine seals where made from leather. They pretty much looked just like todays seals. The leather would wear a pretty deep groove in the pulley surface.

The reason for the name is Chicago was were most of the livestock was processed so that would be the largest supplier of leather.
 

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From the pictures you posted.

Rear of engine oil leaks are probably valve cover/ half moon seals. But also look at the 2 big aluminum plugs. These will leak oil through he threads if not tight enough. I take them out and clean the threads in the head and on the plug put sealer on both and reinstall.

Picture with the red arrow I would say is the distributor o ring. This is often the most over looked source of an oil leak. They get hard then start weeping oil from underneath the dist. clamp.

Post a few more pictures taken directly of the sides and front of the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
What Length Did You Make The Boom To Provide Adequate Clearance For Engine Removal?

-John
15 inches. I only needed 6 inches but I bought a piece of scrap 2x2x 3/16 Thick square tube that was already long enough to extend the boom 15 inches, so I just drilled it up for that. Worked great. The cherry picker was the Harbor freight folding model BTW.
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #38
From the pictures you posted.

Rear of engine oil leaks are probably valve cover/ half moon seals. But also look at the 2 big aluminum plugs. These will leak oil through he threads if not tight enough. I take them out and clean the threads in the head and on the plug put sealer on both and reinstall.

Picture with the red arrow I would say is the distributor o ring. This is often the most over looked source of an oil leak. They get hard then start weeping oil from underneath the dist. clamp.

Post a few more pictures taken directly of the sides and front of the engine.
I''ll take some more pix tomorrow. I think you're correct about the distributor hold down and there are definitely several areas around the head/block joint where oil is seeping. What do you guys do with these heads typically when you pull them? Check for straightness? Pull the valves and check em? I was thinking of having my machine shop do all that plus check the cam bearing clearances. Maybe the valve seals too? I was thinking of buying the complete engine gasket kit from classic Alfa and just changing all of them for good measure. I'll of course change those "O" rings you referred to when replacing the head gasket.
Thanks for the replies!
Mark
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If your going to take the head off I would recommend going ahead and having a valve job done and the head surfaced. I wouldn't worry about cam journal clearance. There are no bearings for them. The cam runs on the head casting.

With the age of the gaskets on the engine. If your going to pull the head I would go ahead and reseal the engine. I would also only recommend using Victor Reinz brand. They are much better then the brand Classic Alfa sells. There more expensive but worth the price.

Engine Gasket Complete Set Reinz 1600 105 Series - Spruell Motorsport, Inc - Alfa Romeo Performance Your Store for Sports Car Performance and Racing Parts

http://www.spruellmotorsport.com/block-set-viton-ultimate-leak-engine-ring-seal-kit-750-115-p-4591.html

Also use this the Reinz sealant on the gaskets. One tube is more then enough to reseal the engine and trans. You will probably have enough to reseal the diff housing also.

https://www.amazon.com/VICTOR-REINZ-Sealing-Compound-003989982010/dp/B00O35STTC/ref=asc_df_B00O35STTC/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309898128610&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=18074349195526887960&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9011091&hvtargid=pla-566643843587&psc=1
 

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Discussion Starter #40
If your going to take the head off I would recommend going ahead and having a valve job done and the head surfaced. I wouldn't worry about cam journal clearance. There are no bearings for them. The cam runs on the head casting.

With the age of the gaskets on the engine. If your going to pull the head I would go ahead and reseal the engine. I would also only recommend using Victor Reinz brand. They are much better then the brand Classic Alfa sells. There more expensive but worth the price.

Engine Gasket Complete Set Reinz 1600 105 Series - Spruell Motorsport, Inc - Alfa Romeo Performance Your Store for Sports Car Performance and Racing Parts

BLOCK Set of VITON Ultimate No Leak Engine O-Ring Seal Kit 750-115 - Spruell Motorsport, Inc - Alfa Your Store for Sports Car Performance and Racing Parts

Also use this the Reinz sealant on the gaskets. One tube is more then enough to reseal the engine and trans. You will probably have enough to reseal the diff housing also.

https://www.amazon.com/VICTOR-REINZ-Sealing-Compound-003989982010/dp/B00O35STTC/ref=asc_df_B00O35STTC/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309898128610&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=18074349195526887960&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9011091&hvtargid=pla-566643843587&psc=1
Thanks for the gasket kit tip. I’ll make sure everything is included or order as necessary. While i’m On the subject of ordering: I can’t find a clutch alignment tool for this. Is that because the clutch plate bolts can be accessed through the bottom removable plate? Just wiggle the tranny into position and tighten the bolts after?
Thanks
Mark
 
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