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I believe 5 bolt VWs are 5 x 100 mm, so they are close but don't really fit. You have a couple of options:

1) Use lug bolts with eccentric "floating" seats that take up the 2 mm difference. Personally, not for me.

2) Have the wheel re-drilled by a good machine shop to 5 x 98 mm. A better solution, but by the time this is done, you may not have bargain wheels anymore.

This only addresses the bolt pattern. You will also need to insure the center bore is correct. It should be a snug fit to make wheel "hubcentric"- otherwise the weight of the vehicle rests on the lug bolts which is not desirable. You should also take care to find a wheel that is within the accpetable range of offsets for the 164.
 

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Dear Joe, why is re-drilling 2 mm such an issue? I've just ordered 17 inch Antera 309's for my 164 L and I have consented to having the lug pattern re-drilled. Should I reconsider? Thanks, generaljimt
 

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Properly fitting wheels require that the hub center in wheel centers on axle hub to carry the load of the car and that the bolt pattern matches. So 5x98 does not match 5x100. The tapered surface of wheel bolts or nuts needs to match the countersunk holes in the wheel.

Improperly fitting wheels can be dangerous to drive on and cause vibration.
 

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Re-drilling is not a big deal. My point was it can be expensive. If done right, the wheels will be absolutely fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thankx for all the help guys....

i think i just pick up the wheels and try to sell them for more ;)

Id rather not go through the trouble of redrilling and i think ill be safer with a wheel that fits...
 

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Ill have to disagree, any wheel that doesnt fit SHOULD NOT BE MODIFIED TO FIT!!!!!!

That is a major load point, you can crack a wheel in a very short amount of time.
 

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LBC said:
Ill have to disagree, any wheel that doesnt fit SHOULD NOT BE MODIFIED TO FIT!!!!!!

That is a major load point, you can crack a wheel in a very short amount of time.
I'm with LBC.
On a high quality wheel (or a CNC center piece wheel), it might be okay to modify it a little bit.

But on a VW "CASTED" wheel, drilling it will cause a tiny crack one the smooth "casted surface" that will grow bigger and bigger become unsafe really soon.
 

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Well, yes, it can be unsafe if you just throw them on a drill press and go at it.

Places that work with wheels can aluminum weld, press in steel lug inserts, and then re-heat treat to produce a wheel that is every bit as good as an OEM piece - maybe better. These are the same places that do wheel repair for insurace company accident work, and some of the things they do are amazing.

Wheels are usually not cast or forged with the lug holes. They are drilled later, then the wheels are heat treated.

Like I said before, having wheel re-drilled right is not cheap.
 

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JoeCab said:
Well, yes, it can be unsafe if you just throw them on a drill press and go at it.

Places that work with wheels can aluminum weld, press in steel lug inserts, and then re-heat treat to produce a wheel that is every bit as good as an OEM piece - maybe better. These are the same places that do wheel repair for insurace company accident work, and some of the things they do are amazing.

Wheels are usually not cast or forged with the lug holes. They are drilled later, then the wheels are heat treated.

Like I said before, having wheel re-drilled right is not cheap.
Oh I see... thx!
 

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Redrilling is OK. Most aftermarket wheels are made without any lugnut holes. These are called 'blanks'.

These blanks are then cut for a variety of lug patterns, e.g. 5x98, 5x100, 5x108, 5x114.3, 5x120 etc. (I didn't list the 4- or 6- lugs).

More expensive wheels have an even larger hole cut for inserts, which generally have splines on their outer diameter, and an inner profile that fits the lugnut/lugbolt taper of your application.

There is nothing magical about redrilling. However, unless you are a metalworker who has the tools of the trade and an understanding of metallurgy, do NOT attempt to redrill your own set of wheels on a 'friends' drill press!! An appreciation and respect for the manufacturing process of the wheel is necessary before cutting new holes.

Some shops specialize in this. Others pretend to specialize. Avoid the latter.

I've been using redrilled VW and Toyota 5x100 wheels since 1996, before the whole rice-boy fetish came to be. Not a problem with cracking or wheel balancing etc. I have redrilled SSR Competitions, Volk Racing TE-37's and other brands with (so far) 100% success rate. Hub centers are by far the most important part of how well load from the spindle/hub is transferred to the wheel/tire. If the wheel's hub center is too large, all your load will be borne by your lug bolts or studs/lugnuts. This is not recommended. Be sure to have a set of hubcentric adapters machined to fit the wheel and your hub.

Properly done, you too can enjoy the benefits of the many lightweight wheels on the market not originally made for your car.

Oh, I haven't even gotten into backspacing and offset. Can you tell I've had to go around this issue a few times? :D
 

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Well I'm still a little confused. In my particular application I'm dealing with Antera's ( a high quality aftermarket wheel ) and I think that the 2 mm modification is insignificant if done professionally. I have been assured by both the dealer/installer and Antera themselves that the wheels are hub centric and that they are the correct application for a 164. Should I be concerned about the mod? This is a fairly significant investment on a 10 year old car. The car's condition, however, justifies the expense, assuming it is proper. Thanks, James.
 
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