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Discussion Starter #1
I'm installing a SPICA that Wes rebuilt. The manual takes you through setting the mixture, but I am thinking I am not suppoed to do that step with a new rebuild. Mine is off a '69, so no FCS. The mixture screw has that red thread lock on it like I'm not supposed to mess wit it.

Wes is at the Alfa convention so I can't reach him till he is back.
Any advice would be appreciated.

Cheers,

Jeff
 

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Hmmm. I would think you would have to tune it to your particular engine, but the anti-tamper paint intrigues me. Better talk to Wes personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John. Sounds like I better wait for Wes.
Meantime here is a pic of the top of the SPICA. You can see the paint on more than one screw, including the mixture. To me, this has always meant "don't touch".

Also, Wes's tradmark "E" is on the top of the pump at the front instead of the side near the nameplate. Maybe this makes it easier to see when looking into the engine bay ? Dunno.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
BTW - forgot to mention the pump gap screw also has the paint on it.

If this really means don't set the mixture, I might have thought the manual would say to skip setting it for a newly rebuilt pump, or something to that effect. Rather, the manual leads you to the mixture setting step as part of the set up sequence. But then there's that paint...... :confused:
 

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After looking at your pictures of the red paint marks, I would guess that the marks are there to verify and to make sure no one tampers with the adjustments that were made when the pump was overhauled, sort of a quality control check. Being that is a '69 pump you will have to turn that screw in or out a couple of turns to adjust the mixture. I would install the pump as is, check the set on the actuator, put some oil in the logic section and see where your mixture is before you go twisting things. ;) It might be very close.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
CO meter to set the mixture on a SPICA ?

Is it worth buying a CO meter to set the mixture on a SPICA ?
Norther Tool has one for $209. None of the local parts stores rent them...

Jeff
 

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Is it worth buying a CO meter to set the mixture on a SPICA ?
Norther Tool has one for $209. None of the local parts stores rent them...

Jeff
No. I wouldn't. Not worth $200 in my opinion. You can set the mixture good enough without it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No. I wouldn't. Not worth $200 in my opinion. You can set the mixture good enough without it.


Say, I like that answer.....
I'll put it toward some other part..

Thanks !

Jeff
 

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See if you can find a local shop that has a smog machine you can use or pay to have someone help you if you are that serious about setting up the pump. The pump probably won't require more than a single turn in any direction to get you into the ball park. I would drive the car first and check the plugs. You can turn the mixture screw a half turn and see what the results are. The one reason that the pump was changed to the larger fuel cut off solenoid was to dial in a more precise mixture as evidenced by the fine threads the cut off solenoid has. Also, the cut off solenoid was to stop unburned gas from causing smog on decel. The 69 pump is a great pump and you should enjoy its simple workings.
 

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I have installed an I.E. pump myself, and found that the fuel mixture needed tweaking. I believe that Wes and/or Herb use a CO meter for setting the mixture. Is there a significant difference in the air density (O2 density) between Washington and my home in Mississippi? Who knows? I'll tell you that my IE Spica pump was running a little rich. Like the others suggest, I'd put it your car as is, and run for a while and check your plugs, etc.

HOP
 

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I pretty sure that Wes does not test the rebuilt pumps nor sets mixture on an actual engine. That would be rather pointless. My guess is that he sets the FCS at a standard 9.5 turns which is the starting point for fine tuning the mixture on your particular engine.
 

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I pretty sure that Wes does not test the rebuilt pumps nor sets mixture on an actual engine. That would be rather pointless. My guess is that he sets the FCS at a standard 9.5 turns which is the starting point for fine tuning the mixture on your particular engine.

This is exactly what I experienced.

Greetings from Germany

Bernhard
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, you are all correct. Talked to Wes and he said that although it should be close already, he encouraged me to fine tune the mixture as per his manual.

Jeff
 

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The 9.5 turns to nominal does not apply to a T237/1 ('69) does it? The mixture adjustment screw on the '69 is much more coarse than the units with FCS and doesn't it screw in opposite of the FCS?
You are correct. The 9.5 turns applies only to FCS equipped injection pumps. In the picture below, if you looks closely, you can see the witness marks on where the adjuster "cone" contacts the compensator linkage. A slight turn of the adjustment screw results in a much larger change than in a FCS equipped pump.
 

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I was at Wes's tech section in Detroit and he and Herb talked quite a bit about the T237/1 and how it has gotten a bad rap. His point was that once adjusted, the mix screw needed be messed with so if it takes a few seconds more to dial in a T237/1 it really was no big deal. The other point he made was that if properly set up (including electrically and mechinically) the motor shouldn't backfire. It got me thinking that the microswitch actually hides a potential diagnostic (lots of backfiring = tune up time). I have actually been running around with my microswitch disconnected lately just to see if it is hiding something...
 

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My microswitch has been inop for about a year now. No backfiring. Next time the pump comes off the engine, I'll replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
"I was at Wes's tech section in Detroit and he and Herb talked quite a bit about the T237/1 and how it has gotten a bad rap."

Rich,

Wes told me the same thing on the phone. My '69 had a newer SPICA at some point in the past that had the FCS. Wes recommended going back to the original model (no FCS) if I was doing a rebuild since that was what came with the car. He said when set up right, their rebuild versions of this pump should have no backfire issues. Hope thats right.

Jeff
 
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