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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So before i even think about taking "the plunge" i would love to know what the revisions concerned. I noticed that something was up when i was very graciously given the link to a site featuring performance suspension parts. Noticing that, for example, the different revision have different length torsion bars it got me wondering what the difference is like. I haven't been able to find out anything exact concerning the "feel" of the suspension when it comes to the revision, although i can say that will be a huge determining factor (the feel of the suspension that is). Also i was wondering what changed with the interior, i usually would just go to ebay and autotrader, and i did, but i couldn't find any good pictures to tell the difference, so maybe someone on here can help with this (would be greatly appreciated)

So anyways, what are the benefits of each version, before and after revision? Looking at the GT tailights on a GTV6 really got me wondering if newer was really any better, because **** do i like the tails on those old Alfettas!

Also having owned a mki MR2 i am aware of the fact that sometimes the pre-revision cars are preferred, but then Toyota is a VERY different company then Alfa Romeo
 

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From the top of my mind, there are no real changes between 85 and 86 models, on those years the interior had already been changed (sun roof was available *here in Peru I´ve seen 82s gtv2.0 and gtv6 eurospec with sunroofs*, seats changed in 83 with the Recaros) and the shift linkage was redesigned in 85 so that´s all there is. So te mods you recall must have been aftermarket.
 

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With U.S. Spec cars there are a lot of variations.

1981,82, and 83 cars are all the same with the exception of the gear ratios. The 82' and 83's have the tall 3.42 final drive ratio. It's great for highway driving, or if you are planning some big power upgrades. These early cars also have hand throttles not found on the later cars.

1984 and later cars have:
1. An updated fuel injection system. I would not want to argue about which system is better, they are really about the same, at least they are the way I set them up.

2. Recaro Front seats

3. They all have 4.10 final drive gears. The 1986 model has a taller first gear, exactly like Milanos.

4. Some have the tropic air conditioning system. That's sort of a mixed bag. It helps cooling a little, but it's poorly made. Any of these cars will need upgrades if you want the A/C to work really well.

5. 1984 cars only have a dark section low on the body, sort of a two tone paint job.

6. 1985.5 and 1986 cars have a removable cross member under the car and a relocated rear torsion bar mount. This setup is weaker, but it makes servicing the driveshaft easier.

7. 1986 cars have the Isostatic shift linkage. If it's in good shape it's very good. Most are worn out so expect to overhaul it if you want a good linkage. The earlier linkage can be made pretty decent with a couple upgraded bushings, however it can never be as good as a good isostatic setup.

8. At some point around 84'-85' they moved the steering wheel closer to the driver. I can't figure out just when that happened.

There are other variations of course. I am sure others will chime in.

Generally the 84'-86' cars are a little more desirable, however they are all so close that you should buy based on condition not year. Don't pass up a great 82' for a mediocre 84' that's the same price.

Greg Gordon,
hiperformancestore
 

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Richard Jemison
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Isostatic shift linkage

[QUOTE}7. 1986 cars have the Isostatic shift linkage. If it's in good shape it's very good. Most are worn out so expect to overhaul it if you want a good linkage. The earlier linkage can be made pretty decent with a couple upgraded bushings, however it can never be as good as a good isostatic setup]/QUOTE]

I totally disagree. To much monkey motion. Designed to make it shiftable by girls!.:p
 

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Don't forget that the pre-84s have a different ignition setup.

I'm biased since I own an 84, but I think that you should get an
84 or later as the gear ratios and electrics are a bit more modern.
 

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If you're considering buying an 85,take a close look at the wheels and tires. 85 model GTV6s came with Speedline metric alloy wheels(365 mm).The only tire available for these wheels is the Michelin TRX that is sold exclusively in the US by Coker Tire for something silly like $170 a piece.Most 85s by now have 81-84 factory Campagnolo or BWA 15" wheels or aftermarket wheels.The Speedline wheels are very pretty but should be avoided.If you find an 85 that is otherwise meets your needs be prepared to budget $400- $1000 for replacement wheels and $250-500 for tires.
For reasons known only by Alfa, almost all 82 ans 83 models have blue interiors in a shade of blue that is hard for trim shops to match.

83 GTV6
84 GTV6 x2
85 GTV6 x4
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
With U.S. Spec cars there are a lot of variations.

1981,82, and 83 cars are all the same with the exception of the gear ratios. The 82' and 83's have the tall 3.42 final drive ratio. It's great for highway driving, or if you are planning some big power upgrades. These early cars also have hand throttles not found on the later cars.

1984 and later cars have:
1. An updated fuel injection system. I would not want to argue about which system is better, they are really about the same, at least they are the way I set them up.
Gear ratios seem worth note, 3.42 to 4.1 is a huge difference!, no idea which i would prefer if i am honest, need your guys help here if you can :D. i know this sounds incredibly boring, but does anybody know the top speeds in the first few gears, just so i can get a idea?

2. How do you set them up? (the injection system) feel free to get technical if you need to. Or if its something specific (like one of the cars has coil packs or something) then i would love to know


Sounds good enough so far, so no noticable handling differences with the different length torsion bars then?
 

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Mr. Jemison: I don't understand what part of my statement you disagree with. There is a lot of monkey motion with the isostatic linkage. Various servicing issues are more of a pain on the isostatic cars. In general I actually prefer the early linkage with improved bushings. However, when the isostatic linkage is overhauled and good bushings are used in the other areas, it's really quite good from a driver feel standpoint.

Ottobon: Most of the GTV6s have a 3.5:1 first gear, the 1986 car has about a 2.77:1 first. With the 4.10 final drive ratio, the 3.5 cars have a very short first gear. It's great for burnouts, or dashing across an intersection. Most would say the 4.10 cars are better for the track. With higher powered cars (supercharged, monster 3.0s, 24valvers, etc) I prefer the 3.42 gears due to the extra reach in each gear. My 3.42 car hits 70 in second and 110 in third with no problem. I think the speeds with my 4.10 car are around 60 and 90, although I have not driven that one in a while so I may not be remembering correctly.

They all handle about the same, probably exactly the same with identical tires.

How I set them up is documented on my site. It's way too long to type in here.


Greg Gordon,
hiperformancestore
 

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Here in Europe there were a different succession of changes than in US. Considering that most of the cars were sold here I have difficulty to believe that the succession of events were opposite in the US compared to Europe. But one never knows. Is anything about the changes in US referred to chassis numbers for instance?

Some of the changes here:

-Rear axle 4.1 on all the models.

-New seats and color scheme in 83

-Isostatica gear lever system from 84, introduced at the same time as Alfa 90(which had it)

-The new torsion bar rear mount with short bars introduced in 5.85 together with introduction of 75/ Milano.


On a personal note about the old and new gearshift system, we have them both personally. In a technical point of view I think the Isostacica is the better because it has shorter throw and is more precise. However I like the old one better on feel because it moves more freely even it has a lot of more movement. Anyway, I would not let anyone unaccustomed to the car drive it without a long lecture how to drive it! Considering fast and furious youth as the worst case.
Pro and cons about the torsion bar mounts, I think the old removable crossmember system has the advantage that one can remove the whole crossmember unit with bars if the bars don´t come loose. On the new integrated bar mount one has to take the fight, getting loose the bars, on the car.
 

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Well, I don't know what they did in Europe, but we didn't get the Recaro seats until 1984, and the old shift linkage was there until mid 85.

Greg
 

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Don't forget ...

The 86 came with the third brake light!!:p
 

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The front firewall/bulkhead changed in '85. 1986 cars don't have the blanked out vents that my early '85 has. Possibly a Tropic Air 'update'.

I agree that the 4.1 rear is a bit pointless ('85). Most downhill starts end up being 2nd gear.

The early shift mech is more direct feeling (assuming bushings renewed). It feels old-school, for sure - you can actually feel synchros engaging! Or at least I think I can...

The TRXs and Speedlines look nice. But only for car shows.

Minor changes like window up/down buttons in late '85. Probably a supplier change.

Did the ignition retard smog control wiring get removed in late '85 for US cars?

Seats changed when the dash changed. 1983?
 

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Did the dash changed in 1983? My 82 gtv2.0 has the same dash as the later gtv6s I`ve seen in this forum, except for the a/c I guess, or it is that my car only has ventilation and not a/c?
Th only difference I can recall in the inside is the recaros that came out in 1983 in Europe and Australia (my owner´s manual is from a 83 gtv2.0 australian model although I have the original 82 italian version).

I`ve seen pictures of British gtv6s and they have and alfetta GT like dash, so I think they could have been original and not an enthusiast mod. But I`ve also seen pics of later British gtv6s with the "normal" european style and US type dash...
 

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The new style dash came on the 80/81 models and on, for LHD cars. For RHD drive cars it came much later, I can only speculate 83-84?

I have a 81 model car with the new dash, old seats, old gear shift, long torsion bars, manual window lift and hand throttle.

On European models in 83 it was introduced headlamp sprinkler system in the front bumper. I have not seen this on the American models.

The Swedish models had electric right side rearviewmirrors also. It was for this market only.
 

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Everyone I found this on the old gtv6 site gera ratios versus mph etc

Additions to the Model Differences Page

Gear Ratios

Year MPH per 1000 rpms
[ in 5th gear ]
Rpms at 60 mph
[ in 5th gear ]

1981 21.78 2,750
1982 26.14 2,300
1983 26.14 2,300
1984 26.99 2,200
1985 22.17 2,700
1986 21.78 2,750
 
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I just learned that my '86 GTV-6 has the Milano compressor upgrade (for the Tropical A/C) from the factory; not sure when these made their way into the GTV-sixes, but it may have been some of the very last ones in '86.

I'd be curious if other '86 owners had this factory upgrade?

This much stronger compressor is a valuable upgrade for which APE makes a kit - about $160 not including installation, of course.

David
 

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Only three things to consider before you take the plunge, condition, condition and condition. At the age of these cars it is your biggest consideration. Differences you don't like are easy to fix. You don't like the ratios, go buy a transaxle. Don't like the colour of the seats, go buy a new interior. And who wants to run the stock skinny wheels anyway? Most of the differences can be fixed very cheaply. But by far the hardest issue to resolve is rust.
 
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