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I'm set to replace my Spica pump, but have been offered a set of Dell Orto DRLA 40's / 34 mm venturis for what seems to be a very reasonable price of $199 (including linkage, manifolds and air cleaners).

1. Good Deal?

2. Easier to add than R&R Spica pump?

3. Performance or mileage improvement?

4. Legal / air quality compliant in CO?

Thanks - Dickson
 

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1. Yes, if they are serviceable. I think an injection pump overhaul by Wes Ingram is $940 now.
2. The pump is simply a R&R and tune-up. Retrofitting Carbs is going to require changing the main fuel supply pump/pressure regulator, getting a block-off plate for the Injection Pump mounting point on the block, etc. Hopefully the "kit" you'd be getting would be complete.
3. Performance, a little. To really take advantage of the carbs, you should remove the Spica cams and substitute Euro cams. Fuel Mileage, carbs will be worse most likely.
4. Don't know about Colorado emissions laws, but in some states the engine must be in the original configuration. Carbs will probably not burn as clean as a Spica system. I'd contact the local Alfa Chapter in Denver and ask their advice.
 

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I'm set to replace my Spica pump, but have been offered a set of Dell Orto DRLA 40's / 34 mm venturis for what seems to be a very reasonable price of $199 (including linkage, manifolds and air cleaners).

1. Good Deal?

2. Easier to add than R&R Spica pump?

3. Performance or mileage improvement?

4. Legal / air quality compliant in CO?

Thanks - Dickson
John already answered but I can't resist adding my $.02:

1. Screaming deal, especially if these are early DHLAs and not the emissions models. 34mm venturis are about right for a "warm" 2L but are probably too big for a stock motor. Either way expect to add a few bucks for jets, even if you keep the 34mm venturis. Is the included manifold an actual carb manifold or just the Spica manifold adapter?

2. You'll have to remove the pump either way. Reinstalling the pump was not a trivial process for me; John could probably do it in his sleep though.

3. Performance improvement? Maybe. It's easier to tune for your specific engine application than SPICA for sure. Mileage improvement? Nope, expect gas mileage to go down, possibly a good bit.

4. This is the sticky point. If CO has a 25 year rolling emissions exemption like CA then you're golden. UT does not, which is the main reason why I don't think I'll ever buy another SPICA vintage Alfa as long as I live here. '67 and older cars are emissions exempt everywhere. You can probably tune the carbs to pass emissions, and I doubt the inspector would have any idea they weren't stock. Without a gas analyzer in your garage I don't think that would be an easy process.

-Jason
 

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Here in South Carolina, I could put Webers on my 2005 Acura and it would not fail inspection.
 

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Gotta love Southern Carolina.
Many of the cars here can't leave the state...

Laws aside, the engine will "feel" different I've read. This makes those of us curious types more willing to make a change for the enjoyment of learning and experiencing something different.

1. $$ deal? May possibly be more interesting trying to sell the car in the future.
 

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Dickson here is my 40 Lira:

As I've said before Spica has a definite advantage when gaining and dropping altitude here in Colorado - like driving from Denver to Vail and back. This is because of the [admittedly rudimentary] altitude compensator can adjust the mixture to some degree. With carbs, you really need to swap jets if you gain or drop more than a few thousand feet.

As to emissions compliance, this is sort of a grey area right now. You probably know all of this backstory but others might not.

There used to be a rolling 25 year exemption of sorts - if your car was 25 years or older you only had to pass the tailpipe test once, buy Collector plates and never need to be tested again (as long as you didn't let the plates expire).

Now, they've changed the rules and Collector plates are only available for cars 1975 and earlier. However, cars from 1976-84 that got the Collector plates before the rules changed are "grandfathered in" and get to keep them. The positive part is that pre-1976 cars no longer need an initial smog test - just show up at the DMV, pay your money, and get the Collector plates.

However, cars 1976-81 still have to pass a tailpipe test [annually, I believe] and cars 1982+ have a bi-annual dyno-based smog test.

Here's where things get fuzzy: Technically, the Air Care Colorado stations are not supposed to be "inspecting" your car, they are only supposed to check for the presence of a few things like the cat, oxygen sensor, air pump, etc. (if so equipped) and then test the car. A switch to Carbs, or running headers, *should* not cause you to fail if the actual emissions are OK. However, the operators at the stations have refused to test some carb converted cars for quite minor issues lately, so it seems this situation is getting worse.

For most late-Spica cars converted to carbs the main sticking point is the air pump: they want to see that it's there and hooked up.
 

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I'm set to replace my Spica pump, but have been offered a set of Dell Orto DRLA 40's / 34 mm venturis for what seems to be a very reasonable price of $199 (including linkage, manifolds and air cleaners).

1. Good Deal?

2. Easier to add than R&R Spica pump?

3. Performance or mileage improvement?

4. Legal / air quality compliant in CO?

Thanks - Dickson
That's a screaming deal. Get them now, and if you change your mind about the conversion you can flip them for at least what you paid for them if not more.
 

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The so-called low emissions Dellorto's (I have DHLA "H's") get great fuel mileage and on a 2L Euro Alfetta engine, run quite well. I get 24-26 in town and have gotten 28-32 on highway driving. Better than my 69 Spica. The pickup is great. That said I love my Spica too, so smooth, reliable and fiddle-free. Good discussion above. Perhaps the altitude thing is the decider, who will replace jets when heading up the mountains? Sounds like a good deal. Bruce
 

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Seriously, the manifold and air cleaners alone are worth the asking price. If you don't want them send me the info! :)
 

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If you don't want them, PM me and I can have 2 bills and s/h costs out the door today! Then again the thread is 3 months old now. . .
 

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Since I live in europe and you often mention "euro cams" and carbs...
Regarding mileage my standard Alfetta GTV with Dellorto carbs, of course, consumed 8 litres / 100km on highways with a speed of around 120-130 km/h.
I have no idea how this translates into miles per gallon???
 
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