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Tried the puller method after soaking it in WD - no chance.
WD40 is a great product for rust removal---the "WD" stands for "water dispersal." But it is absolutely NOT a penetrating oil, despite some of the company's marketing claims. I really like WD40 for its intended use, and there are always 10+ cans sitting around my shop at any given time, but it should really be used for light rust removal only.

There are a number of commercially available products that are actually penetrating oils (and some work pretty well), but a number of years ago I got turned onto a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone as an alternative---I have used it for a few years in working on 40-50-year old Porsches and BMWs with great success.

My recent junkyard GTV6 project had spent its entire life in the midwest and on the east coast and all of the fasteners underneath were rusted, which makes spoiled west coast mechanics like myself cringe! However, I made a point to liberally apply the ATF/acetone to anything that I was planning on attacking several days beforehand. I have had a lot of the car apart in the 4-5 months that I have owned it, and the only casualties so far have been a single rounded-off rear brake rotor bolt and one snapped rear brake hard line (I cracked loose every other brake and clutch hard line fitting with no issues!).

Last weekend I tackled the driveshaft and the rear engine mount and DeDion pivot mounts. While it was a ***** to partially remove the bellhousing with the engine in the car to allow enough access, the rusted-in rear engine mount actually pressed out quite easily. And I was able to press out the original DeDion pivot bushing BY THE CENTER PORTION and with the rear axle still hanging in the car by using a C-clamp and a standoff---the homebrew penetrating oil obviously did its job.

Now, your results may vary, but it is cheap and easy to try before resorting to more extreme methods . . . .
 

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Every bushing like this I've removed has yielded to the "cut the shell" approach. Sometimes it's hard to get a good angle to cut with (like the rear motor mount, in place), but if you cut through the outer diameter of the shell, it will relax and you can knock them out. Always do that first, before resorting to the more difficult methods. I cut at least one side, and usually both sides 180 degrees apart. Oh... and Kroil's my preferred industrial penetrating oil.

Because of variations in the OD of replacement bushings, installation of a new one can be tough also. We're talking about an interference fit where thousandths of an inch, maybe ten-thousandths, can make the difference between a new bushing pressing in well, versus one getting impossibly stuck. And, we're talking about two different materials, steel and aluminum, which is why you should always use heat to expand that aluminum as much as possible. Freezing the steel/rubber bushing can also help, but it all has to go together quickly and dead STRAIGHT, with a thin coating of moly grease or anti-seize on the OD of the bushing. Even doing what I'm saying here, we had an awful time last year with a new rear mount on my son Mike's car. I had to dress down and chamfer the OD, heat the housing, lube the bushing shell, and press the pee out of it to get the #[email protected]&* thing to go into the bellhousing hole. And, I had sanded the ID of
the hole, too! Terrible fit, especially for a bushing that just can't go anywhere once it's in there.
 

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For future reference, for 'next time' keep your old mounts as drifts. I just changed the rear engine mount, thought 'how am I going to fit a socket over the bit of tube protruding out?' and my eyes fell on the old mount next to me. Once the inside was removed, it was perfect - interestingly just a slightly fraction smaller - maybe half a mm - than the new one, so it didn't get stuck when insterting the new one beyond the edge of the casing.
Being a packrat, I've saved all kinds of round bits over the years. A couple of days ago I needed to press a bearing race out of the front half a Land Cruiser transfer case which required a drift that was 65mm exactly (64 too small, 66 too large). It tokk me 2 hours of rummaging, but I found a broken pot lid knob from years ago which was exact. Hey presto! race out, race in in 5 minutes.
 

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Being a packrat, I've saved all kinds of round bits over the years. A couple of days ago I needed to press a bearing race out of the front half a Land Cruiser transfer case which required a drift that was 65mm exactly (64 too small, 66 too large). It tokk me 2 hours of rummaging, but I found a broken pot lid knob from years ago which was exact. Hey presto! race out, race in in 5 minutes.
Haha exactly, you never know when these bits of "rubbish" come in handy!
 

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WD40 is a great product for rust removal---the "WD" stands for "water dispersal." But it is absolutely NOT a penetrating oil, despite some of the company's marketing claims. I really like WD40 for its intended use, and there are always 10+ cans sitting around my shop at any given time, but it should really be used for light rust removal only.

There are a number of commercially available products that are actually penetrating oils (and some work pretty well), but a number of years ago I got turned onto a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone as an alternative---I have used it for a few years in working on 40-50-year old Porsches and BMWs with great success.

My recent junkyard GTV6 project had spent its entire life in the midwest and on the east coast and all of the fasteners underneath were rusted, which makes spoiled west coast mechanics like myself cringe! However, I made a point to liberally apply the ATF/acetone to anything that I was planning on attacking several days beforehand. I have had a lot of the car apart in the 4-5 months that I have owned it, and the only casualties so far have been a single rounded-off rear brake rotor bolt and one snapped rear brake hard line (I cracked loose every other brake and clutch hard line fitting with no issues!).

Last weekend I tackled the driveshaft and the rear engine mount and DeDion pivot mounts. While it was a ***** to partially remove the bellhousing with the engine in the car to allow enough access, the rusted-in rear engine mount actually pressed out quite easily. And I was able to press out the original DeDion pivot bushing BY THE CENTER PORTION and with the rear axle still hanging in the car by using a C-clamp and a standoff---the homebrew penetrating oil obviously did its job.

Now, your results may vary, but it is cheap and easy to try before resorting to more extreme methods . . . .

Thanks for the tip!

I thought I'd give it a go - always willing to learn from other people's experience. The store I went to only had one type of ATF available which interestingly didn't mix with the acetone, just like oil and water. It was synthetic ATF, perhaps it needed to be mineral, in hindsight?
Having a chemistry background I'm guessing the ATF, already a thin oil, is what lubricates between the two surfaces and the dilution with acetone is what makes it think enough to seep in all the gaps.

Not a wasted purchase, as I needed some ATF anyway, but I did still try - in a spray bottle, though I had to keep shaking it to get the two liquids to temporarily emulsify together.

So far it does seem to have worked on the few things I've sprayed with it, though these are parts I hadn't previously tried undoing. I'm still soaking the ball joints, and awaiting my hydraulic press to arrive in the post before I tackle them... So far, one of the three most annoying jobs on the car. To be fair, especially for the amount of work I'm doing on the car, most things have cooperated and come apart how they should.

A side note, and a curiosity - after all the aggro I needn't have removed the top mount from my transaxle anyway. The spare one I bought (for the exact same car, so completely identical... In every other respect) I found out to be in ten times better condition - so that's the one going back on the car. I thought here we go, more top mount removal fun (glad I hadn't put the new one in the other box yet). But this one came out dead easy! Both looked so old I presume them to be original, yet on the one the outer rim is 2mm thick metal (hence why so hard to chisel off) pressed straight into the housing; and on the other it is 1-1.5mm thick metal, slightly smaller diameter, with a thin rubber layer on top with segmented parts going around - like the new ones they sell. It came off a piece of cake.
 

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On the first photo, the 7 small rectangular dents along the circumference of the outer circle are the "stakes". The metal was hit hard with a tool that had a tip of this shape after the bushing was installed and folded the metal slightly over the bushing edge, preventing it from slipping out. Like it was ever going to come out.

I did this a couple of years ago. You grind these away somehow. I used a stone tipped thing that fit into a drill bit. It took a long time for me. There might be a better way to grind them. I was beginning to lose patience, but finally got them all off. Once they are off, you'll never have to do it again.

After that the bushing comes out this side by pressing them out from the other side. I used some exhaust pipe sections of the diameter of the bushing shell on one side and a larger one on the other side. There is an outer shell on the bushing. It is visible inside the diameter of the dedion hole.
If you grind the "Stakes" what happens when you put the new bush in ? I suppose you need the Stakes to keep the outer washer in place or are the Stakes unnecessary cosidering the bush is going nowhere ?
 

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You will never need the stakes again. The new bushing will never come out on its own. The engineers must have thought that hydraulic presses were laying about the place and you could accidentally run over one and it would pop up and engage on your bushing.
 

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CRC Freeze-Off is a great penetrating oil which shocks the parts with cold, causing them to move enough to allow the penetrant between the 2 surfaces. You'll like it.
 

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Just bang it out with a socket it should come out. If not use a reciprocating saw to cut right before the metal and that should loosen it then bang it out. If I’m not mistaken it is plastic
 

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Did this today in the car.

Used a Dremel to work on the stake points. Sprayed some Freeze-Off on it.

Air chisel from the bottom and the bushing flew out and across the garage.

I cleaned up the stake areas in the triangle's hole so they wouldn't inhibit installation of the Performatek poly bushing replacement. Liberally coated things with the special grease provided. I was able to pull the new bushing into place using a large socket, long bolt, washers and a 3/8" impact gun. Coulda done it with hand tools though.
 

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It's easier if you remove each arm off the car. Then use a bench vice closes to the end find the closest size socket that will fit through the housing of the bushing end... Hammer away... If need be spray WD-40 around it first.... Super easy!
 

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I am trying to remove the DeDion bushing from my 1975 Alfetta. So far, I have drilled out the center of the bushing. I am having trouble removing the rest of the bushing. Here are two photos showing what it looks like (from top and bottom). I have a couple of questions:

1) I have read on the forum about "stakes" that are supposed to hold this bushing in but I cannot identify them. Are these stakes visible in the photos?

2) It seems that the remaining rubber is bonded to a metal ring surrounding it, but my understanding is that there is no metal sleeve outside the DeDion bushing. Should the metal ring visible in the photos come out with the bushing, or is it part of the DeDion triangle?

Thanks,
Dave
You can use a jig saw with a metal blade and just cut the bushing right before the actual suspension arm. That should give you a couple millimeters to shrink the actual bushing when you are banging on it. As you can see from your pictures that the bushing slips out only in one direction. Those tabs don’t allow it to slip out the other direction also where those tabs start is just about where the bushing ends don’t over cut. Use this method if your bushing does not bang out with a hammer and chisel. Use a metal pipe or a large socket to place it around and under the outer diameter of the bushing ( just a tad larger diameter than the actual bushing) so while hitting the bushing could fall into the pipe or socket plus have a solid base to absorb the impact.
 

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It's easier if you remove each arm off the car. Then use a bench vice closes to the end find the closest size socket that will fit through the housing of the bushing end... Hammer away... If need be spray WD-40 around it first.... Super easy!
What do you mean by "each arm"?

I have my clutch housing off to replace it, so this was a super easy way using air tools.
 

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when alfa installs these bushings, they have (i m guessing) a big *** press that slightly deforms the dedion cup in 3 places, not massively so, just enough to interfere with the bushing coming out. the manual instructions for installing the new bush are cute...asking the service tech to re-stake the cup. i don;t think king kong could re-stake the cup. fortunately the poly part fills the gap top to bottom, so no movement possible, no need to re-stake the cup.
 

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when alfa installs these bushings, they have (i m guessing) a big *** press that slightly deforms the dedion cup in 3 places, not massively so, just enough to interfere with the bushing coming out. the manual instructions for installing the new bush are cute...asking the service tech to re-stake the cup. i don;t think king kong could re-stake the cup. fortunately the poly part fills the gap top to bottom, so no movement possible, no need to re-stake the cup.
Looking back on this, I'm thinking the air chisel alone woulda worked just fine without futzing around with a Dremel on the stakes.

I may never know, unless one of my buddies needs it done in the future.
 
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