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I have an early 3 meter wheelbase coupe but my engineer suggests I use an SS ratio differential as the car is supercharged. Does anybody know of a supplier who has experience manufacturing new crown wheel and pinions in the SS ratio?

Thanks Toby from Australia
 

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Bacci Romano in Italy currently doesn't list any 6C parts on their web site, but they may be worth contacting.
 

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Brineton engineering in UK say they have Alfa gearbox gears and have made Bugatti CWP sets but Alfa rear axle bits are "to be added"
Brineton Engineering Alfa link
The UK company who always seem to know the current state of re-manufacturing of prewar Alfa bits are Jim Stokes Workshops, and they have been helpful to me in the past when I needed a bit in a hurry.
Do let us know if you find a source, I fancy a higher ratio from the 10/51 on my 6C GT but doubt I could afford a new CWP, perhaps your old one would do me?

Chris
 

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Brineton engineering in UK say they have Alfa gearbox gears and have made Bugatti CWP sets but Alfa rear axle bits are "to be added"
Brineton Engineering Alfa link
The UK company who always seem to know the current state of re-manufacturing of prewar Alfa bits are Jim Stokes Workshops, and they have been helpful to me in the past when I needed a bit in a hurry.
Do let us know if you find a source, I fancy a higher ratio from the 10/51 on my 6C GT but doubt I could afford a new CWP, perhaps your old one would do me?

Chris
Thanks for the tip Chris, I can certainly contact you once re my current one once I have sourced the one I need.
 

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I have now found a place that will make me these for a reasonable price if anyone needs one.
 

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Hello Toby,

As with many technical queries, the obvious answer from an historical context may not be the be the most satisfying today? But then again, even today, sometimes one must experiment with some variance from as-is (or "as-was") in order to learn what might be best for your particular situation?

I am attaching a technical document from Alfa Romeo dated 1935. It describes a variety of Alfa Romeo car types and some combinations of what might be considered typical in the day in the way of certain ratios that were typically utilized. None had a 3-meter wheelbase (so far as I know) but some were close. In any case, the crown & pinion gear ratios were generally paired with gearbox ratios that were chosen at least in part based on the power to weight ratio of an individual car with its body. Lots of variation was possible and some of them had nothing to do with what we have as meaningful tools today!

Today, we have generally better fuels and generally better roads than those of 1930 or thereabouts. Some people tune their engines today to make use of better fuels and others do not. Some people will "race" or drive aggressively on tracks that are quite smooth and others will rally or road race on roads that are not so friendly and predictable as others. Each parameter affects what might be chosen as "optimum". Wheel sizes and tires also can make a great difference! So can springs and dampers. So will one's own ability as a driver who either can or cannot adapt to the limitations of some level of "old technology", no matter how advanced it was in its day!

Alfa Romeo built and/or prepared their cars originally with an eye to the fuels that were available at the time and also a general expectation of what a customer might have to deal with in their own locale. If a customer had access only to lesser-quality fuels than normal (or routine access to better-quality fuels than normal?), then certain parameters might have varied from the "normal" even from new.

So, the attached chart from 1935 may not have answers so much as an insight as to "what was" at a certain time. But, we should not assume that Alfa Romeo built no cars that varied from what they prepared to be only a general guide!

As an historian and as a mechanic (always seeking to learn in either field), I would very much like to learn more about which car you are seeking to make more suitable to your wants and needs. I recognize that such efforts have been made for almost every car since the day it was first sold. Special cars have often received more attention than those which might seem rather pedestrian. But not always! I believe that there is always room for improvement and sometimes it is merely the current environment that dictate changes that are desirable.

Best of luck!

John de Boer
The Italian Car Registry
 

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Hi John, thank you for that information. I was wondering if you would know where I could source a factory drawing with dimensions for an 8C front stub axle?
 
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