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I would try Alfa Parts Exchange (APE). I certainly hope you don't round that bolt off. They ARE tight but if your impact wrench is actually putting out 300-400 ft/lbs of torque, I would think hard about what else might prevent the bolt from loosening. Good luck.
 

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be careful - do you have a tab washer? it may be the reason youre having trouble? Once I folded the tab down on the tab washer on mine, the nut undid very easily....

otherwise, i bought replacements was classicalfa in the UK
 

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Discussion Starter #4
be careful - do you have a tab washer? it may be the reason youre having trouble? Once I folded the tab down on the tab washer on mine, the nut undid very easily....

otherwise, i bought replacements was classicalfa in the UK
No tab and different bolt than Classic Alfa has.
 

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Hi, about three weeks ago I struggled with the removal of the crank pulley bolt on my 74 alfa engine after the flywheel had been removed. I finally removed it by wedging the crank and using a three foot breaker bar extended with a four foot chunk of steel tubing which was effectively a four foot breaker bar. The bolt then slowly released. There was no evidence of any thread locker on the bolt which isn't necessary as you have a lock washer. Good luck. Dennie
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi, about three weeks ago I struggled with the removal of the crank pulley bolt on my 74 alfa engine after the flywheel had been removed. I finally removed it by wedging the crank and using a three foot breaker bar extended with a four foot chunk of steel tubing which was effectively a four foot breaker bar. The bolt then slowly released. There was no evidence of any thread locker on the bolt which isn't necessary as you have a lock washer. Good luck. Dennie
Hey Dennie, How did you wedge the crank with the flywheel off? The pulley has some holes in it, but too small in diameter for sufficient leverage. Likely an Alfa tool to grip the pulley.

I need to find a tool that will grip a now rounded nut/bolt.
 

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No tab and different bolt than Classic Alfa has.
Its suppose to have a lock tab. They are bigger the the carb and electronic injected cars. As far as I know they haven't been available for several or more years.

If you have some of the points left a 6 point one and a half inch socket might work or whatever the metric equivalent is. But it needs to be 6 point.
 

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I have a spare one that is not perfect but it is better than the one in the picture.
 

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MCain- if you still have enough good flats on the bolt head, tap (hammer) on the snuggest fitting metric or sae 6-point socket you have, then remove the sheet metal flywheel inspection cover at the rear of the motor. This gives you access to the flywheel teeth which can be locked by various methods, the best of which is using a real flywheel locking tool. I have used an inexpensive one from a VW Bug specialist shop. NAPA auto parts would probably have or could quickly get one. With flywheel firmly locked THEN try to use the old 4 foot cheater bar arrangement. If no joy, then report back here for further adventurous ideas.:smile2:
 

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If you have to hammer on a smaller socket you will have a better chance of success with a 12 point. 7/8" Whitworth (1" BS) is slightly smaller than 38 mm and you would stand a good chance with one. I have a 7/8" Whitworth 12 pt box end but I do not have a socket.
 

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Let us know how that tool works out.
I looked up hex head sizes. 38mm is 1.496" and 7/8"W is 1.480, so the Whitworth socket is .020" undersize.
 

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old mechanic trick-- fit the socket to the bolt / nut head with a breaker bar. Wedge the breaker bar against something that wont allow it to turn clockwise-- the ground, a fram member etc. Make sure the socket is on there good. remove coil wire. Bump the starter. Engine will turn nut will stay staionary and voila its off like butter
 

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Hi, to keep the crank from turning per pulling on the breaker bar I had to place a long screw driver up beside a rod to bind things up. In doing this no damage was caused. Dennie
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Autozone has an awesome tool lending program. I got a brand new 3/4 1300 ft lb impact wrench to keep for up to 3 mos with a full refund.

Sadly, it did not remove the nut.

Nut getting rounder, project on hold until tool arrives.

Plan b or c is to saw / grind a slot on top of the nut and hit with a cold chisel. That nut is going down!
 

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Hi MCain, you might consider the use of heat to free up that bolt. If the threads are rusted then heat may not work as the area to be heated is too large. However if someone used red locktite on the bolt then the heat from a small tip on an oxy-acetylene torch may free it up. At that point I would mig weld a bar of quality steel such as an old open end wrench to the bolt to allow leverage from a longer steel tube. If the bolt is rusted in place it would take a lot of heat to free it. Good luck, Dennie
 

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I agree that there is a good chance that it has Loctite as there is no locking washer.
 

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Plan b or c is to saw / grind a slot on top of the nut and hit with a cold chisel.
I'm a little skeptical that plan "B" (or is it "C"?) will accomplish much. What do you hope will happen when you "saw / grind a slot on top of the nut and hit with a cold chisel"? Admittedly I don't have a simpler idea, but I don't think mangling the head of the nut is going to loosen it.

If the thing becomes completely round, your only recourse may be to pull the engine (to get better access) and weld a large nut to the crankshaft nut. While it is still hot from the welding, apply the impact wrench to that new nut.
 
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