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Discussion Starter #1
Okay I made a post earlier that I had a coolant leak, but now after close inspection I have found out that there is a crack in my block.

The car is a 76 spider and I have done a lot of work to it, so I would hate to let it go. What are my options? I have way more hours than money in the car, and I am attached to it.

What would you do if you were in my position?

Thanks
 

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Okay I made a post earlier that I had a coolant leak, but now after close inspection I have found out that there is a crack in my block.

The car is a 76 spider and I have done a lot of work to it, so I would hate to let it go. What are my options? I have way more hours than money in the car, and I am attached to it.

What would you do if you were in my position?

Thanks
You don't say where the crack is, but if a serious or complicated weld, I would probably swap everything on/in to another block. Should be able to find a 2l block at little or no cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The crack is on the drivers side below the exhaust manifold. I had to use a mirror to get a good look at it. If you look between the first and second exhaust manifold it is below there on the block. I will try and get a pic to post next weekend when I have access to the car.
 

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I'll probably catch hell for this one, but. . .

JB Weld. Seriously. With careful prep, a crack on the outside of the block that affects only the water jacket can be repaired without pulling the engine, provided that you've verified that the coolant isn't going into the oil. It's at least worth a try.

I had a cast iron Mercruiser engine with freeze damage that had been JB Weld-repaired, and I ran it for years without any leakage. There are several boat-oriented sites that can explain the prep you'd need to do, which includes pulling manifolds, grinding angles into the crack, drilling the ends, cleaning meticulously, etc. Yes, you'd need to watch it carefully. No, it's not the best way to repair the problem. But it can get you on the road for the summer and the worst that will happen is that you'll end up having put three hours into a repair that may not hold, rather than replacing the entire engine.

Now excuse me, whilst I change into my Nomex snuggie and wait for the fireworks. >:)
 

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Richard Jemison
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Sealants

If you use sealant, you will have a very difficult time welding due to imputities.
However it can be ground out....

I suggest cdraining the coolant and blowing the coolent out then cleaning with Carb cleaner. Thend sand an area about 1/2 inch larger than the crack to have an unpoluted block surface. Mix JB weld and cover crack. Drive the JB weld into the crack with a flat hammer or such to force the JB weld into the opening. Then coat over the crack with about 1/8 thich puddle. Let sit for about 4 days to totally cure. Then fill and drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Alfar and Cheb thanks for the info it is worth a shot. I really have nothing to lose. If I have time this weekend I will give it a try.

Shiraz, I would still be interested in an engine. I am in Greenwood, SC, upstate area. What kind of condition is it in, etc...

Thanks for the help guys.
 

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Years ago I poked a 3" hole in the side of a VW water cooled cast iron block, long story. I completed a repair by prepping the perimeter well and the perimeter of the piece well and cemented it back together with a two part "putty" epoxy. It held well for many years.

Did the block crack from freezing?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am sure that is what happened and it is my own dumba$$ fault. I flushed the system before I stored the car for winter and never put any antifreeze in it. I just drained the radiator. I kept the car in my garage with a blanket on the engine. I assumed there wouldn't be enough water left in the block to do any harm plus it was in my garage. I guess it got too cold. I won't make that mistake again.

I am too old be making such silly mistakes.
 

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If the crack was caused by freezing water I would pressurize the system. It's possible there may be other cracks that may open up later after several heat/cool cycles. Keep your options open, the block may be a candidate for scrap.
 

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I recently seen a crack on my engine after it’s been serviced.

It’s a 105 Alfa romeo 1600. The mechanic pointed out a hair line crack on the side of the engine.

What would have caused it? As it hasn’t been running almost a year sitting on the garage floor waiting for light restoration to be completed.


What do I do to get it repaired?

Appreciate for any assistance

Regards
Annand
 

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If you use sealant, you will have a very difficult time welding due to imputities.
However it can be ground out....

I suggest cdraining the coolant and blowing the coolent out then cleaning with Carb cleaner. Thend sand an area about 1/2 inch larger than the crack to have an unpoluted block surface. Mix JB weld and cover crack. Drive the JB weld into the crack with a flat hammer or such to force the JB weld into the opening. Then coat over the crack with about 1/8 thich puddle. Let sit for about 4 days to totally cure. Then fill and drive.
........excellent prep advice,
JB weld should do the trick, we applied it to the water-jacket and manifold inlet, Cosworth MAE) dissimilar metals; cast to steel, ergo different rates of thermal loading (expansion and contraction). held up for 8 events so far ...lots of vibration @10,000 RPM ..no leaks. Good temporary fix , till you are ready for a replacement block.
 

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jb weld

Had an old 920 Cat front end loader we used every day. It was losing water so we disassembled and found electrolysis damage to 2 liners. New parts were days away, we needed the loader, so we dabbed JB Weld on the perforations, put it together, and hoped for a useful week. It ran for years before we replaced the machine.
 
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