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I will likely be replacing my battery at some point this summer as it is almost 7 years old and it does not seem to be holding a charge more than a few days if the car isn't driven. When I was in Costco a couple of weeks ago, I noticed their Kirkland (Costco brand) batteries where about 1/2 the price of a Die Hard or other name brand battery. About $45 for the correct size for my S3. Battery was 650 CCA with a 3 yr full replacement warranty and 7 year limited warranty. That sounded like a pretty good deal. Anyone ever try one of these?
 

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I will likely be replacing my battery at some point this summer as it is almost 7 years old and it does not seem to be holding a charge more than a few days if the car isn't driven. When I was in Costco a couple of weeks ago, I noticed their Kirkland (Costco brand) batteries where about 1/2 the price of a Die Hard or other name brand battery. About $45 for the correct size for my S3. Battery was 650 CCA with a 3 yr full replacement warranty and 7 year limited warranty. That sounded like a pretty good deal. Anyone ever try one of these?

Cosco batteries rock:D. 3 year full replacement and pro-rated after that. The're all I buy for my daily drivers but for the Alfa I'll probably get (from them) the Optima. Getting back to the original question, batteries are only made by like 3 or 4 companies. Even the Wal Mart "yellow" is a top quality battery but it costs more than the "Kirkland." I replaced a Kirkland in my wifes Cherokee that was still good at 6 years old "just because."
 

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I put a Costco battery in my Alfa 2 years ago and it has worked perfectly.
 

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Costco Batteries

Cosco batteries rock:D. 3 year full replacement and pro-rated after that. The're all I buy for my daily drivers but for the Alfa I'll probably get (from them) the Optima. Getting back to the original question, batteries are only made by like 3 or 4 companies. Even the Wal Mart "yellow" is a top quality battery but it costs more than the "Kirkland." I replaced a Kirkland in my wifes Cherokee that was still good at 6 years old "just because."
Gee, I'm not accustomed to replacing a battery "just because;" we used them until they were no longer serviceable then they went to the limited use as in the garage or for the winch after being charged. I was accustomed to pulling in and using the trickle charger over night until we were satisfied that the battery was done for; but then I was also accustomed to getting a "mal-behaving" or "broken" car home at any cost. Summer heat took a huge toll on a our batteries frequently, even expensive DieHards.

"Just because" is a refreshing thought....
 

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I just replaced my Dodge Truck battery with the Costco kirkland brand. The cold crank amps was a little lower than what I had, I think by 50 amps, but it's what the costco catalaog spec'd for the truck. The overall size of the battery was a little smaller too. So far no problems, they do seem to have a pretty descent warranty and it was half the price. besides this one I just bought I can't believe what batteries cost say at Sears or Firestone:eek:

Robert
 

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I believe Costco carries optima style batteries. I'd recommend picking up one of those - they are sealed and have excellent performance...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies everyone. Sounds like they're a decent deal after all. Ya know, if it sounds too good to be true....:D
 

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The only reason Costco batteries are cheaper is because they are a wholesaler. Same stuff pretty much.
 

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.....batteries are only made by like 3 or 4 companies.....

Car Battery Buying Guide advertisement
From Consumer Reports:
The two most crucial factors in choosing a battery are its "group size" and "cold-cranking amps."

The time to think about buying a new auto battery is before the old one fails. Photo: Digital Vision Which is why I replaced the one in my wifes Cherokee, just because
The time to think about buying a new auto battery is before the old one fails. Once you're stranded by a dead battery, you probably won't want to spend time shopping around for another. At the first sign that your current battery is growing weaker, have a garage perform a "load test" to see if it's holding a charge properly. If it isn't, find a new battery.
All car batteries aren't created equal. A battery's size, rated capacity, and age help determine how it will perform.
WHAT'S AVAILABLE

Most auto batteries are made by just three manufacturers, Delphi, Exide, and Johnson Controls Industries. Each makes batteries sold under several different brand names. Delphi makes ACDelco and some EverStart (Wal-Mart) models. Exide makes Champion, Exide, Napa, and some EverStart batteries. Johnson Controls makes Diehard (Sears), Duralast (AutoZone), Interstate, Kirkland (Costco), Motorcraft (Ford), and some EverStarts.
Service centers such as Firestone, Goodyear, Pep Boys, and Sears tend to have a large, fresh inventory and relatively low prices. They also handle installation. Stores such as Kmart, Target, Trak Auto, and Wal-Mart may have the lowest prices, but not all of them can install a battery for you. Installing a battery yourself is not technically difficult, but it can be cumbersome, and you have to dispose of the old battery properly. Service stations and tune-up shops sell batteries as well, and they offer convenient and comprehensive service, but their selection tends to be limited and their stock may not be fresh. For cars and trucks still under warranty, a franchised dealer is your first choice, particularly if the vehicle warranty covers the battery. For older vehicles, though, a dealership is probably the last resort—it's the most expensive service venue. The two most crucial factors in choosing a battery are its "group size" and "cold-cranking amps," or CCA.

Group Size. A group size defines the battery's outside dimensions and the placement of the terminals on them. For instance, group size 75 fits mainly General Motors cars. Size 65 applies to most large Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury products. Newer Hondas, Nissans, and Toyotas use size 35. Most Chryslers use 34. You'll also see combinations like 34/78, which has two sets of terminals and will fit either Chryslers or some GM models. Choose the group size recommended by your car's manufacturer. (Reference guides at battery retailers can tell you which group size your car needs.) The wrong size might not fit securely.

Cold-cranking amps. CCA is a measure of a battery's ability to start a car in cold weather, when thickened engine oil and slowed chemical reactions make starting hardest. CCAs denote how much current the battery can deliver to the starter at 0° F. Don't confuse CCA with CA, which stands for cranking amps. That's a measure taken at 32° instead of 0° and is typically much higher than the CCA rating.
Key considerations
Reserve capacity is another important measure of battery quality. It indicates how many minutes your car might run using the battery alone, should the car's alternator fail. You may have to check product literature rather than the battery's labeling to find the reserve capacity.

Buy a fresh battery—one manufactured less than six months earlier. Batteries are stamped with a date code, either on the battery's case or an attached label. The vital information is usually in the first two characters—a letter and a digit. Most codes start with the letter indicating the month: A for January, B for February, and so on. The digit denotes the year: 0 for 2000, say. For example, B3 stands for February 2003.

Warranties. Like CA ratings, battery warranties can sound better than they are. You'll see two numbers: one for the total warranty period and one for the free-replacement period (usually three months to three years). The free-replacement period is key. If the old battery fails after this period expires, you get only a prorated credit toward a new battery.
How to choose

Performance differences. Our tests of batteries regularly show wide variations between and within brands. See below for details on how to obtain Ratings and additional battery information.

What you can do. Check the battery group size and CCA for your vehicle. Not every brand comes in every CCA level. To get the brand you want, you may need to go a bit above your car's CCA requirements.

Steer clear of batteries with a CCA rating below the one specified for your vehicle, as well as those rated 200 amps or more higher than the specified rating. It's a waste of money to go too high. Buy a battery with the longest reserve capacity you can find. If it's not printed on the battery (and it usually isn't), ask store personnel or check product literature. Should your car's charging system fail, a longer capacity can make the difference between driving to safety and getting stuck.

Read our complete Ratings report and related information on car batteries (available to ConsumerReports.org subscribers).

The full Ratings and recommendations for more than 200 vehicles, along with the latest information on thousands of other products and services, are available to ConsumerReports.org subscribers. Find out how to subscribe today.

For complete Ratings and recommendations of appliances, cars & trucks, electronic gear...subscribe to access all of Consumer Reports.

Copyright® 2001-2007 Consumers Union of U.S., Inc.




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BB10 - 6/26/2007 6:20:04 AM
 

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My Duetto is now on about its 6th free replacement for a JC Penney Lifetime Battery (Wow, did that investment ever pay off!). The most recent replacement was two weeks ago.

The new battery fits in the bracket, but not with the original rubber tray insert. That original piece has two spacer blocks molded in which keep the new, larger battery from sitting where it should.

I'd rather not mutilate that original part. Removing the spacers would leave holes, too, rendering the tray useless. Has anyone found a nice-quality rubber or plastic battery tray that will fit in a Duetto battery holder? Any later-model Spider tray a possibility?

Bob in Nashville
 

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I have Costco batteries in the Boat, The Diesel, a floor machine, the trailer, The truck and the Jeep. All work well and they dont ask any questions during the free replacement period
 

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I just have one question. How many people that recommend Optima batteries actually have one in their car? I suspect that most wish they have one in their car but won't pay the price themselves.
 

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I Would Go Broke. I Will Stick With The El Cheepo's
 

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Tom, I wouldn't recommend one unless you're racing or something like that. It just doesn't seem feasible IMO. Like, nick, I would go broke as well :eek:
 

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I have an Optima battery in my 164... same cranking power as the original and in a smaller size. The model I'm running is actually a boat battery that I got for less than usual because opportunity knocked. Have had for over a couple years now, never a problem. When the Interstate dies in my spider I'll probably replace it with an Optima. The main quality I look for in a battery is reliability... not liking the concept of being stuck somewhere because of a premature death. You do have to take into account the fact that batteries are consumables and you will eventually be replacing whatever you plunk down your spare (?) Alfa Dollars on.

Dan
 

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I just had a Kirkland die in my wife's Jeep....bought it in January this year. I don't think I have a receipt anymore, but it is clear from the battery when it was taken into service, do y'all think that's going to be an issue with the warranty entitlement?
 

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I just had a Kirkland die in my wife's Jeep....bought it in January this year. I don't think I have a receipt anymore, but it is clear from the battery when it was taken into service, do y'all think that's going to be an issue with the warranty entitlement?
Costco is usually really good about that, They can look into your record and see that you bought it. I would be surprised if you have any problems
 

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Yes I am someone that recommends and uses Optimas. I have Optima in my vehicle and my wifes car. I had one in her last car too. I will soon get one in the Alfa.

I have never had a problem with the Optimas and the best thing about them is they do not leak. I believe they are a dry cell technology. The only rust in my spider was in the spare tire well caused by a leaking battery from the PO.

In my 4x4 I have cracked the original battery and two Die Hards from the off-road poundings. Yet, the Optima has lasted 6 years.

No, I do not work for them, but am an unpaid actor.
 

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I just have one question. How many people that recommend Optima batteries actually have one in their car? I suspect that most wish they have one in their car but won't pay the price themselves.
I recomend them...
and I do in my '87!!!

BTW, my '80 Scirocco came from the previous owner with a new Kirkland (Cosco) battery and I said to myself, "Myself, that's got to go"... now three years later it's still in there and it works fine*. I'll replace it when I can figure out how to get a Varta battery in the states!!!

The Alfa will get one when I get around to doing the relocation to the back... 'till then what it's got is fine

-Raffi

* I keep all my cars, except my daily driver connected to battery tenders so there is no chance discharge, deep cycle or otherwise.
 
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