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Hi everyone.

I’m having my car restored at a panelbeater who is himself Alfa mad.
Herewith some pics of the underside of his own concourse restoration.
Great attention to detail...
 

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Looks good. I am in the process of doing the same...except not for concours as I wish to drive my car. Plus the exponential cost and anxiety is too much. Great job
 

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Everything looks wonderful! It will surely come out as fresh as when you first bought the vehicle. I want to rebuild some pieces of the car now and I think it's going to be the best time to do it.
 

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I have restored a number of Alfas and removing everything and media blasting the entire car is the only way to locate rust and body damage. I realize that a GTV has inner panels that rust and cannot be seen unless you remove the outer panels. I do not have this problem with Giulietta cars. The body repair is the most expensive part of any car restoration. I like your attention to detail.
 

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I have restored a number of Alfas and removing everything and media blasting the entire car is the only way to locate rust and body damage. I realize that a GTV has inner panels that rust and cannot be seen unless you remove the outer panels. I do not have this problem with Giulietta cars. The body repair is the most expensive part of any car restoration. I like your attention to detail.
Once you 'removing everything and media blasting the entire car is the only way to locate rust and body damage' you destroy all the references as to where the under body tar was.
So before you start any work you have to work out if the tar on the under side of your car is factory correct. You of course consult the body manual to get an idea as to where the factory said it was, have a look at original cars and think about the process that was used in the factory then select your strategy and proceed. Take some photos of your car it may have tar in the factory correct places if you are lucky. That's what I call 'attention to detail'.

So unless you first know your car and then know what you want you will not be able to make the decision any way so you will end up with tar in some places that are not factory correct places like in photos 3,4,5,6 and 7.
A conscious decision on your part to spray all the underside in tar as per the photos is another matter.
Just don't get confused what others (no matter how enthusiastic they are 'Alfa mad') are doing and what is factory correct.
Restoration is a balancing act of priorities. Those that want the factory correct locations will look up the body manual and compare their car before the tar was removed. As well as ask others who strive for factory correct location of under body tar how they sorted out their car. When you take photos also look for the original tar's consistency (texture).
Remember that the under body tar was never black tar exposed.
I had my under body tar applied on my GT Veloce about two months ago, quite an involved process.
Good luck with your car build.
 

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The third car that I restored was my 1961 Sprint Veloce. I decided to take the car completely apart and send the body out to be painted. The shop had the body media blasted and then had it primed. I went to the shop and examined the body and wanted to repair the rust damage and previous accident damage. I took photos of the body before it was blasted and wanted the same undercoating in the original locations. The process is time consuming and can be very expensive. I followed recommendations by a friend who restored cars for a living and was head of a very well know restoration shop in California. I always tell owners that restoration is expensive even if you provide all of the labor because no one can do everything like chrome plating, engine machining, painting, etc unless you own a restoration shop or custom car shop. I have seen private custom car shops that build cars for the owner and have many skilled workers that only work on his vehicles. I think it is much easier to buy a restored car than restoring one unless you have a personal reason like I had. Good luck!
 

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I've come across lot's of people that use the word restoration rather loosely and some connect it to the term resto-mod (a hybrid car). What they really mean is they have re painted the car and replaced some of the mechanicals so a 'freshen up' which has no connection to restoration to factory specifications. They may have culturally dated the car as to what it looked like when XXX owned/raced which means something to people who knew the car.
If your lucky and find out the body of a hybrid car is restored to factory specifications(i.e under body tar placement) I would value would value the body of that hybrid car more than that of a car where they sprayed tar every where under the body.
Like I said before the body of a hybrid car can reach a value comparable to a factory correct restored car's body maximum value (but only if the hybrid car's body was restored to factory specifications in the first place i.e. things like under body tar placement)
That's because people looking for a restored car would entertain a hybrid car(if the body was restored to factory specifications) so they can convert it back to standard original restored car specifications.
It's all depends as to who owns the car and what is important to them.
 

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Steve,
I don't think Joe Bloggs would care about underseal being applied in the correct factory places.
Pete
 

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Hi Pete,
I think Joe/Joan Bloggs want to be fully informed, so they can choose to care if they want.

It's one thing not to know, and another thing to ignore readily available information and a little more effort and still not even bother to put the under seal in the correct factory places.

I would certainly be embarrassed for Joe/Joan Bloggs if they were calling their car restored and they did not even bother to put the under seal in the correct factory places.

Let me put it like this to fix the problem of under sealer in the wrong places
a. Remove all mechanical, place car on a trolley a few days
b. Manually remove the tar over a few weeks(can't sand blast tar off)
c. Prime underside 1 day
d. Mask areas off a week
e. Apply panel sealer and tar and paint under car: 1-2 days
That's about 1- 2 months to put the under seal in the correct factory places and add to that the cost of materials and labour
I think I have Joe/Joan Bloggs attention now, so they can choose to care if they want.
Regards Steve
 
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