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Discussion Starter #1
I recently took delivery of a 78 Alfetta GT. Various elements of the headlights and turn signals did not work, but the PO was nice enough to provide a new headlight switch assembly.

I’ve now got everything opened up, and can see that the switch in the car and the new one have some differences.

While at first glance they look quite similar, the new one’s two wire bundles both terminate in plastic connectors, whereas only one of the original switch’s bundles terminate in a plastic connector while the other bundle uses simple female spade terminals that connect directly into the fuse box. More specifically, one of the new switch’s bundles terminates in two plastic connectors, while the other bundle terminates in a single-row connector.

I’ve started the process of mapping the wiring schemata and comparing flow paths through the two switches. However, if anyone has faced this before, a quick how-to might save a bunch of time.

thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The plot develops...

I have no idea what my new headlight switch was intended to fit, but I’m guessing a later Alfetta or GTV6. The stalks are slightly longer, but should work ok. The wiper switch appears to have three speeds where my original was two-speed, or more likely, the new one was intended for intermittent plus two constant speeds. No evidence of intermittent on my Alfetta.

I’ve got all of the running lights and head lights working. Those problems were mainly oxidized fuse-ends. I’m confident the turn signals are hooked up correctly, but they were reported by the PO to be inop. I found the black wire intended to connect the turn switch and flasher to be severed near the fuse box. I replaced the wire and flasher, but still inop.

I’ve confirmed correct continuity to the B+ side of the flasher, and on to the turn signal switch. I’ve confirmed the rear turn signal bulbs will light by removing the local connecting plug and providing direct power.

However, the turn signal wiring from the switch to both sides of the car appears shorted. That’ll be today’s challenge.

Next....

I’ve now got two, generally OK wiper speeds. However, no auto-return. The new switch offers a couple of different wires than the original switch. I’m guessing one is for the intermittent pulse control, and the other might be reverse current return-and-Park.

I would add here I HATE ALFA WIPER WIRING AND CONTROLS.

Any accumulated wisdom would be welcome about now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For a GTV6, and/or very late Alfetta with four-position wiper switch...

Can anyone tell me the wiper stalk positions vis a vis function? Ie, up -intermittent, second position from full up - off, third position -slow, fourth position -fast or....

up -off, second -intermittent, third - slow, fourth -fast?

Or, some other permutation?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Progress...

With enough patience, I’ve got the wipers working. Whatever 116 this was intended to fit, I’ve now got 1st position off, with auto park, 2nd pos off, 3rd low, 4th fast. The second position would be used for intermittent wipe, so I’ll need to find a control module to add that feature.

Turn signals a mystery. I’ve got power to the (new) flasher, a blinking dash indicator, but no voltage from the negative side of the flasher to fire the lights. Odd, since continuity through that lug and on to the switch is what causes the flasher to operate. Gave up for the night.

New Hella hi beams on the way. Current mismatched units have nasty reflectors.
 

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You're definitely on the right track. I think Centerline (or someone else?) had some NOS wiper module/relays at some point recently. If you can't find one I should have a couple of extras from a GTV6.
Since you're into the wiring...might be a good time to consider relays for the headlight circuits. Adding in higher wattage lamps will strain the original system a bit more than sealed beams.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah. After at least fifty years of experimenting, you’d think Alfa would have learned about the corrosive effects of high current on switch contact points.

Interestingly, when I first took delivery of the car, the wiper was quite slow. I figured it was on its last legs, and spotted an NOS motor on the Centerline NOS section. Turns out it was the switch contacts, so now I’ve got a new motor I possibly will never need. I’ll check their listings for the module. In Northern Nevada we occasionally get the kind of precip that needs just the occasional swipe.

Not a lotta room down under, so wonder where to put the headlight relays?

As I lay awake last night wondering about the major drop in current across three new flashers, I suddenly realized that the wire to the console for the hazard switch is still attached. All of that was disconnected and spread around the car when it arrived. I reconnected things, but it’s highly possible I got something wrong, creating a short of some sort. Good place to start this morning.
 

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Don, we put the headlight relays out on the fender, near the airbox location. It was easier there to tap into the wire leads for high/low beam, and take them to the 85/86 coil terminals on the relays. We used the old IAP kit for a 4 lamp system, complete with harness plug adaptors. The wire leads run across the top of the radiator, sleeved for protection of course. The main power source is the terminal junction block on the DS fender.

There's another school of thought that places them inside, under the dash up close to the fuse block. There, you can tap into those same circuits inside the car. To me, it's 6 of one, half-dozen of another, frankly. Lots of info here on the BB on this topic.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've done numerous Alfa relay mods, just not on a 116. I've got box full of high quality Bosch relays and sockets.

I'm finding the car to be remarkably flimsily made, actually. Fine for weight control, but not so good for long-term durability. Having now spent a fair amount of time under the DS dash, I wouldn't much enjoy the job of putting the relays there. If the forward light harness runs down the left side wheel well, that's a good start. Access while standing up - now there's an idea I could like.

I looked at OKP's listing for the headlight switch fitting the "GTV4/GTV6", and it appears to be the same one that came with my car. I''ll take some photos of the terminations into the block connectors to help the next guy along.

Centerline doesn't list the intermittent controller, although they showed two wiper relays, one marked "int", but both were out of stock. One might guess they've never heard of using actual terminology to assist in computer searches.

I found a Bosch intermittent wiper controller that is programmable! It comes with a default of six seconds, but one can do various things with the stalk to change that timing. Not intended for an Alfa, but how hard could it be? Certainly no harder than dodging this zombie apocalypse.
 

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"I found a Bosch intermittent wiper controller that is programmable! It comes with a default of six seconds, but one can do various things with the stalk to change that timing. Not intended for an Alfa, but how hard could it be? Certainly no harder than dodging this zombie apocalypse. "

Now Don.. How hard could that be?? I think you really know the answer to that! Grafting that onto the Alfa steering wheel hub/column? Are you sure??;);)

But I certainly concur with your avoiding the contortions necessary for the fuse box approach.
 

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Those 116 series combo switches have some really delicate parts, don't they. In the Euro GT's there was some small plastic parts right in the heart of the light switch that I recall pivoted and worked in conjunction with a spring ball bearing type thing in particular ways that totally flummoxed me at the time. That I can even recall that after 30 years is scary....and no, sorry I am no use to your situation but even with the passing of the years I share your frustration!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I buttoned everything up today.

In the end, I had to hang a flasher off the side of the fuse box. Either I got 5 defective flashers in a row, or something about mounting them in the fuse box was frying them. I also determined the wire taking power from the flasher to the center console/hazard switch is shorted somewhere, so removed that to be explored another day. It could be the thing that fried the flashers, but I’m not that keen on electronic flashers that can be so easily fried.

Anyway, wipers, lights, and turn signals all behaving as intended. Hazard switch to be sorted later. PITA to get the two central, lower-clamshell screws into place, but got them in.

This car has a small-OD aftermarket steering wheel. It’s OK to drive with, but I’d prefer an original.

Now to tackle the fairly significant oil leak, possibly from the Spica pump mounting flange at the bottom. Another PITA.

What’s up with the column tilt adjust handle hanging straight down where it will snag a leg when securing the column, and tucked up nice and out of the way for adjusting the angle?
 

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On your steering column tilt handle question--- You should be able to reset where that engages by placing the handle in a position that relaxes the pinch. Then back off the nut on the opposite end a bit with your fingers (or a socket if needed). You may have to play with the nut to find a position that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks. The odd thing is that the long pinch bolt is left-hand-thread. Thus, tightening the tilt lock involves pushing the handle down and away. I’ll try repositioning as you suggest. Hopefully that’ll get the handle to snug up. It seems nicely “snugged” when pulled toward the driver and folded up under the column, but that leaves the column loose.

Oh well.
 

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Hmmmm.... maybe a PO replaced the original thru-bolt and nut with something more off the shelf? I may have an extra of the original bits, if that doesn't get it done. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
One must wonder at the difficulty of finding a metric bolt, the right length, with a left hand thread.

Actually, if the correct secured position of the adjusting handle is to push it toward the firewall, and up against the plastic clamshell, then LHT is correct.
 

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I'll check Mike's car this evening. The photos I see online show that lever hanging down, like you say, Don. As much as I've worked in and around that dash, I don't recall right now. It is easy to remove that clamp bolt, remove the column shroud and drop the steering column down, but I'll check it this evening and advise.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Loco,

I wouldn’t bother. It was just an idle question.

I’ve got the clamshell all bolted up now, and it was a PITA to get the two middle screws nutted up. Definitely a place where there ought to be captive threads. Made me wonder if a PO cut off some of the upper clamshell for some reason, as mine looked a bit modified and has only two threaded holes at the steering wheel end for the clamping screws.

I’m not really restoring this car, just getting an OK Alfetta ready for regular use.

I just found out that the one guy in town known for vintage AC work has retired and closed up shop. Argh.
 

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Out of curiosity, I looked at that steering column adjustment lock, and yes it does point downward, but it doesn't protrude below the plastic column shroud.
 
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