Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Finally got around to replacing the clutch slave cylinder on my 84 spider. I read lots of the threads on this bb about the subject prior to attempting and here's my two cents worth.

I had access to a lift...thank goodness. My hat's off to those of you who have done this job with the car on the ground.

I also replace the rubber hose that attaches to the slave cylinder.

The snap ring pliers are require to remove the snap rings. One of my ring broke in two during removal. I found that 1.25" snap rings will work but the 1.375" rings are almost an exact fit for the originals. I got the rings at home depot for $.73 each.

Removal of old cylinder:

1. Use a turkey baster to remove old clutch fluid from reservoir.

2. Loosen and remove the rubber hose from the hard line under the car. You'll need two wrenches (16mm and 19mm)...one for the nut on the hard line and on on the nut that attaches the rubber line to the car chassis. Have a catch basin handy to collect the fluid remaining in the lines.

3. fter removing the hard line, loosen the nut on the rubber line and remove it from the chassis mount.

4. While using vice grips to hold the slave cylinder steady, use a 17mm box end to remve the rubber line from the slave.

5. The old slave cylinder (original) could only be removed by sliding the cylinder aft (toward the back of the car) due to a collar on the aft end of the cylinder that was a larger diameter than the mount. We had to remove the actuator arm and rubber boot to gain the clearance required to remove the cylinder. The new cylinder would slide in either direction.

I installed the new cylinder in the following fashion:

1. While at the workbench I replaced the bleed valve with a speed bleeder. I tightend the the bleeder all the way in and then backed off one full turn. Note that this step is important!

2. Remove the rubber boot and actuating arm from the new cylinder.

3. Slide cylinder into its sleeve from the by inserting in the forward position and sliding the cylinder aft.

4. Install the aft snap ring over the cylinder body. At this point the ring is simply on the cylinder and not in its final position. Putting the ring on now is easier than doing it under the car. Don't mess with the forward snap ring yet!

4. Install actuator arm and boot onto the cylinder. It can be a tight fit between the mountling sleeve and the clutch fork but it will fit.

5. Push the cylinder aft and install aft snap ring into final position. You may need help with this step. I had someone push aft on the cylinder while I wrestled the snap ring into its groove.

6. Install forward snap ring. No biggie here. Just mess with it unit you get it!

7. Install new rubber hose onto the slave cylinder being carefull not to twist the hose while tightening. I just ran the hose straight forward while finger tightening. Once I was ready to tighten all the way, I used vice grips to keep the cylinder from rotating and used a 17mm box end wrench to tighten the connection.

8. Route the rubber hose into its position in the chassis mount. Install washer and nut and then mate to the hard line. Tighten the connection.

9. Position the bleed valve on the slave cylinder above the hose (the cylinder may try tol rotate in its mounting sleeve). This is the 12 O'clock position that put the bleeder at higher point than the hose.

10. Connect a clear hose to the bleeder valve. Place other end of hose into a container. Note that using a speed bleeder does not require that the conainter contain brake fluid.

11. Fill clutch reservoir with fresh DOT 3 fluid an pump the clutch pedal until no air bubbles are observed in the clear tubing. No fast pumping! press the clutch pedal in an hold it for a few seconds. Repeat. Your cluch pedal will feel very mushy diring this step...even after no more air bubbles are seen in the tubing. Make sure to top off the he clutch fluid in the reservoir as you pump the pedal.

12. Get under the car and close the bleeder valve. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN! Remeber, one turn should be all it takes. The bleeder valve is a soft metal and can easily be sheared in two (Yes, I did this once and ended up having to start the whole thing over again). Again the key is that I only losened the valve one turn back in step 1.

13. Check for leaks while under the car.

14. Lower the car, put the reservoir cap back on and consume beer as you admire the perfect feel of the clutch pedal.


On a side note no related to the clutch. I took the time to remove the ground strap from the bell housing to the chassis as the strap is located right next to the slave cylinder. The strap looked fine but I cleaned the strap and mounting points with a wire brush and reinstalled. a 13mm socket is all thats required for this procedure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Thanks for the info,

Was just looking for "proper" bleeding methods for the Slave Cylinder....I suppose that not having a speed bleeder just means that I have to tighten and loosen with pedal pushes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
801 Posts
The trick is to make sure that the bleeder on the slave is up top and doesn't allow for an air lock on the final bleed.
It is difficult to reach up there with the bleeder on top. I usually loosen the bleeder and then turn it in finger tight after each bleed and then when you think you have it right then you can turn it so you can get a wrench on it and snug it down. Makes for a wet elbow though. I use one of my wifes bake pans to catch the fluid spill. Biskets taste a little funny, but they don't stick to the pan.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,487 Posts
dghii said:
While using vice grips to hold the slave cylinder steady, use a 17mm box end to remve the rubber line from the slave.
Hmm. It's been a while since I R/R the clutch slave... Doesn't it have flats on it to allow one to use a large wrench (I think I use a large adjustable wrench) to hold it steady/prevent it from turning?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
yes, the slave has flats to allow you to get some vice grips or a pipe wrench on it to hold is snug.

Did I mention how I tightened the speed bleeder and sheared it off?

Well, that's a story better suited for a cold beer.

Needless to say, my description of this procedure is the abridged version....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
Great instructional post:) My .02 since I have recently had a slave failure but fortunately when it completly gave up, I was only 2 miles from home.

you will eventially have no clutch petal when this fails. It will go to the floor with no clutch disengagement. All your fluid will have leaked out:eek:

You can either try to shift without the clutch but this is something I wasn't about to do since I would have probably destroyed all the gears. When I knew "something" was wrong, I tried to time the lights so I wouldn't have to shift. This worked for about 5 miles then I hit a traffic light and I had to stop. I pulled to the side of the road and when the light switched and it was clear, I put the car in 2nd gear & started it. It was a level roadway and it lurched forward but started - I then motored home slowly in 2nd. I was just happy it didn't happen a week before because I was on a 700 mile round trip to Watkins Glen and having the slave fail while on that trip would have been a real PITA.

A word about bleeding after you complete your repair. I tried the gravity method but got tired of waiting. I attached a Miti Vac which is a vacumn system ( about 30 bucks) and did one or 2 pumps- took the tubing off and I was getting a real good draw, quickly tightened the slave bleed screw (you gotta do it kinda quick cause the clutch master resovour will drain quick) and that was it.

This is only a $50 part plus $10 for the rubber hose attaching the slave to the metal line. I would consider this a maintenance item and if you don't know when yours was last put in, I'd just change it for piece of mind to eliminate a potential down the line problem - but that's me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Don(dghii)
Thanks for the excellent instructions. With the help of a friend I changed mine today.
The only things we did differently from you is that we put the forward snap ring on before we got under the car as well as the new hose. We then slid the cylinder through the housing from the front without the actuator rod and boot on. We were able to push the piston back into the cylinder enough to get the actuator rod into the clutch fork.
My friend has a 1950 Rolls Royce Silver Dawn and a 1964 Bentley S2. He has rebuilt the Rolls. He groused a bit about Alfa's use of snap rings instead of bolts to hold the cylinder on the car.

Pat Mills
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I've messed with my slave a few times and I've put the forward snap ring on prior to installation like you mentioned.

I've also drove around without that forward snap ring installed and it make no difference. Kind of makes you wonder why they used it at all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I wanted to do that job once without the snap ring pliers because I figured that $6 was way too much for a little pair of pliers. I tried to pry the clip off with a small screwdriver, lying on my back under the car. The ring was almost out of the groove and then the screwdriver slipped out of the little hole and I rammed it into my upper lip. I must of looked pretty darn stupid swearing at my car with blood all over my face and shirt. I then drove back to town with a bandage on my face feeling like the complete bozo that I was and bought the pliers.
I guess I was young and stupid then. Now I'm just stupid!

Thanks for the great description! I've often had problems bleeding the clutch slave - now I know the trick!!

regards
Bob
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top