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Discussion Starter #1
Pulling my GTV out of hibernation clutch plates seem to be rusted together is there an easy way to break free thanks for any info
 

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try putting it in 2nd gear with clutch depressed right foot on the brake pedal and then try cranking the engine over. It has worked for me. good luck!
 

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Make sure the hydraulics are working. Have your trusted assistant push the clutch pedal down while you watch to see that the slave responds. Check the reservoir to make sure the fluid hasn't all leaked out, too.

If the hydraulics are OK, then starting the engine with the shift in gear & the clutch pedal down (make sure you have plenty of room ahead to drive the car) might shock it free. Or, for some real fun, jack up the rear end, start it in gear/clutch pedal down & have your assistant drop the jack!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did check the slave it seems to be working! Thanks for the help I have to get it running to try the suggestions shouldn't be long waiting on a fuel pump.
 

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With the high humidity we have in Georgia, I have had this problem a few times. I was told to do the following and it worked for me:

If you live in an area with little traffic, few traffic lights or stop signs you may try driving the car with the clutch pedal depressed; once you can get the engine running. Pick a time when there is little or no traffic, ie. 6 am Saturday morning. Aim the car in the general direction you want to go -down hill. Start the engine with the gear shift lever in neutral and let it warm up for 5 or 10 minutes. Shut the engine off, depress the clutch pedal (keep clutch pedal held to the floor) and engage second gear. While keeping the clutch pedal held to the floor (important), restart the car in second gear, realizing the starter motor will propel the car and hopefully start the motor at the same time. You may have to drive a short while, keeping the clutch pedal depressed, or you may end up driving several miles but eventually the clutch face will break free of the pressure plate. Then you should be able to shift as Alfa Romeo designed the car to do.

It is ‘possible’ to shift gears without using the clutch but the engine speed and the transmission speed must be similar or the synchronizers in your transmission will take a beating. If you have to stop, something I would seriously try to avoid. Turn the key to off (to stop the engine) and back to "on" so as to not let the steering wheel lock engage. Then you will have to rely on the starter to propel the car and start the car again. This is not something you want to make a point of doing since it has to be bad for your starter motor. Good luck and may the force (of gravity) be with you!
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I do live in an area where that is possible. Now I just need to revive it from its 24 year nap I'm sure I will have more questions thanks for all the help everybody.
 

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Happens to me too. A month ago I used a stick to keep the clutch depressed while it sat in storage, hoping to avoid this scenario. I'll find out this week whether this technique works.

The above info will work. Also driving as stated above and slamming on brakes while going about 15 to 20 mph helps brake things loose.
 

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My 86 GTV6 (owned since new) has had to go through this ritual many times. All of the previously mentioned suggestions are good, but mine seemed to be more severe - maybe the double plate, more humid storage, longer sits, what-ever... My eventual successful procedure finally became: Stick holding clutch pedal down, start in 2nd gear, drive (carefully!) to interstate (or some such endless highway!), work your way up carefully through the gears to 5th, and drive until things are fairly heated. If it hasn't broken loose by that point, start a series of braking slow-downs and hard accelerations from almost "lugging" speed. At some point, it will break loose. Mine always did - sooner or later! My pedestrian theory was based on thinking that the strain created from the high gear acceleration would cause the bond between clutch and flywheel to eventually give way - that, and heat drying things out, maybe. Anyway, it always worked when other methods weren't enough. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it! It still runs beautifully, but now resides in a less humid garage and gets driven more frequently!
 

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If it still has the twin disc clutch it does take longer to break it free. But it will pop free. Drive it down the street holding the pedal in. If on a residential street you can do it in first gear.

When I worked at an alfa shop in Atlanta 20 some odd years ago. I had to do the same with a customers calloway twin turbo. It took a mile and a half of going from a little above idling then doing full boost pulls over and over again. The funny thing about it finally broke free right as I was entering the shop as I had giving up on it breaking free and was going to put a clutch in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you everyone I am sending out the gas tank to be dipped cleaned and resealed as we speak so it will be sometime until I can get everything back together to try all these new tricks I am also curious if holding the pedal in worked I am anxious to hear the results as for now cheers!!
 

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update…..

I depressed the clutch by bracing a stick between the seat and clutch pedal for the last month and a half. This successfully kept the clutch plate from sticking. Granted, the time of year isn't as humid as the summer, but it seems to work.
 

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Good to know I am still in recovery mode waiting for my gas tank to come back. What is your take on the cheap universal fuel pumps I can get one for $50 or $250 For namebrand Bosch etc.
 

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I've had nearly a dozen GTV6s over the years. Only one of them had this issue. But, the bad news is that one had it repeatedly! Once it decided to glue itself together, it became a Spring ritual every year. And more often if it sat. So, expect that once you've solved it, it could come back on a regular basis. I believe that car (1984) still had the twin plate clutch in it.

I agree with the above solutions. After too many glued clutch plates, I did the stick on the clutch pedal trick, and told the next owner to consider that if it was going to sit for a while.

My solution was similar to the above, in that my driveway connected to a circular street. On a quiet Sunday, I could use that to prevent getting out into traffic. A slight downhill let me get the car into the street... start it up in 1st or 2nd gear to get it in motion with the starter doing the initial propelling. With the clutch pedal to the floor, stabbing the gas pedal forcefully for about a 3 count, and immediately releasing power. Full power, zero power, full power... Repeating until the plates released. Usually within a within a half mile I was back in business. The positive and negative forces would spin the plates free, torsionally.

As this may not be good for the clutch, or the guibos, etc, I tried to remind myself to take it out for a quick spin on a regular enough basis to eliminate future repetition of this problem. Even in the winter, I could find a day with clear roads for this short exercise and not worry that I had exposed it to road salt. You'd have to figure out how often to do that.
 

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I found that with six play cars, I wasn't able to catch it in time and hated the violent motions of what you described. The stick works so far, but we'll see if it continues to work with the approaching summer humidity. But, it did work for the entire winter.
 

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Agreed! I had two GTV6s in the yard back when I found that to be an issue on one of them. The second one wasn't getting enough road time.

Once you discover that you are going to be having those repeated issues, you know to start doing the stick trick, and/or taking it for a quick spin more regularly. But, it's that first time you find that your GTV is going to be treating you that way that requires more drastic measures to solve the problem. Too late for the preventive maintenance then.

You're right... the violent jerking can't be much good for the car. Perhaps more of a last resort when the safer solutions don't get it done. And then, only the once. As your car has taken a moment of its day to warn you of what it's going to be up to, it's good to listen to that little voice with the Italian accent.
 
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