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I started what I thought would be a routine job. The cursing started shortly afterward. Someone along the ownership line had put the pin that holds the master cylinder to the clutch pedal in backwards. I couldn't get the carter pin out to remove the pin. I was able to saw off the arm from the master cylinder and take out the clutch pedal.

My cursing stopped and I began thanking that person because of what I found. The clutch pedal is cracked over half way and the hole for the pin is wallowed out. Fortunately I have a spare clutch pedal. Boy, am I glad i didn't through that out!!
 

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That's really interesting. Is there an adjustable stop down there to prevent overloading the hole and arm? I've never looked.
 

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I couldn't get the carter pin out to remove the pin. I was able to saw off the arm from the master cylinder and take out the clutch pedal.
Ouch! I removed internal circlip in master cylinder end to get washer and operating rod out. Don't know if yours is similar...

My cursing stopped and I began thanking that person because of what I found. The clutch pedal is cracked over half way and the hole for the pin is wallowed out. Fortunately I have a spare clutch pedal. Boy, am I glad i didn't through that out!!
I guess you must have been inspired by my post just last night about my clutch pedal? ;)
it was http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/showpost.php?p=411847&postcount=3
Funny that we were both working on the same task within 24 hours of each other!

-Alex
 

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Must be something to saying things come in threes or something like that as last week our AROC chapter president's 164L had it's clutch pedal shear off where Richard's is cracked. He got a new one from Difatta.

Guess I better check my two cars with 5-speeds.
 

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Must be something to saying things come in threes or something like that as last week our AROC chapter president's 164L had it's clutch pedal shear off where Richard's is cracked. He got a new one from Difatta.

Guess I better check my two cars with 5-speeds.
It is a strange stress-raiser to have that wig-wog in the pedal arm acting at a disadvantage.

This is a very rare case where the RHD design appears far better than the LHD design (usually, it is the other way around!) With RHD the pivot is at the top of the clutch pedal, with the load (master cylinder) part way down, and the pedal pad at the bottom. I guess you could say that is a 'second class' lever - the 'first class' lever being the LHD design with the fulcrum between the load and the applied force - but it's hardly first class, is it? ;) I wonder why the master cylinder can't fit into the firewall as it does for RHD.

The handbrake lever also seems to be in the best place for RHD - closest to the driver. Though, for RHD the footbrake has a huge bell-crank tube that passes under the heater.

Usually, on my other Italian cars, various brake/accelerator/clutch parts have failed/had slackness as a result of being on the 'wrong' (i.e. the right) side. E.g. the clutch cable on my Uno Turbo has to pass across the back of the turbocharger, which is asking for trouble.

-Alex
 

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It is a strange stress-raiser to have that wig-wog in the pedal arm acting at a disadvantage.

This is a very rare case where the RHD design appears far better than the LHD design (usually, it is the other way around!) With RHD the pivot is at the top of the clutch pedal, with the load (master cylinder) part way down, and the pedal pad at the bottom. I guess you could say that is a 'second class' lever - the 'first class' lever being the LHD design with the fulcrum between the load and the applied force - but it's hardly first class, is it? ;) I wonder why the master cylinder can't fit into the firewall as it does for RHD.

-Alex
So, on RHDs the master cylinder is forward of the pedal?
It has to be easier to access than on LHD cars.
 

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Half Way There?

I am in the middle of this job myself on my 91 S. Here are my comments on the process:

1. I used my pressure bleeder to drive all the fluid out of the system, which minimized leaks on disassembly. But you still need to have some paper towels around.

2. I took the seat out so I could get in on my back (easier if you go in through the rear door). You have to do this to get the cotter pin out. Then work out the pivot pin and you can get out of the car.

3. Drop the panel below the steering wheel and sit on the ground next to the car by the driver's door and you can see right into where the MC is bolted in. It may be under a black plastic cover that pulls straight out. I wonder why they put that in there?

4. What you see will really piss you off when you realize that Alfa could have put the tit on the MC where the fluid supply comes in anywhere on the MC but chose to put it smack dab in front of one of two 13 mm nuts holding the MC to the car.

5. As someone else around here suggested in another thread, the answer to this riddle is a crowfoot wrench on two extensions. It took me a while to realize that you have to attack this nut from the top, as you can get on it from the right side/bottom, but you can't move it from there because of all the other junk in the way.

6. I wound up cutting the white plastic piece that connects the fluid feed line to the MC, since the new MC comes with a new one. Once I got the MC out of the way, it was easy to pull out the part of that white plastic piece left in the fluid feed line with a pair of needle nose pliers.

So now we will find out if re-installation really is the reverse of disassembly. I'm not looking forward to getting the washer and 13 mm nut back onto the top bolt securing the MC (behind the tit). Other than that, I'm hoping it won't be too bad.

Thanks
Rex in Albany
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I just finished bolting mine all back together. The only thing left is bleeding the system.

On the upper, left 13mm nut, I used a 13mm rachet wrench which worked very well from below in fact made that part of the job anticlimatic.

Then there was reinstalling the pin. I tried twice using thread through the carter pin hole with out any luck. It would break once the pin rubbed on the clevis. I ended up tack welding a length of tie wire to the end of the pin and feeding that through. It finally went in. The tack broke off once the pin was in place.

I'd have it all bled out, but I'm out of brake fluid, so it's off to Schucks...bye!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think mine is a GEAR WRENCH without the swivel head. I tried my swivel head ratchet wrench and it wouldn't fit.
 
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