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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got my little POS running again, almost everything mechanical is done on the car with the exception of some leaking brake lines, and this "dang" clutch system. I replaced the entire clutch hydraulic system (new master and slave, new nickel hard line, and a braided stainless for the flexible), and today I tried to bleed it to no avail. I'm not getting anymore air out of it, but there's still no pedal and the slave doesn't move a millimeter. I tried several different methods, and none of them seemed to work. Is there a nasty buildup of air somewhere that I just haven't busted loose yet? And for the record everything worked just fine before I replaced the slave cylinder, which I only did because the old one might've been leaky, but the fluid was black from the disintegrating 40 year old seals. Any recommendations?
 

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You checked that the.bleeding valve is on the highest point it can be?
Youbcan also try to open the line again, bleed the line until fluid comes, same with the hose, and then the cylinder again.
 

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Replaced the slave and master in mine recently. Had a leak in the slave and then had issues with a falling pedal. Turned out the internal seal in the old master was leaking - pedal wouldn't generate any pressure.

Bench bled the new master (stuck it in a jug of brake fluid and actuated it a couple of times until no more bubbles appeared). Then installed it and the system worked w/o any further bleeding.

Since you likely already have the master installed, I would recommend pressure bleeding and start by cracking the fitting at the master cylinder. If you have already done this, you might have to remove the master and bench bleed it. I strongly suspect your air is there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Replaced the slave and master in mine recently. Had a leak in the slave and then had issues with a falling pedal. Turned out the internal seal in the old master was leaking - pedal wouldn't generate any pressure.

Bench bled the new master (stuck it in a jug of brake fluid and actuated it a couple of times until no more bubbles appeared). Then installed it and the system worked w/o any further bleeding.

Since you likely already have the master installed, I would recommend pressure bleeding and start by cracking the fitting at the master cylinder. If you have already done this, you might have to remove the master and bench bleed it. I strongly suspect your air is there.
That's what I thought as well. I did start to try to reverse bleed it, as I'd done before, but decided against that so I could try and get all the nasty old black fluid out. I found a pressure bleeder on amazon for like $90, but if I can just crack the MC fitting I might try that first. I've never bench bled anything before and never had any real issues.
 

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Quick thing to try: jack up the rear of the car and jiggle the clutch pedal (like, repeatedly cycle it an inch or two). Do you get bubbles in the reservoir when you do this? If you have air in the top of the master cylinder this moves the bubble in the cylinder to the reservoir opening so it can escape.
 

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I had never bench bled anything either, but have had issues with bleeding fresh brake M/C after install in the car. Always could get it done, but just took a while. With as difficult as installing the clutch M/C on these is, I didn't want to risk problems.

I have a motive product pressure bleeder and it has been worth the $ spent. Makes changing brake fluid a one man job.
 

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Yes, that is the one I have. But I like the quick disconnect feature on the Orion cap. I am sure they have additional caps to fit other reservoir styles. Either would work well.
 

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I haven't tried this yet, but the next time, I will fill the Motive device with brake fluid, and force it through the slave cylinder. I'll probably do this to the rear calipers when(if?) I change to a normal master cylinder on my Platinum.
 

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One of the few things I really like about the Teves ABS system. Bleeding the rear brakes is so simple. Key on, light pressure on the brake pedal and crack the bleeder screw. The pump pushes the fluid. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Posted this advice several times before but no one seems to listen 🤷🏼‍♂️
The trick to alfetta is hitting the peddle as hard as you can when you bleed using the traditional method.
Ha! Got it! There was air trapped in the master. Pumped it up, stole the brake pedal depressor from the alignment rack and held the pedal down. Cracked the fitting and she was a little gaseous at first. Gave it some hard pumps with my hand (didn't feel like tiring out my legs) and it finally started to gain some pressure. Depressed the pedal and cracked the fitting again and pretty much no more air left. Gave her some more hard pumps and it was a solid pedal again in like 3 or 4 pumps. Depressed and cracked the fitting one more time just to make sure, no more air. Few more hard pumps and it was mint. Clutch starts to bite at about 1/2 way up in the throw of the pedal. Might have to adjust the pushrod a little bit, but other than that it was spot on.
 

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Ahh, the Teves, the Milano/75 specific comments are bleeding through to the GTV6/Alfetta. Since I'm in the US, I think GTV6 and Milano are mechanically (quite substantially, anyways) the same, while those called Alfetta are also the same, but with 4 cylinders. These are the REAR transaxle Alfas.

Glad you got it bled.
 

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Ahh, the Teves, the Milano/75 specific comments are bleeding through to the GTV6/Alfetta. Since I'm in the US, I think GTV6 and Milano are mechanically (quite substantially, anyways) the same, while those called Alfetta are also the same, but with 4 cylinders. These are the REAR transaxle Alfas.

Glad you got it bled.
Its probably not the way others would classify them but I call any of the alfas with a tansaxle alfetta.
 

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Actually I reclassified recently, as I learned from this forum...that a transaxle Alfa with inboard brakes also includes the FWD Alfasud. These never showed up in the states.
 

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It really doesn't take much trapped air to give you fits, and a soft pedal. Bully for you! (y)
 
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