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Crumple zones

Actually, I beg to differ on the subject of crumple zones. The following is an excerpt from a historical timeline on the Alfa Romeo corporate website:

"The Giulia was the first to adopt a crumple-zone body and feature a five-speed gearbox."

If you've ever seen a GTV that got hit hard in the rear, it will be obvious that there are crumple zones designed into the car.

Another touchpoint: Andrew (on this forum) has mentioned in other threads that he actually has some factory advertising literature on the Giulia Sedan and it's crumple zones, so not only was Alfa designing them into the cars at that point, but they even thought it was important enough to advertise it.
Dear members,

Just to show what efforts were made to design crumple zones for the Giulia range, have a look at these pictures that were taken from the forum: Primi esempi sicurezza Alfa 159

In the book "Giulia l'ha disegnata il vento" you will find further proof of the fact that Alfa Romeo was designing crumple zones into the Giulia range.

Ciao, Olaf

 

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Dear members,

Just to show what efforts were made to design crumple zones for the Giulia range, have a look at these pictures that were taken from the forum: Primi esempi sicurezza Alfa 159

In the book "Giulia l'ha disegnata il vento" you will find further proof of the fact that Alfa Romeo was designing crumple zones into the Giulia range.

Ciao, Olaf
I'd rather die in a collision than get my dear alfa wrecked. :thumbup:
 

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I have a few photos from when I was seamwelding my Giulia saloon. I really wouldnt worry about the crash implications....do people really think this will make a great difference if you get hit by a Range Rover doing 60mph? It'll drive straight through a 1960's coupe !!. And before anyone questions my judgement I work for a car manufacturer and see crash test vehicles every day in the workshop , pre and post test. I would fully expect a standard Giulia seat mount would be one of the first things to fail...or you will get impaled on the steering column!.

Anyway , a few pics. This is Mig'd and set evenly at what looked like a sensible distance. Basically just filling in the angle between the panels with a neat fillet of weld.


seamwelding enginebay by lotus11racer, on Flickr


seamwelding inside by lotus11racer, on Flickr


seamwelding rear by lotus11racer, on Flickr

As to how much difference it actually makes I couldnt be sure. We would conduct a torsion test at work pre and post, say, a durability test to measure the degradation. Trouble is unless you have a rig it costs several thousand pounds a time. Still , it must be doing something....and it looks good!.
 

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If we're talking the u-jointed steering box/column, these were standard on (at least) MY 1974 USA version Berlinas and GTVs.
 

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To verfify the increased torsional rigidity on my Giulia I just jacked the car up on one corner and tried opening and then closing the doors. Prior to my seam welding the doors stuck ever so slightly. After doing the welding the doors open and shut faultlessly plus the car does not rattle on a rough track I use and subjectively feels much better on the road. I did the same test on our Lancia Fulvia 2C which I have yet to seam weld and like the Giulia was the doors are "sticky" (although it doesn`t rattle like the Giulia did). I will be seam welding this. The Giulia doors now close perfectly with just an gentle push from around 6 inches, very old Lancia or Rolls like.
 

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Appreciate this thread, my Super is at the bodyshop now n Ive been thinking this would be good to before paint
 

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I read the entire thread. Even if 105’s were designed with crumple zones (and I’m highly dubious that this was the case), welding the seams wouldn’t necessarily compromise that design. It actually might improve it. To says that welding the seams would compromise a crumple zone would be to say that seam tear is designed in - and that can’t be true.
 

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are you guys serious when speaking of seam welding will adversely affect the safety on a 60's 105 gtv? reducing crumple area is a concern? have you seen these things crash? they are horrific, the whole thing collapses like a aluminum pop can. the worries of being overly stiff is of zero concern all things considered.

stitch weld it then use structural adhesive to seal the seams in between for additional strength and rust protection. the car will improve handling, ride better, reduce NVH for comfort.... and just may benefit safety a minuscule for these death traps in this world of SUV's monstrosity.

if you are worried about safety park the alfa and buy an new 5000lb mercedes... :)
 
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