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Just Changed the rear window latch compression rubbers. Pain in the @@@@, so thought I'd post the best method, which I used on the second window.

Remove both screws holding latch to c pillar,
Open rear window wide (6 inches)
Look inside the pin that goes through the window, and you will see a small circlip.
Rotate latch until the circlip is facing down.
Push circlip off and catch it.
Remove latch, and pin from window.
Clean up old rubbers with Razor blade.
Fit new rubbers on pin.
Put latch on back of pin.
Use a Rachet clamp to compress rubbers until you can see the circlip slot.
Pop circlip in.
Cup of Tea.

This method means you don't have to remove the either of the cotterpins in the latch, which is dangerous so close to the window.
 

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Sorry, I push this thread up because I'm trying to do the same job.
I'm getting mad because I can't remove the small circlip, there is no space enough to push it out... How could you do it? Do I need any special tool or is there a trick to make this job easier? Thanks in advance.
 

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Try removing the old rubber gaskets first. Typically, they are dried and cracked so using a thin bladed putty knife to push out the old gasket should work. Once they're removed, you will have plenty of room to access the small E-Clip.
 

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I did it!
With a small watchmaker screwdriver and a lot of patience, I did remove that ~ò@#^ circlip.
Now the problem will be to install it on the latch, with the glass mounted on the car... Hope for the best...
 

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Antonio,

To give yourself some more room, just fully unscrew the white tightening knob and remove the special shaped bolt, so that the latch is now in two halves - but be careful not to open the window so much that it puts a strain on the rubber 'hinges' fitted to the B-post. I think that the original rubbers were shaped with a lip around the outside edge, but many people use ordinary thin rubber cut to the correct size. I also used a very short length of thin clear plastic tube to cushion the bolt as it passes through the hole in the glass. To replace the C-clip, rub a little oil on it to help you adjust its position (since you are trying to fit it while the glass is still vertical), then push it into place using the tip of a small flat screw driver. It is not hard to do, but just requires precision.
 

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Many thanks Alex for your useful post!
Today I am trying to do as you describe.
Ciao!

PS: sorry for the OT, but... I'm looking for a used, honest and cheap front GTA radiator mesh grille for my Sprint GT. I don't want to spend much money as it's just for an "aesthetic experiment" :)
Can you please help me? Many thanks in advance.
 

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For 'cheap and aesthetic', I suggest making your own, but the AlfaBB is full of examples of such disasters: they never look good. I had to make some while restoring my original grilles, but I threw them away. I do not think you can beat the original design for a steel-bodied GT.
 

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For 'cheap and aesthetic', I suggest making your own, but the AlfaBB is full of examples of such disasters: they never look good.
That's exactly why I'm looking for something better... :)
In the meantime I keep my original one...
Thanks.
 

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Anyway, coming back in topic, it's funny to think that the c-clip is the main component of all the mechanism. All the force you need to keep the window closed, or to open it, is applied on that small circlip. Maybe it's hard to happen, but if the circlip goes out of its place, the window is completely free to move.... Am I right?
 

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One more trick for re-fitting the rivet/gaskets/circlip assembly to the window: A standard-sized circlip, available for $.10 at any hardware store, works in this application. Get a handful beforehand. If you don't have a spare, your only one will fly off into the fourth dimension when you try to pop it back on. If you have spares, it will go on smoothly the first time. Cheap insurance.
 

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I'm not so sure... disassemble the mechanism, you'll see that on the other side, the rivet is fixed only with the circlip, and if you remove it, the rivet flies away... :)

Thanks for the advice of the spares, it sounds like "Murphy's law", isn't it? :)
 

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I'm not so sure... disassemble the mechanism, you'll see that on the other side, the rivet is fixed only with the circlip, and if you remove it, the rivet flies away... :))
You are correct! I walked out to the garage, looked at my latch, and realized that I had forgotten how it went together. I was thinking that the hinge attached to the part I am calling the "rivet", and that the snap ring just secured a disk on the inside.

But as you noted, the piece that attaches to the hinge is held on with the snap ring. So yes, all tension exerted by the window rubber is supported by the snap ring. However, those rings will bear a great deal of force - I am not worried about the assembly coming loose.

I have corrected my previous message.

 

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No problem Jay, it was only my curiosity... and now I hope the circlips will remain firmly in their place for years and years, without losing my windows on the road... :)

But now, here I am with another question: ... if I wanted to change the rear side windows with two windows in polycarbonate (Lexan), do you think I have to choose the same thickness of original glass (3 mm) or should I make them thicker, otherwise they could be too flexible and they could not to properly seal on the gaskets?
I'm afraid that if I make them thicker than 3 mm, they don't enter in the vertical rails shaped with "C" profile..
 

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if I wanted to change the rear side windows with two windows in polycarbonate (Lexan), do you think I have to choose the same thickness of original glass (3 mm) or should I make them thicker, otherwise they could be too flexible and they could not to properly seal on the gaskets?
I'm afraid that if I make them thicker than 3 mm, they don't enter in the vertical rails shaped with "C" profile..
Does Lexan even come in 3mm thickness?

My guess is that a lot depends on how new your side window gaskets are. New gaskets take a lot of force to compress, so you might need thicker lexan to provide enough stiffness. There is also a lot of force around the "rivet" head that supports the latch; thinner Lexan might crack.

If your rubber seals are a few years old, and have taken a set in the compressed state, then 3mm Lexan might be strong enough.
 

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Thanks Jay for your kind reply.
Yes, Lexan is available also in 3mm thickness.
Gaskets are not brand new, maybe the 3mm thickness could work.
I will try and I will let you know.
 

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After some tests, I came back to glass windows. The lexan I used is too thin to seal perfectly on the rubber profiles, and I would like to prevent any danger of "sucking" exhaust gas.
 
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