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01-Engine 03 Valve Gear 07 Cooling- Alfa 164 12v V6 Timing Belt and Water Pump

01-Engine 03 Valve Gear 07 Cooling- Alfa 164 12v V6 Timing Belt and Water Pump
Changing Alfa 164 12v V6 Timing Belt and Water Pump
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How to Change Alfa Romeo 164 12v V6 timing belt and water pump rough draft in progress

References (most of them are also on CarDisc International Ltd. - Home Page 164 CD):
1991 Alfa Service [shop] Manual PA4596A0000000 – 11/90
TSB 01.89.03 Timing Belt Tension Procedure [USE ONLY for oil fed tensioner]
TSB 01.90.13/14 “POLY-V” [Serpentine] water pump & A/C Drive Belt Adjustment
TSB 00.91.03 164 TDC Marks http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/showpost.php?p=265321&postcount=1
TSB 01.93.03 New Style V-6 Tensioner Modification Alfa 164 TSB 01.93.03
TSB 01.93.04 New Style V-6 Tensioner Adjustment Alfa 164 TSB 01.93.04
TSB 01.93.05 Warranty Claim Information Tensioner Mod
TSB 01.93.08 New Tensioner + New Belt Alfa 164 TSB 01.93.08
TSB 01.96.01 Timing Belt Inspection Alfa 164 TSB 01.96.01
Cam Template http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=66906&d=1179330802
http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/164-168-1991-1995/150863-timing-belt-serpentine-belt-tensioner-bearing-info.html
Also see: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/164-168-1991-1995/15049-changing-164-cam-pulley-oil-rings-oil-seals.html

Tools:
Good socket sets in ½”, 3/8” and ¼” drive with ratchets and various extensions
Metric wrenches 8mm to 19mm
Socket 1 5/8” (41mm) with ¾” to ½” drive adapter drive
Socket 7/8” (22mm) and 7/8” (22mm) box end wrench if possible
Cam Timing Template http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=66906&d=1179330802
Torque Wrenches ½”, 3/8” and ideally also a ¼” drive



There is a reason for this long written procedure in the order the steps are listed below if you want the best and easiest job, I know I have tried it many ways.

Bag and tag nuts, bolts and other hardware as you remove it.

First position your Alfa Romeo 164 12v V6 in safe work space and open hood (aka bonnet).

Now unlatch air cleaner top and lift slightly off air filter so it can move later on.

DRAINING COOLANT

Do not remove coolant tank cap or any hoses before these next 4 steps because you don’t want coolant spraying out to fast. It is best to do initial draining of coolant with front of car lower than rear of car if possible.

You can either remove a lower radiator hose clamp(s) at bottom radiator outlet or steel cross over pipe and insert a flat screwdriver between hose, plastic side tank outlet or steel pipe and work hose loose enough to drain coolant (be careful if you do loosen hose on plastic radiator outlet) or you can access radiator thermal switch in side tank of radiator by removing black plastic cover between radiator and headlight in front of air cleaner (one Phillips screw) Put screw finger tight back in screw hole. I prefer that later method and if you are just changing timing belt and not thermostat or water pump you don’t need to drain whole system completely.

Disconnect wiring connectors going to radiator thermal switch in side tank (if original red wire goes to brown wire and white wire and black wire connector goes to brown-white wire and black wire connector).

Position clean wide open catch pan of at least 2 gallon capacity in a large flat drip pan under radiator outlet or switch area.

Remove radiator thermal switch very slowly and partially drain cooling system coolant into pan (don't loose sealing washer on switch) Use large adjustable wrench if you don’t have a 29mm open end wrench [I don’t know anybody who does]. It is bigger than 1 1/8” and smaller than 1 3/16”.

When coolant stops draining, reinstall thermal switch and sealing washer and reconnect wires to it and reinstall black plastic cover and Phillips screw.

Remove pan and pour coolant into sealable containers for recycling. If coolant good enough, clean and fairly new and can be reused strain it through a paint strainer filter in a funnel into capable container(s) such as clean antifreeze jugs.

Reposition cleaned catch pan and drip pan back under car nearer alternator so you can drain engine block after a few more steps listed below if you are doing water pump or thermostat change.

OPENING UP THE PATIENT

Remove two bolts from upper motor mount (17mm wrench/socket) Bag up bolts in Ziploc bags and identify with marker pen. Inspect engine mount bushing on rear head and also large end of mount to see if you need to change either one later. If one on engine rear head is bad you will want to change it before installing new belt as you will need to cut out outer steel casing if OEM rubber bushing. This is the place to use a two-piece poly bushing with inner steel bushing.

Remove front and rear sparkplugs (there is a valid reason for this), as it makes it so much easier to rotate engine clockwise to set up cam timing and find top dead center.

NOW, if lower radiator hose steel pipe laying along side a/c compressor and alternator belts/pulleys is rigidly mounted you should remove the hidden bolt from under alternator and above air compressor that holds the black steel lower radiator hose pipe flat bracket to a/c compressor face below alternator pulley (use 13mm socket, 6” extension and ratchet). Sometimes you will find bracket cut in half or bolt left out and it will flop on hoses so you can skip bolt removal but I would plan on removing and welding bracket if cut and installing a bolt if one missing.

Loosen slightly both front wheel lug bolts while wheels still on ground (19mm aka 3/4" socket). If you have air impact gun you can probably skip this step and use gun later if bolts not too tight. Weight on wheels sure helps if bolts tight so you don’t have to have someone hold the brakes.

Jack front of car with floor jack and install two jack stands.

Remove both fronts wheels (yes both wheels, humor me).

Remove left front inner fender liner over transmission (yes, one over transmission humor me here, too).

Now put floor jack under transmission, jack ever so slightly.

The reason for lowering tranny onto sub frame is to give you extra working clearance between front of engine and chassis. It will make job so much easier to get timing belt covers off and cam pulleys off if you need to change orings and oil seals.

Remove two bolts holding transmission mount to transmission and one bolt from grounding strap if strap is short one (remove bolt either from 5-speed tranny case or from behind air cleaner top along inside of engine bay).

Note of caution if the 164 has automatic transmission you should probably disconnect stabilizor shock strut from back corner of tranny before you lower the A/T tranny as it may not have enough extension for tranny to fully lower onto sub-frame and put a load on strut.

Slowly lower transmission onto sub frame while checking that grounding strap is long enough if you did not disconnect it and that air cleaner top moves enough to keep Air Flow Meter black inlet tube from over compressing as engine and tranny move.

Now is the time to finish draining engine block using a 7/8" (22mm) socket to remove front bank coolant drain plug located near base of dip stick tube. Don't lose sealing washer when you pull plug. If nothing comes out you have a dirty coolant drain port, so poke something in hole to clear it. Once coolant stops draining reinstall drain plug and sealing washer. I like to drain rear bank of engine too but that rear drain plug is a real pain to get to if you want to skip that but you will have some coolant come out when you finally pull water pump off so expect to clean up a coolant mess. I hate to work on a wet slippery floor so clean up good for safety sake if you have a leak.

Next remove right front strut and spring as an assembly by removing 4 lower bolts with 17mm socket and 3 top nuts with 13mm socket.

Remove right front and rear inner fender liners (removing rear fender liner optional unless you have heater hose return pipe bolted to rear head see later steps). However, I like to remove it regardless because of extra room it gives you to get at rear timing belt cover bolts and rear of engine but it is tricky to remove and reinstall.

Loosen three water pump pulley bolts while serpentine belt still tensioned.

Remove two serpentine belt tensioner arm retaining bolts with 13mm socket and remove arm and idler pulley assembly.

Remove serpentine belt and inspect belts for cracks and wear and idler pulley bearing for noise and any play.

Remove lower timing belt cover below crankshaft pulley using 10 mm socket.

Loosen 3 bolts in power steering pump pulley with 10mm socket while belt still in tension (check belt tension and condition before removing pulley bolts and pulley so you know if belt will need to be replaced or retensioned later).

Remove two 8mm Allen head screws holding RPM/Timing crankshaft position sensor to engine cover next to crankshaft pulley and work sensor mounting bracket off alignment bushings so you can get timing belt off crankshaft pulley later.

NOW determine if your engine has oil cooler coolant hoses. There are three possible configurations from easiest to hardest to work around - no coolant lines, oil cooler lines only (both same size) and finally one large heater hose return line and one oil cooler line.

Oil cooler lines and/or heater return line are routed over rear upper timing belt cover and need to be disconnected to get cover off. If both same size just loosen small hose clamps and remove small hoses by sliding them back off water pump ports onto steel lines if possible. If you can't, then slice them length wise so you will have a sample to make up new hoses later on.

Now if one hose/line is larger 1" size and it’s steel line is bolted to rear head you will have to remove mounting bolt from rear head with 17mm socket and extension and slide or cut hose to get it off water pump port. Some chassis have a hole drilled through chassis side rail to put extension through from inside fender area above brake lines otherwise with engine lowered you might be able to get a wrench or socket and universal in over power steering pump area to remove bolt. This is the most difficult configuration unless somebody already left bolt out. If no cooler/heater return lines job much easier to remove rear upper timing belt cover.

Remove lower bolts for front and rear timing belt covers using 10mm socket. (There is one hidden one in back you won’t see with rear fender liner still in place but you can lift flap on liner over power steering pulley area if not already broken off to see it. Use ¼” drive universal and extension to reach it.

Remove rear mid timing belt cover that hide timing belt tensioner if it is installed (many are missing).

Loosen upper and lower radiator hose clamps at thermostat from bottom if accessible.

Disconnect coolant temp sensor Bosch wire connector from sensor in mid thermostat housing

Now you are ready to go into engine compartment.

Disconnect Bosch connector for RPM/Timing crankshaft position sensor near air conditioner valve on inner fender.

Loosen radiator hose clamps if you couldn’t get at from below in the inner fender well.

Try to remove upper and lower radiator hoses from thermostat housing. Now you will see why you need to remove hidden bolt holding lower hose steel pipe to a/c compressor so you can get short lower hose off thermostat lower housing. Believe me it also is so much easier to install hose later on with a movable steel pipe.

Once you get lower hose off and if steel pipe’s hidden bolt was removed you can lower pipe and get some more coolant out of radiator into catch pan if you didn’t loosen lower radiator hose earlier.

Remove bolt located in thermostat mid housing between coolant temp sensor and temp gauge sending unit for black ground wire terminal.

Disconnect two wires from temp gauge sender unit and Bosch coolant temp sensor connector if you didn’t do it already from lower inner fender well where it is easier to see if thermostat still on.

Remove top bolts for timing belt covers and see if front one is now loose or has another hidden bolt behind temp gauge sender. If it does I now remove gauge sender with wrench so I can get at bolt. You can try ¼” universal joint, socket and extension or just rip out cover and break it which is what many seem to do. I do not recommend this procedure as that is so Primitive Pete to do that.

Remove front and rear upper timing belt covers. See how much easier it is to do with tranny resting on sub frame because you now have some room to get rear one off rear cam and aux shaft oil pump pulleys. Also, if you have that temp gauge sender out of the mid thermostat housing it sure helps on removing and installing the front one too.

CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS

At this point you will want to inspect both cam pulley, aux shaft pulley and crankshaft pulley areas for oil leaks. If you have oil leak on front of cam pulleys you have three piece cam pulleys and orings under front hub supports are leaking. If you have oil leaking down inside rear of cam pulleys and or aux shaft pulley oil seals in heads are leaking.

Replacement of orings and oil seals is a separate discussion within this document. http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/164-168-1991-1995/15049-changing-164-cam-pulley-oil-rings-oil-seals.html

WATER PUMP AND/OR THERMOSTAT CHANGE

NOW if you are going to change water pump and/or thermostat, test the three thermostat mounting bolts with an 11mm socket, extension and ratchet. I mean semi-gently try to loosen them. Do not force them and shear one or more of them off if they are frozen in place.

Also test thermostat bleeder plug with 14mm socket to see if it will loosen before you loosen 11mm bolts.

If they will come out, go ahead and remove 3 bolts and thermostat. Leave bleeder slightly loose.

Inspect thermostat to see if it is stainless steel poppet or neoprene poppet and fully closed. If not closed or stainless poppet I would replace it. You can test thermostat on kitchen stove in hot water using a laser thermometer or cooking thermometer.

If bolts won’t come out you have some options – leave them in until later on when you can work on bench in a vise with some PB Blaster or liquid wrench, etc., to try and salvage housings and bolts. Or you can try to reuse whole assembly as is and put it on top of new pump and hope thermostat is good.

Again you have the Primitive Pete option of shearing off bolts in hopes that you can get thermostat housing apart and remove broken off bolts. You may even have to do this on work bench later on but don’t rush it yet.

SETTING UP TOP DEAD CENTER AND CHECKING CAM TIMING BEFORE REMOVING TIMING BELT

NOW, is a good time to stop on thermostat and move on to setting up Top Dead Center (TDC) on engine and checking cam timing before you even think about removing timing belt.

Remember I said remove spark plugs to ease this process well if you didn’t remove them now try with them in please so you get the real feel of engine compression and watch how tensioner if the mechanical one jumps around and will make it so difficult to set tension later on.

Remember turn engine CLOCKWISE (CW) ONLY. If you haven’t been to Sears yet and gotten your 1 5/8” socket (aka 41mm) and ¾” to ½” adapter you better get one.

With your 5-speed in neutral, park is fine for A/T and using 41mm socket, adapter and hinge handle or ratchet rotate engine CW until Top Dead Center (TDC) timing mark (a fine thin vertical line) on face of crankshaft pulley between two teeth lines up with triangular TDC mark on engine front cover (about 11 o’clock position). Now look on cam pulley front hubs for cam timing marks (again fine thin lines but horizontal ones). Rear cam mark should be at 1 o’clock and front cam mark should be 11 o’clock. If neither line visible on cam pulleys rotate crankshaft CW another 360° until the crankshaft TDC marks line up again and now see where cam pulley timing marks are located. Once you can see them about 1 and 11 o’clock install Rick’s paper template (my copy is now laminated) and check that rear cam at 69° aka 1 o’clock and front cam at 72.5° aka 11 o’clock positions.

Once you have crankshaft TDC marks set and cams close to 69° and 72.5° you also now have #1 piston in rear head closest to cam pulley at Top Dead Center and cams in close timed position (if either off slightly you will correct when you install new timing belt).

Now, look at timing belt tensioner and decide whether you have original oil fed type or newer mechanical type. Most 164s by this time have had new style mechanical tensioner installed. If you have older oil fed type installed discussion on that type tensioner will be a supplement to this document.

MECHANICAL TENSIONER

These next steps and discussion will be related to mechanical style tensioner. Looking straight at tensioner pulley locate the reference mark and pulley pointer and note where pointer is pointing in relation to reference mark. Above reference mark belt is under tensioned and below mark belt is over tensioned when engine is cold. If very close to mark it is OK either way.

To release belt tension you must use a 13mm socket wrench and loosen two nuts on studs holding tensioner body to engine block. Top stud is pivot point and bottom stud in a adjustment slot. Once both loosened belt should become loose and free to come off tensioner pulley, aux shaft pulley and cam pulleys. You can remove nuts and remove tensioner at this time to give you more room to get belt off engine.

Now if you have followed my steps above and have everything disconnected you should be able to start to work bottom of belt carefully off lower crankshaft pulley by working flat surface of belt in between pulley rear face and engine front cover. There is just enough room to slip belt thickness out through small space behind pulley without having to remove crankshaft pulley.

Once you have belt and tensioner off, inspect tensioner using a pair of needle nose pliers in two small holes in pulley mount to rotate pulley mount on body pivot point and check if outer spring is broken. If you can rotate pointer well below reference point look closely at back of tensioner and see if outer spring broken near where it is attached to pulley mount. If outer spring is not broken this spring will wrap up tight and pointer will stop not to far below reference point depending on ambient temperature. If spring OK, check that pulley mount pivots freely and without binding on fixed pivot pin as you rotate and release it using needle nose pliers to tension and release tension on springs. Outer spring is thermal clutch spring and inner spring is pivot spring both should be unbroken to reuse tensioner if pulley bearing rolls freely without noise and play in bearing.

MILEAGE RULE OF THUMB

If you don’t know mileage on car since last belt change and tensioner replacement I advise you to change tensioner when you change belt and then write letters TB, date and mileage in white or silver marker on timing belt front cover. Also if you change water pump, add WP lettering. Our General Alfisti AR 164 rule is to change timing belt every 35k and water pump and tensioner every 70k.

PULLING THAT WATER PUMP

Now that you have belt and tensioner off and if you are going to change water pump there are a few more things to disconnect. How you go about it depends on whether thermostat bolts came out or didn’t come out. There are two short hoses between heads and thermostat mid housing that have to be unclamped if possible or hoses will have to be cut. I always plan on replacing hoses regardless of removal method as they are usually pretty old. On 3.0L engines the rear hose is a two step size hose and front one is same size both ends.

Parts list for doing 12v timing belt , water pump and hose change.
AR p/n Nomenclature
60562106 timing belt
alt Dayco 95120 or 94423 size 134SX254
60588421 Tensioner , mechanical
60555347 water pump* alt 71713045 NOW 71737989
60777086 gasket w/p alt 60507414
60808356 hose sleeve to rear head NOW 60573501
60808355 hose sleeve to front head ALT 10129086 NOW 60604023
60615713 gasket, metal lower to pump (paper) Alfa paper gasket p/n 60552316
15248711 bolts, thermostat M7x55mm long
60507415 gasket, thermostat upper
60507416 gasket, thermostat mid housing
60559862 thermostat neoprene
60512902/60574777 belt, PS Dayco 15310 15529
60513889 belt, alt 5050273 Dayco 15527
60571636 belt, w/p 5070425 Dayco 15525
60507327 o-ring cam pulley hub (2) if needed
60610985 seal, cam pulley and aux shaft (3)
60510276 hose, long Top Radiator
60560822/60510278 hose, short lower/mid thermostat to steel pipe
60560859/60510275 hose, lower to radiator
60510277 hose, lower steel pipe to steel pipe


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I love this! Yes please Alfisto Steve, write more!! We really need to set up a folder or something that will be a repository for all this info so that whenever anyone needs to do some maintanance work on their 164, all they have to do is get the step by step procedure from the repository.
 

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Yes, I love this too - especially the part about the real-feel-of-engine-compression-if-you-didn't-listen-to-me-before :) And the hint of dropping the gearbox at the front mount - I didn't do that with my last 164 belt change three years ago, and I'm sure it would have been easier if I had.

Something I did with mine was to remove the intake plenum and both cam covers, so that the cam timing could be checked and clearances adjusted. I take it that with the template, there is no need to do this? Adds many hours to the job, especially if you end up polishing/painting the covers like I did ;)

A seperate section on the hydraulic tensioner is eagerly awaited, as my car has one of these and I have no idea on how to set it.

Like tetteh, I worry that I won't be able to find this thread when I get around to doing this job in a few months' time.

Great work Steve!
-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yes, I love this too - especially the part about the real-feel-of-engine-compression-if-you-didn't-listen-to-me-before :) And the hint of dropping the gearbox at the front mount - I didn't do that with my last 164 belt change three years ago, and I'm sure it would have been easier if I had.

Something I did with mine was to remove the intake plenum and both cam covers, so that the cam timing could be checked and clearances adjusted. I take it that with the template, there is no need to do this? Adds many hours to the job, especially if you end up polishing/painting the covers like I did ;)

A seperate section on the hydraulic tensioner is eagerly awaited, as my car has one of these and I have no idea on how to set it.

Like tetteh, I worry that I won't be able to find this thread when I get around to doing this job in a few months' time.

Great work Steve!
-Alex
Yes, Rick's template supercedes the need to pull valve covers if you don't need to check and adjust valve clearances.

As for setting up oil fed tensioners see TSB 01.89.03 dated 5/22/89 which is a recap of Milano shop manual pgs. 00-25 thru 00-28 much better write up than 164 shop manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Setting Top Dead Center and cam timing on 12v 164 V6

I thought I would add some pictures of setting up timing belt and tensioner on 164 12v V6. We are trying to rescue a 91L that came to us about three years ago with 12 bent valves. It has laid in waiting in my driveway about 2 years. I had heads done last week. I reinstalled the cams and set up valve clearance on work bench. That process was posted on another engine I did about six months ago.

Let's see if any of these pictures I took this week so anything interesting.
Pix 1 shows white marked TOP DEAD CENTER (TDC) timing line on front crankshaft PULLEY face lined up with triangular casting pointer on front engine cover. Also shows you lining up tensioner pointer with reference mark on tensioner. There are three tools involved - needle nose pliers to rotate pulley as you lift tensioner with 3/8" drive hinge handle in lifting lug. Once you CAREFULLY rotate pulley counter clockwise slightly with pliers you can apply lift with hinge handle to just hold tensioner with pointer ever so slightly below pointer reference point so you don't overload outer spring and break it. While holding slight pressure on lifting lug to hold pointer on reference point you can carefully tighten tensioner lower nut with a proper wave thin wave or concave lock washer and then tighen top nut (do not over torque either nut and strip threads) If your elbow is not calibrated correctly for 15 ft lbs use a torque wrench.
Recheck that pointer did move move above reference point when both nuts tightened. If so loosen and repeat process.

Next photos so front and rear cams from cam pulley hub timing marks lined up with marks on template and since I had valve covers still off timing marks on cams and cam bearing caps lined up too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Timing 12v 164 V6 engine more photos

Here are some more shots I took some maybe clearer than others:
 

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this is excellent thanks Steve! bout to do my timing belt in the next few weeks... its had 60,000km eeek :(

stupid question i'm sure; even though the cam timing template is from a 164L, same spec for S ver also?

as i haven't changed a timing belt before, what else should i look at changing whilst there; timing belt, mechanical tensioner, water pump, belts (serpentine, water pump, air con, alternator?), any idlers? what else?

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #8
this is excellent thanks Steve! bout to do my timing belt in the next few weeks... its had 60,000km eeek :(

stupid question i'm sure; even though the cam timing template is from a 164L, same spec for S ver also?

as i haven't changed a timing belt before, what else should i look at changing whilst there; timing belt, mechanical tensioner, water pump, belts (serpentine, water pump, air con, alternator?), any idlers? what else?

cheers
Template fits all V6 12v Alfa engines 81-96.

If no history on water pump and if it has mechanical tensioner with no history change it. If it has oil fed tensioner rebuild it with new seal kit and tensioner bearing. If you have serpentine belts inspect them and idler pulley bearing and change if neccessary. I have started changing A/C clutch pulley bearing too.

Plan on changing hoses from heads to mid thermostat housing and probably thermostat, too if you do water pump.
 

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The length is encoded in the part number but gap and number of teeth is not. I'm not sure how they list oz belts.
 

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The length is encoded in the part number but gap and number of teeth is not. I'm not sure how they list oz belts.
...as 0060562106, in a Alfa Romeo/FIAT/Lancia box :)
I bought that one last week at a cost of around AUD$100.

The type number on the Dayco belt (it has both Alfa Romeo and Dayco written on it) appears to be 134 RX 254, but there is also another smaller number in white, 04284059.

This was bought from Mille Miglia Motors, in 'North east' (?) Melbourne (Edwardes St).

I counted 134 teeth, which appear to be at a spacing of slightly under a centimetre (9.8mm?) tooth centre-to-centre. The teeth are about 2mm wide at the inside edge and about 3mm wide at the base (outside edge). Each tooth is about 2mm deep. I don't travel with calipers, so I'm relying on careful ruler measurements!

-Alex
 

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This is gr8, it would come very handy while I am doing this job on mine. I would also like to see this kind of write for head-gaskets job too.... Steve, could you plz do that for all of us...

-Pavan..
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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Guys,

I haven't got my parts CD handy but in two different places I'm looking, I'm getting a reference to alternator belt part number 60513883 and 60513889. Can someone confirm which is correct and what the difference is? One supercede the other perhaps?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Guys,

I haven't got my parts CD handy but in two different places I'm looking, I'm getting a reference to alternator belt part number 60513883 and 60513889. Can someone confirm which is correct and what the difference is? One supercede the other perhaps?

Thanks
60513889 is serpertine flat ribbed belt for alternator. Your other number is not in my parts CD as it says it does not exist. Maybe a typo.
 

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My '91 164 has V-belts rather than serpentine ribbed belts, so perhaps you have turned up a V-belt reference? I think a/c pulley on mine has a double groove with second short V-belt to alternator.

There is of course the third V-belt to power steering pump - not easy to adjust! I usually remove that one by unbolting pulley from pump, then slacken hoses and move pump with pulley removed, refit belt and pulley together - trial and error... does not need to be very tight with belt in good condition but anyway, I digress.

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Bump bump up again for ke3ee
 

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Thanks Steve, I printed this a few weeks ago and have read it at least 10 times... BTW do you have the same for changing the clutch ? Robb
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks Steve, I printed this a few weeks ago and have read it at least 10 times... BTW do you have the same for changing the clutch ? Robb
I don't think so can't remember but if I do it is not this detailed.
 
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