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Tried it, but not much luck. Was the special cap that goes on the brake fluid reservoir included?
The cap was included, along with an adaptor for American-type master cylinders.
The only issue I had was when the reservoir was pressurized, I had some leakage between it and the master cylinder itself.
 

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Man I still do it the old fashioned way! I feel I get better results than the pump stuff. Pumper on the pedal, cheap clear hose and a jar with fluid in it.
I do the typical farthest to nearest approach! Open the bleed, press on the pedal, hold, close bleeder, release! Do that several times till the air is gone and your golden! Last time took me a half hour after doing the 24V brake conversion. BTW now that the rotors are broken in, the thing stops on a dime! Stopping power and distance has reduced greatly by the seat of my pants detection system.

I have never tried the ones suggested here. I guess I am cheap and like it the hard way?? Maybe someday I will wise up! Maybe not!

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The cap was included, along with an adaptor for American-type master cylinders.
The only issue I had was when the reservoir was pressurized, I had some leakage between it and the master cylinder itself.
If you are using pressure bleeder that hooks to tire for pressure directions tell you to bleed tiire down to below 20 psi so that shouldn't happen.

I tell you a pressure bleeder whether tire pressurized or hand pump bottle works for me. I gave up the push the pedal routine long ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The cap was included, along with an adaptor for American-type master cylinders.
The only issue I had was when the reservoir was pressurized, I had some leakage between it and the master cylinder itself.
If you are using pressure bleeder that hooks to tire for pressure directions tell you to bleed tire down to below 20 psi so that shouldn't happen.

I tell you a pressure bleeder whether tire pressurized or hand pump bottle works for me. I gave up the push the pedal routine long ago.
 

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I have a question.... last weekend when 'm checking all the fuilds in my tealie, I saw my brake fluid lower than max, so I thought I would top it off to max, I already have a can of DOT4 and I started putting it in. While the fluid I am adding is clear, the color of the fluid that I started to see in the reservoir is dark (to say black). Recently my dashboard started to blink my brake and pad wear lights occasionally and goes off when I press the brake pedal even slightly.

Does this mean I should bleed my brake lines alone and clean them or is there anything else I need to take care off??

thanks,
-Pavan.
 

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Some brake fluid starts out dark - I think it's ATE which is made in 2 colors (light and dark) with same properties so that when you bleed the system, you know when the new fluid is coming thru. I don't know if that is the case with you, or if you just have old fluid. IMO, non-silicone brake fluid should be bleed annually. Silicone (if appropriate and applicable) every 2.
 

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My brake fluid has been refilled last year when I had my clutch replaced... so I say its not old, but not sure if its silicone or non-silicone based though, I also see some foam kind of stuff in it floating. Coming to dashboard lights... any suggestions on why they show up occasionally??

-Pavan.
 

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My brake fluid has been refilled last year when I had my clutch replaced... so I say its not old, but not sure if its silicone or non-silicone based though, I also see some foam kind of stuff in it floating.

They don't interchange (mix). Foam stuff:eek:. Hopefully when the clutch was done, someone didn't add the incorrect one. To tell what you have (as long as it hasn't been mixed), take a little bit out and put into a jar, add a bit of water. If it's silicone, the water won't mix - Dot 3 or Dot 4 will. Throw the mixture out - don't add back to master cylinder (obviously:))
 

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I have had generally good luck with a vacuum bleeder I bought from Griots. It seems to do fine with disc brakes, but not so well with the rear drum brakes on my Ford pickup. The old fashioned way (plastic tubing and a glass jar) works fine (even with one person) but takes longer.

I took the coward's way out on replacing the master cylinder on my Q. I had to buy the vacuum booster/master cyclinder assembly, but after looking under the hood, replaced only the master cylynder. Worked fine, and I now have a spare vacuum boost to put with all my other Alfa detritus.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Pump (bump) this up.

See my third post with pictures where I jack body then jack rear strut under trailing arm pivot point (not suspension arms) to simulate weight on wheels (WOW) so brake valve in center of rear crossmember will allow brake fluid flow when bleeding brake. Repeat process on other rear caliper if you can't jack rear of car and both trailing arms at same time.
 

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Will it make a difference if you bleed the rear brakes one at a time, meaning you jack up one side and put it on load, then do the other side one at a time? Right now, I can bleed the brakes and pedal feels normal, but when you start the vehicle, you press the pedal and it goes easily to the floor. The brakes only barely engage at the very end of the pedal travel...
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Will it make a difference if you bleed the rear brakes one at a time, meaning you jack up one side and put it on load, then do the other side one at a time? Right now, I can bleed the brakes and pedal feels normal, but when you start the vehicle, you press the pedal and it goes easily to the floor. The brakes only barely engage at the very end of the pedal travel...

You can bleed them one at a time, one after the other, or both together if you have one wheel/strut jacked up to keep brake valve in center cross member so piston is retacted.
 

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Okay, well I just did them one after the other while the rear of the car was sitting on blocks without the wheels to allow the rear brake valve to act normally. The pedal feels normal before you start the engine, however, when you start it and press the pedal, it goes to the floor very easily and it really has no stopping affect. Could this be a symptom of air trapped in the master cylinder still or a faulty MC? We bled all four wheels for a while until there were no air bubbles. I could try removing the MC and bench bleeding that again, but this time do a more thorough job...
 

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Okay, well I just did them one after the other while the rear of the car was sitting on blocks without the wheels to allow the rear brake valve to act normally. The pedal feels normal before you start the engine, however, when you start it and press the pedal, it goes to the floor very easily and it really has no stopping affect. Could this be a symptom of air trapped in the master cylinder still or a faulty MC? We bled all four wheels for a while until there were no air bubbles. I could try removing the MC and bench bleeding that again, but this time do a more thorough job...
Make sure the hose that goes from the brake booster to the intake plenum is connected, then try again with the car running.
 

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Make sure the hose that goes from the brake booster to the intake plenum is connected, then try again with the car running.
That is one of the things that I checked when I was stumped, but there was a good connection. I bought a nifty brake master cylinder bleed kit, so I'm going to try re-bench-bleeding the master cylinder this time and see if this gives me any better results. I find it very odd that the pedal feels normal when the brakes were bled with the engine off, but as soon as you start the engine (with vacuum assist), the pedal is like a hot knife through "butta"...
 

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Discussion Starter #36
That is one of the things that I checked when I was stumped, but there was a good connection. I bought a nifty brake master cylinder bleed kit, so I'm going to try re-bench-bleeding the master cylinder this time and see if this gives me any better results. I find it very odd that the pedal feels normal when the brakes were bled with the engine off, but as soon as you start the engine (with vacuum assist), the pedal is like a hot knife through "butta"...
If you have bled the brakes good you shouldn't have to pull master and bench bled it. I only have to do that on my Ford Ranger clutch master cylinder (what a pee poor design that is!)

Did you pressure bled system by pressurizing master cylinder reservoir and force feed fluid throught the system?

Maybe try with vac booster hose off intake, intake port plugged and engine running so ABS pump working.

I would be suspect of vac booster if you get hard pedal with engine off and are getting good fluid out caliper bleeders.
 

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Brake Bummer

Boy I just hate it when I have to do a four wheel brake bleed on a 164. I have a Motive pressure bleeder, and I run the fluid until it has no bubbles, and I always get a very soft pedal the first time I do it.

I try to keep fluid in the master when I do minor brake jobs, but this was a major job (new calipers and hoses in the front, new rotors and pads all around).

The good news is that the rear calipers retracted fine, and the one stuck bleed screw gave up to the new air ratchet I bought to gently pound it out.

So I have a car in the driveway with new brakes but a very soft pedal. Need to buy more DOT 3 fluid and try again tomorrow.

Daughter just got her license and really wants to drive her car.

Rex
 

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Just bleed brakes the old fashioned way
Have daughter help with pumping the brake pedal in sync with opening and closing the bleeders.
I used one way bleeders all round and the chore was much faster.
Motive way was as helpful as above.
Frank
 

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Soft pedal means you have at least one bubble somewhere.

Start from passenger rear to drivers rear with even load on rear wheels if dealing with ABS.
Then passenger side front and finally driver side front.

I can usually do this first time with a $5.00 AUTOCRAFT bleeder which works great but wish it had a larger catch reservoir.....get what you pay for.

Each stage should work clear of bubbles within less than a cup of fluid.

If not you have a leak somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Remember you have to have "weight on wheels" configuration simulated on rear wheels to bleed properly because of brake valve in cneter of rear cross member.
 
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