Alfa Romeo Forums banner

21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,759 Posts
I can loan you a set of Borrani wheels if you want to make your kids suffer like you did...
Now you resemble your mom in that photograph; especially your eyes and hair color.

I look like a giant next to the 'Lilliput Dino". My head hit the inside of the targa top when I drove it with the top on. Service on a Ferrari sounds like a painful experience!

Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
I can loan you a set of Borrani wheels if you want to make your kids suffer like you did...
Now you resemble your mom in that photograph; especially your eyes and hair color.


Mark
With kids nowadays. They would never get done.

My dad had the same color hair and eyes as my mom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,157 Posts
Back in the 70's I imported a few cars from Europe. The dollar traded very strongly against European currency and used exotic cars weren't very popular there for some reason. About 1973 or so I bought a splendid fuel-injected 3500 Maserati Sebring from Rob de le Rive Box in Switzerland for a little over 3k US landed in Houston (I was the only grad student at UT Austin with a Maserati. Ahem). Rob was a great guy to deal with, very honest, carefully selected cars. Two I passed on haunt me to this day: a pristine 356A coupe for $1300 and a very nice Giulietta Sprint Zagato for $1500. When I asked Rob about the Zagato he warned me away from the car, saying it was "stripped for racing and had a loud exhaust system". Dumb me. All Zagatos had minimalist interiors and Alfa USA had part #'s for SZ exhaust systems. An SZ for $1500US . . . Day-yaam.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
Back in the 70's I imported a few cars from Europe. The dollar traded very strongly against European currency and used exotic cars weren't very popular there for some reason. About 1973 or so I bought a splendid fuel-injected 3500 Maserati Sebring from in Switzerland for a little over 3k US landed in Houston (I was the only grad student at UT Austin with a Maserati. Ahem). Rob was a great guy to deal with, very honest, carefully selected cars. Two I passed on haunt me to this day: a pristine 356A coupe for $1300 and a very nice Giulietta Sprint Zagato for $1500. When I asked Rob about the Zagato he warned me away from the car, saying it was "stripped for racing and had a loud exhaust system". Dumb me. All Zagatos had minimalist interiors and Alfa USA had part #'s for SZ exhaust systems. An SZ for $1500US . . . Day-yaam.
Small world. Rob de le Rive Box is the same guy my dad bought 2 Ferrari's and the Lamborghini from. At that time he wrote what was probably the first book on the history of Lamborghini. I have the autographed copy he sent to my dad. Plus all the letters and pictures back and forth between the two about the different cars he was selling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
I just stumbled across this discussion.
The new system does not show the full signature without clicking on the option.
Part of my signature written a sometime ago address this issue.

"We need a law, one that says every male gets a 10 car garage on his 16th birthday so that when he is 60 years old he will never have to say
" **** I wish I had never sold that car".
(No, I did not put those "****" up there the system did... )"
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,524 Posts
"The new system does not show the full signature without clicking on the option"

Wonder why they chose to have that?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
"The new system does not show the full signature without clicking on the option"

Wonder why they chose to have that?
I think we all wonder why choose to do a lot of things that they did to the new and improved BB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
Easy peasy: my 1982 Alfa GTV6.

150 hp and 150 lb ft torque from 2.5 litres naturally aspirated. Anoraks can correct my numbers with the exact actuals, I'm too lazy to look them up. Also the approximate numbers are higher than actual power and torque we get up here at 1,000 m elevation anyway.

This is the real reason I now drive a 2013 Subaru BRZ originally 200 hp (at 1,000 rpm higher than the GTV6 produced its peak hp) and 150 lb ft. The driving experience delivered by the BRZ is remarkably similar to my GTV6 combined with a pleasing soupçon of crudity as delivered by a 60's British sportscar such as a Triumph GT6 ( poor man's E Type, very very poor man). All wrapped up in a bulletproof mechanical package, like the Miata, this little sportscar is both completely modern and very old fashioned.

The GTV6 was pretty much state of the art for 1980. The little Subie is far from it for the 2013 model year. Entertainingly, even the stability control is ridiculously crude so I just switch it off. The car is a much better drive without it.

The biggest difference then is that the GTV6 was a truly fantastic drive when released and remains one of the classic drives of all time, price factored in of course. The Subie can never be that but of course it isn't intended to be. The GTV6 is a car I should have rustproofed and kept. The Subie is completely rustproofed and durable but can never be a true keeper.

Supercharger (250 hp and 200 lb ft) makes it desirable to keep but not in the same sense as keeping the GTV6.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,741 Posts
Probably my Dad's 1955 Austin Healey 100m in BRG. I only have one remaining photo of it in the garage. :(

Exactly the same as this one. No door handles, louvered hood a heater and two seats. I sat in the middle.

1612158
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,000 Posts
Probably my Dad's 1955 Austin Healey 100m in BRG. I only have one remaining photo of it in the garage. :(

Exactly the same as this one. No door handles, louvered hood a heater and two seats. I sat in the middle.

View attachment 1612158
Beautiful car with wonderful memories I am sure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,524 Posts
Loved my bro's 1960 Austin Healey, was cool looking and sounded great. Unreliable (tranny came new with a poorly heat treated gear), didn't handle well (came new with Dunlop truck tires, lol), the top was a nightmare to assemble (took two people), had just side curtains IIRC (which leaked), had the hard to balance three carbs, painted in water soluable 'turn to chalk' metallic blue paint, almost zero ground clearance (he had to buy a new enngine pan after a trip through the SW), but still, it was a neat looking/sounding machine. Wish I had it now.

The above 1955 car, however, is really something else, though. Fantastic.

Otherwise, should have kept my 1967 Austin Cooper S.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,741 Posts
Beautiful car with wonderful memories I am sure.
It was fun. Worked on it all the time. lol Sooo fast and fun.

Best true sports car around. Big bore 4 cyl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
It was fun. Worked on it all the time. lol Sooo fast and fun.

Best true sports car around. Big bore 4 cyl.
In common with all older British cars, legacy from their weird taxation rules for motor vehicles, that 4 cylinder was a big displacement for a four at the time, 2.7 litres, but due to a very long stroke. That developed so much torque at such low rpm they blocked off first gear because it was practically useless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
The multiple carburetter British engines were quite easy to synchronize and tune due to the constant vacuum design. You could do it by ear, a tach helped a great deal and two handy tools: unisyn and colour tune.




For me I used one thin dime (as a handy screwdriver for the threaded jet orifice fitting, reach under the carb to adjust,) and my set of Mark I ears. Ten minutes and I had the idle speed and mixture just about perfect. Twin Strombergs on my Triumph 2000 sedan with the GT6 type engine, later fitted to the TR6 in longer stroke 2.5 litre form. Good engine. Used to tune my SAAB 99 ignition advance in similar fashion, get highest idle speed twisting the distributor to advance the timing at idle and then reset the idle before hammering the engine by driving aggressively in high gear at low rpm to see if it pinged. If it did, I backed off the timing a tad. Set the initial timing with the strobe and marked the distributor location with a tap of the hammer on a screwdriver to make a nick across the shaft housing where it joined the distributor body. Then no need to use the strobe since the initial correct timing was marked. Very useful if travelling to much lower elevations and vice versa. I could easily adjust the timing to account for the air density changes. All without a timing light. Those were the days my friend, those were the days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,741 Posts
In common with all older British cars, legacy from their weird taxation rules for motor vehicles, that 4 cylinder was a big displacement for a four at the time, 2.7 litres, but due to a very long stroke. That developed so much torque at such low rpm they blocked off first gear because it was practically useless.
My dad had a habit of skipping 2nd gear in later cars, especially his 280zx. But yes, he skipped 1st gear in the Healey too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,524 Posts
The problem with the three carb 6 cyl Healey engine was that no one could get them balanced properly without a great deal of time and effort. Even then, the dealer said, well, we tried, but they are still off, and will not set up properly, alas. They later went to two carbs, IIRC, as that was much easier. Carlo was the only mechanic I knew who could get close. He was truly an expert on the multicarb Ferrari V12 engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,770 Posts
Yes, I wish I still had my 1st and 2nd cars...1964 Healey MK III BJ8...the 1st model with roll up windows. The other was a 1959 Mercedes 220S 4 door sedan with swing axle rear suspension. Lots a fun with both those cars.
Right now, I'm fumbling, trying to find something I like. I'm driving a Lexus RX 400H now and anxious to get rid of it. I'm thinking about a Jetta TDI Sport Wagen next, hoping that will suit me better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,524 Posts
Well, my older bro sure likes his Mazda 6 sedan. He is somewhat of a Mazda fan, still has a pristine low mileage Mazda rotary engined roadster, which the dealers always try to buy from him when he brings it in for service, lol. He thinks the 6 sedan is just about right, a nicely sporty car, a nice size, comfortable, decent multiple dealers, with some degree of quality built in.

Yes, it does have the electronic infotainment and driving aids, including the heads up display which he really likes (as we do in the Chevy SS), and he has had zero troubles with the car so far, with no problems in thousands of miles. He sometimes drives it down to Phoenix to visit a son. So, you might find a nice used one. Try it, you might like it.

BTW, the 64 Healey had the right stuff, with the side windows, better engine, better top, etc. If the used Healeys hadn't gone clear out of sight with value and cost, I might have looked at a good used one instead of the used LS (which is still a great performance car for the very low price).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,582 Posts
Had a '66 Corvette roadster and a '63 MG Midget...at the same time. The Midget was more fun, the Corvette looked the business.
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top