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Sad news, he passed away. Many of you knew him and had him care for your cars over the years. He and his brother were great customers to me and I always like talking to them.

 

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I first met him in 1963, at the local pizza emporium, Abruzzi's, with a few of his Italian friends and relatives, and a local friend, Howard, who was racing a 59 Giulietta Veloce Coupe prepared by Carlo. I bought his 1964 Sprint GT from him in 1966. He maintained the Alfas we owned from then up through the 94LS until he retired. He and his brother Lino (turned out Lino had married Anna, an old high school chum of mine) were trusted friends for all those years. I would have never kept Alfas if it weren't for both of them. The wife and I had driven our rental Alfa to their town, Mirabella Eclano, IIRC, the last time we were in Italy.

Carlo's passing leaves a huge hole in my life. Sincerest condolences to his entire family.
 

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Alfa of Tacoma supplied me with parts when my Italian mechanic passed away. Lino looked after me exceptionally well. Just a small volume customer but that made no difference. Always personal attention. Always looking out for you, selling you what you needed not necessarily what you thought you needed. They obviously felt an obligation to take care of my mechanic's customers as if they were their own, which of course we were if you understood business properly. Old World service. My mechanic was from the same region in Italy. I think the same village. I also know another relative of his who knows me because we frequent the same traditional Italian restaurant here, and he's in concrete and a big part of my law practice is heavy construction.

All of them are great people with great skills. When we lose one we lose a significant quantity of accumulated expertise. Eventually it will all be gone and all that remains will be disposable and lacking any soul.
 

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A wonderful man who was passionate about Alfa, and more passionate about people. I and many others were blessed to have him in our lives, he was most happy to hear that we were happy and well. Goodbye my friend.
 

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Carlo and Lino owned Alfa of Tacoma, courtesy of Pete Lovely, local VW dealer and racer, who set them up with the dealership years ago.

The only thing I've heard so far is that he had pneumonia, maybe caused by the virus going around. No word from Lino yet.
 

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As of last year. Have no idea what will happen with all the tools, and whatever parts still stored around. Something the family will have to eventually determine. He had told me about renting a garage locally, as a hobby shop, but I had never visited it.

I'm sure there are others who will chime in with more info and are more familiar with what he was doing after he retired, and how his health was at that time.
 

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Regrettably this is true. The business was kept alive for a long time by their efforts and I am sure they deferred retirement to do so. I understand they tried to find a successor. To mentor a successor you need to find someone willing to be mentored which is getting steadily more difficult. That's part of what I mean by the lost accumulations of expertise with each passing.
 

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I remember Lino telling me one day that he had argued with Carlo about retiring, that he, Lino wanted to retire and enjoy life, still felt obligated to support Carlo in his work, but kept telling Carlo that he really should retire to spend life with Fatush and enjoy things in life other than just working on Alfas and Ferraris. I think that in Carlo's mind, there was no other life. He told me one day that he would be happy just working on rebuilding a Ferrari or Alfa engine till he dropped. Prophetic maybe.

It took them well over a year to finally pull the plug, Carlo having so many customers coming in to whom he felt obligated to assist, cars still in work in the shop, and many cars and parts stored in other areas of the three story building.

I don't know how many close friends I've known who waited to retire (some felt forced, so they confessed), and then passed away withing a year or so from something. Leaves holes in one's life.
 

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I am in my 20th year of retirement and have not regretted a day of it. Better to go for it when you can and if you can as many of us have done. Now to get by this Covid-19 mess so I can get my last Alfa down to FL.
 

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I retired 22 years ago, and like you, haven't regretted a minute of it. The universe is so vast, so much to learn and appreciate.
 

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To some extent it depends what occupation you retire from and for how long you worked at the one thing. The key to satisfying retirement is to find replacement activity, preferably more satisfying than the occupation you leave. If your occupation coincides with your interests there is no point in retiring. If your occupation distracted you from what you prefer to do then retirement works fine. Retirement for working people is essentially a very modern invention.

If you love your work and you are good at what you do then working all your life is the same as retiring but you get paid as well.
 

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Sad news indeed. I met Carlo on few different occasions, super guy. My condolences to his family.
 

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Have no idea what will happen with all the tools, and whatever parts still stored around.
I found out about Carlos passing a few days ago from a close friend. It is truly devastating news.

Centerline was able to purchase Alfa of Tacoma's remaining parts inventory last year, after talking with Lino about if for a few years. Yes, the decision to retire was not easy for them. It has taken me quite a few months to sort through it. Many of the parts are available in our "NOS" section, but we have literally thousands more to list (from Alfa of Tacoma and from other sources).

We also obtained many priceless factory manuals and parts books - made even better by the annotations of Carlo and Lino in all the margins. The depth of their knowledge was truly amazing - they literally knew everyting there was to know about these cars!

I wish Lino and the rest of Carlo's family the best in trying to heal from this loss. From what I understand, many of his local customers were like family as well, and I'm sure they are all hurting too.
 

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I remember when Lino discussed with me the pending sale to Centerline. Interesting conversation, lol.

Yes, the eventual end of the repair shop, and Lino's expertise in locating needed parts, and now Carlo, of course, was/is a great loss to the local Italian car community. Still, the loss of Carlo as a longtime trusted friend to many is the worst outcome of all.

I hope Lino is able to keep in touch with at least a few of us. I miss his many conversations through the decades about Italy, the family, and the shop. Maybe in time.
 

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Wow...

I only met the both of them once. I stopped by a couple of times when on a work trip to Tacoma. It was a treat. There was a mythical aura about that shop and those two guys. I wish I had gotten a tour of the famous basements.

I'm saddened.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
To some extent it depends what occupation you retire from and for how long you worked at the one thing. The key to satisfying retirement is to find replacement activity, preferably more satisfying than the occupation you leave. If your occupation coincides with your interests there is no point in retiring. If your occupation distracted you from what you prefer to do then retirement works fine. Retirement for working people is essentially a very modern invention.

If you love your work and you are good at what you do then working all your life is the same as retiring but you get paid as well.
I agree, I read a study a few weeks ago that not retiring is actually good for you (of course if you love what you do). I have a few years before I do any sort of thinking of retirement (15-20 Years). I enjoy what I do so I could keep this up for that amount of time. I believe my father may have regretted retiring at 71 in 1996. He was constantly trying to get back into it for a few years, then I think he enjoyed retirement. I have no idea how I feel about it yet until I get there. I like to work but maybe later I will give it all up for vacations in Greece or Italy. :) Being able to do those things I have always wanted or things I wanted to learn. I think the biggest things is keeping the mind busy and that was what Carlo (Lino) was doing.
 

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Then there was the famous Boeing retirement death curve, gleaned from the information they used to post in the company newspaper. It showed that if you retired at 65, you lasted about 18 months, but if you retired earlier, you lived maybe 18 years more, all on average of course.

It all depends on whether or not you have interests outside of just your job. If you have many interests and are fascinated by the Universe, so to speak, you will likely remain active and alert for a very long time, if no other health problems of course. If all you had in your life was just your work, retiring was not a good idea at all, as it seems you tend to stagnate and eventually tire of living. We have a good friend like that, he has zero hobbies, retired at ~65, and all he does is watch the tube and veg out, more or less, not interested in anything. Another friend who retired early is busier now than he ever was at work, even though he loved what he did in his job. He is living a very interesting life now, exploring and pursing many other endeavors, happy as a clam.

Anyway, Carlo just didn't want to retire, loving what he did, and Lino wanted to because he has many other interests (great cook, etc, IIRC).
 
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