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I retired six years ago and wanted to finish restoring my 1961 Sprint Veloce. I contacted a friend of mine who has restored many Giulietta cars over the years for advise. I restored a 1957 Spider more than 45 years ago and also restored a 1971 GTV more than twenty years ago. The 1961 Sprint Veloce was completely taken apart and the body was sent to a local shop for media blasting, body work, painting and undercoating. I just wanted to tell people what it takes to restore any vehicle.

1. The car should be complete and would not recommend restoring a shell because locating parts is expensive and very time consuming. I have experience with helping to restore parts cars and this is difficult at best.
2. The car needs to be restored in a garage or enclosed space that is weather proof.
3. The car will be taken completely apart and small parts need to be put into labeled boxes. I used to use paper storage boxes but, now use strong plastic boxes purchased at Home Depot.
4. You have to inventory all of the parts and make a list of what parts that are missing. I would also recommend taking photos of the car before it is taken apart for your own record.
5. I remove everything that can be removed except for doors, hood and trunk.
6. The large parts such as engine, transmission, differential, suspension, chrome parts, etc. need to be stored inside and protected against rust.
7. I contacted a local body shop that would do complete body repair and took the body on a dolly to the shop for estimate. I was able to find a shop that would repair a body on a dolly because many shops do not want long term projects.
8. I sent the suspension and differential to a local sand blasting shop for blasting and painting. The suspension was inspected and repaired before sending to the blaster.
9. I sent the nuts, bolts and washers along with the parts that need CAD plating to a plating shop that would zinc black and CAD plate automotive parts. I found out that many plating shops will not work on automotive parts.
10. I went to a recommend chrome plating shop and took all of the parts including screws. The cost to chrome plate a Giulietta Spider was $7K and some parts needed repair work.
11. I sent the gauges to a shop for complete restoration. The last set of Giulietta gauges cost $1.5K.
12. I purchased wiring harness from Lionel Velez and the cost varies depending upon the model.
13. The wheels were sent to a local shop for blasting, repairing and painting. I have a good shop called Perfect Wheel.
14. I rebuild all of the mechanical parts except for differentials which one had to be sent to Jon Norman Alfa.
15. I purchased Pirelli tires from Lucas Tires.
16. I purchased repair parts from many vendors starting with Alfa Stop, Classic Alfa, OKP, Centerline Alfa, rubber parts from Reoriginals, Mr. Fiat and other vendors. I did not want to purchase any parts that did not have a good reputation.
17. I used a local machine shop for engine machining and a local fabrication shop for repairing parts and making new parts.
18. I had the interiors completely replaced by Thomas Auto Trim located in San Diego. Tom is a expert and prices are reasonable and he repairs cars that are sent to Pebble Beach every year. I know that most Alfas except for special cars will probably never be entered in the main event at Pebble Beach.
19. The restoration process takes time and money and I do not do body work, chrome plating, interior work or buy a machine shop because it is a lot of work to restore any vehicle.
20. I know that most vendors I use are vtery small shops and lead times can be long. The body work is usually the most expensive and time consuming.
21. You have to have patience or have lots of money to have your own personal restoration shop. I have met owners that have their own shop for their own cars and do not take any customer cars.

I still like to restore Alfas and build engines. You can send PM and will give you names of the shops I have been using. These shops are all located in Los Angeles County and San Diego County.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I forgot to add radiator, gas tank and heater repair at a local radiator shop. There are shops that repair damaged gas tanks and you can also buy new tanks. I always buy new brake master cylinders, wheel cylinders, replace damage brake lines and fuel lines and install 1/0 battery cables.
 

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$7 American k for chrome!!! Thank God a 105 series has mainly S/S trim

Pete
 

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I would add not to take photos but take hundreds of photos more than you think you will need, I am trying to put my engine bay back together, I have photos, but just need the ones taken at the right angle and detail. I wish i'd taken more. :cry:
 

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The most important point is having knowledge or having references before starting any restoration. I asked a friend for a list of shops and vendors that he used for his restorations.
 

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Seems like you contracted most of the work out. I would like to do this but the expense would kill it for me. Having said that rust is generally much worse in UK shells so the cost is huge.
 

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I live in Los Angeles and it is illegal to build a paint booth in your garage and renting one is almost impossible. I could do body work but, I do not want to destroy my home with the dust generated by sanding and grinding. The greatest restoration expense is repairing the body and have a friend who lives in an area where he can build a spray booth and do body work. I saw his work and he does great work but, only for his own projects. I would not recommend restoring any vehicle unless you have the knowledge and are able to do most of your own work because most friends are not going to help you for very long. I have decided to work on my own projects and limit what I do for other people.
 

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That makes sense given the restrictions you have. Fortunately my garage is very much a working environment away from the home. I have restored a number of cars now the trouble is I dont enjoy doing it anymore, its really an economic choice. My current one is probably my last. Here is where its at today.
IMG_4972.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I could do some body work in my garage but, it creates a lot of dust. I have a friend who lives in an area where he can paint in his garage and does very good work. I still like to restore cars.
 
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