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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ran across a nice set of Campy America wheels. An original Alfa Romeo part based on stickers inside. They are actually 6 1/2 x 14. A bit rough but no apparent fatal flaws. I think I'd like to have them profesionally restored being a bit worn, fragile and rare. A thread in this folder discusses proper treatment. A swab of sandpaper and a rattle can may work on Turbinas but not these. Does anyone know any good shops that can do a proper wheel resto? I did not plan on powder coating them as I read that can be problematic on older magnesium alloy wheels. Can the small pocks be filled? And, any color suggestions? I was thinking a matt/satin magnesium color, not silver but not gray.
 

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Interesting project as I am also looking some period correct alloys for my Super. Americas seems to have quite much offset, probably too much for a Super?
Here's couple of ideas for the color. Gta replica wheel is very close to BMW Polarismetallic 060, original steel wheel is bit lighter from that and TZ wheel is unpainted magnesium.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Yes, the width and offset combine to make the tire rub on the inner fender on a Giulia, at least a 185. These are for the Spider or GTV. I have bought a range of silver & gray metallic wheel paints and one is matt (between flat and satin) magnesium. I have yet to paint a test sample. Another was a matt stainless steel but it had a hint of bronze that made it unsuitable. I also got a can of Polaris silver to test. Then there was a graphite metallic that I thought was a bit dark. And wheels back in the day were not metallic flake.

PS: what media is best for blasting high magnesium alloy wheels: bead, walnut shells, etc.. There are quite a few corroded/pocked areas. Being magnesium, it does not "rust" per se but leaves whitish and gray pocks and deposits (mg & al oxides).
 

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Great wheels Bruce, they might just be my favorite!
I have seen the results of using crushed walnut shells on 'alloy' wheels and was impressed. Not sure how that would work on 'mags'.
I found a Duplicolor silver wheel paint that I really liked about 10 years ago, but haven't seen it since. I still have a can or two for touch-ups on the Turbinas.
Its a soft gray/silver and looks 'right' to me. Not sure what to do to fill in the pits....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried Duplicolor silver wheel paint but prefer Rustoleum silver wheel paint. Try searching Summit for wheel paint - they have over 200. Duplicolor alone makes many shades of silver/gray in various finishes. Lots of other choices too.
 

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We have filled pits and pocks from Zn Alloy parts with tin and it works quite well. However no experience with Mg.
Would be nice to hear comments from someone who has first hand knowledge.

edit; added picture of more greyish variation of silver, white Ti on left.
 

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I just had restoration completed on my set of Momo Vegas. The wheels had some pitting and oxidation marks. After discussing the issues with restorer, I had the wheels epoxy primered before painting them in silver and black.
 

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Interesting project as I am also looking some period correct alloys for my Super. Americas seems to have quite much offset, probably too much for a Super?
Although they are, IMHO, one of Campys better designs for Alfa their 6.5in width make them unsuitable for TIs and Supers. For what it's worth (not worth all that much, actually . . . :sleeping:) here's my list of wheels that I think look best on TIs and Supers:

1. 14in GTA replicas. (I also like Alfaholics 15in replicas, I just wish they made them in a 15x6x 38mm size so they'd more easily fit my Super.

2. 15x5.5x TZ/TI Super replicas with Giulietta hubcaps. These wheels are just about perfect looking. Although they look stock, to keen observers they're obviously something special.

3. 14x5.5x38 Turbinas. Although these are not particularly popular alloy wheels for other 105 Alfas (and are cheap to buy as a result) I think they look perfect on TIs and Supers. I have a set that's about to go on my Super.

4. 14x6 Cromadora Daytonas. Another timeless, classic design. These look good on any Alfa including TIs and Supers. Reproductions are being sold by Alfa vendors. Wonder why nobody is making them in 15x6 so we would have a wider access for performance tires.

5. 14in and 15in Minilite replicas. These wheels have become so ubiquitous that you can buy them in versions ranging from dead cheap to expensive. You can even still get the real thing from Minilite. My personal choice would be those made by Superlite in Australia (unfortunately they're no longer sold here in the States). Black centers with polished rims would look great on a dark colored Super or TI.
 

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There's a place in Atlanta, Ga thats called Wheel Wizard. They have being restoring and repairing alloy wheels for 20 or so years. I'd give them a call and ask them about about doing magnesium wheels.


Welcome to Wheel Wizard! - Home
 

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2. 15x5.5x TZ/TI Super replicas with Giulietta hubcaps. These wheels are just about perfect looking. Although they look stock, to keen observers they're obviously something special.
One of my favourites too, there is very beautiful, light weight (and expensive) replicas available from Alfaholics.
 

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If I had as nice set wheels as Bruce have I would let them to specialist. Checking straightnes and roundnes is good start for wheel restoration project.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There's a place in Atlanta, Ga thats called Wheel Wizard. They have being restoring and repairing alloy wheels for 20 or so years. I'd give them a call and ask them about about doing magnesium wheels.
Welcome to Wheel Wizard! - Home
I am playing phone tag with them now. The fellow who left the message had a strong Caribbean accent. Anybody out there used them and any comments? Thanks.

I'd like to have these professionally restored by someone who really knows the inspection, repair and resto of aged vintage magnesium alloy wheels. For the record, they are date stamped 1973 and all the same month so it's a matched set.
 

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I used them many years ago when I worked and ran an Alfa shop in Atlanta. I don't think I ever sent them any magnesium wheels. I do remember talking to them about magnesium rims and them telling me they could clean and paint them and possibly straighten them. But they could not do crack repair on them. But that was around 18 years ago. My brother just had them do a set BMW M series wheels he has. He also had them do a set of early 911 rims.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
They are all some proprietary blend of aluminum with some varying amount of magnesium save perhaps very modern wheels. I doubt any "alloy" wheel was ever pure or even a majority of magnesium. But I have read enough to know that the earlier higher % magnesium wheels can be brittle and develop cracks over time. Some have even said that running period mag alloy wheels while racing or even streeting is unsafe. Yet many, many folks do, even wooden spoked wheels. Seems like a competent magnaflux and/or dye penetrant inspection after careful cleaning is warranted.

Thanks for the tip. I'll follow up. Would save a lot of shipping.
 

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That is quite correct re Campys.

Al Cosention (Faza) used to rave lyrical about Campys being the best alloy wheel ever made, aside from OZ wheels, due to the mix ratios used in their construction. Both light and incredibly strong. He noted that the term used for the alloy blend was called Electron, and I have a picture in one of his Faza bibles showing a guy using both a sledge hammer and an oxy torch on them to prove just how indestructible they are.

So if all this is true, getting them blasted using media (not sand blasted) shouldn't be an issue and thereafter any decent powder coater or paint shop should be able to make them look fantastic.
 

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I remember the FAZA advertising about Campys and Elektron alloy. It's one reason the Campy Turbinas are such sleepers, i.e., they're amazingly light, superbly well made wheels. Since they're commonly only 5.5in width, you can now buy them at give-away prices. Not so for the Campy Americas. While I don't think Campy made a bad design for Alfas, the Campy Americas and their 6.5in width are at the top of the heap.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elektron_(alloy)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Cromodora also made a Turbina patterned wheel for Alfas. Of a mixed lot set I just refinished and mounted on a Super (in-lieu of the above Campy's actually, on a Super bought from Spain, and mounted specifically with these Campy's that I spied there 3 years ago during a visit in Pinyo, thanks Ben/John), there was 1 Cromodora and 3 Campy's. Also being different strike dates within 3 years, they all look slightly different upon very close examination. I have found the same differences in CD-35's in the past. So . . off to the refinishers as soon as I get rid of this flu.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Good link to Wiki. This statement therein explains the weight difference between earlier "mag" wheels at 11-12# versus later at 16# (assuming the same cross section) - "Elektron is unusually light and has a specific gravity of about 1.8 compared with the 2.8 of aluminum alloy." I wonder why manufacturers changed over in the mid-80's? Strength/durability, flammability/safety, liability, cost, cosmetics?
 

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Fwiw

Not an issue, but FWIW, I believe these Campy wheels in question were called "Longbeach", as opposed to "America" and we first saw them as options on the 116 Alfettas in the late '70s.

I've dealt with the original high-magnesium-content Cromodoras and found that bead blasting then priming with zinc chromate works (zinc chromate has been the stuff used for decades by the aircraft industry and military for protecting sensitive metals).

After priming/sealing with the zinc chromate, I used body paste to fill any pin holes, then sanded and primed with a filler/primer and sanded again.

Finish with your favorite paint.

Chuck
 

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