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[:eek: I'll try again,..]

Hi - I've spent the last 72hrs straight [occasional coffee & toilet breaks] drooling in the picture room!! Now i'm seriously thinking about parting company with my 'fair-weather' 84GTV6 in search of a 105 coupe!....BUT i don't know much about them!!

After a little investigation in the local market [Australia], i see them ranging in price from AUD $2K to $100K. I also noticed the many variations such as GT, GTV, GT Veloce, Giulia, Junior, GTA.... ECT!

Now I don't think i could drive anything less than a 2ltr which probably limits my choice. Although a clean 60's 'step-nose' could probably tempt me!!

- Do you guru's out there have any buying tips or suggestions for me??
- Where can i learn more about the various year/model/version of 105 coupes?

Cheers!
 

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Where abouts in Australia are you?
The 105 coupes are quite fine I must say. Even though you are partial to a 2L I dont think you could find to much difference with a 1750, many prefer the balance of that engine. Of the larger engined coupes 1750 & 2L, many prefer the series 1 1750 for its cleaner lines and interior. I personally love the stepfront coupes, the way the designer intended it! The 2L engines are pretty simple swaps into any of these cars

I think you can get quite a nice rust free driver for around $12K and a money pit for anything under that!

Best bet for a good breakdown on the models is one of the many books about them by authors such as John Tipler and others I cant remember. Or rock up to a local club meeting and see what the members have!
This forum is a great resource though. I think there are quite a few threads where differences are discussed, its just that they are not all in the one place...
 

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My opinion is that these cars are now so special, if you can justify "throwing away" a few grand, it's worth buying pretty much any example that you can stand to sit in.

Cheaper ones will be riddled with rust, but the engines are pretty reliable and parts are relatively cheap. Rest assured, the one single piece of the car that gives chronic trouble will be the one single piece where there's no readily available replacement or the replacement is atypically expensive.

I personally think your first 105 should be a rusty hack that you fling around and totally fall in love with, then bitterly come to accept it's not a restoration candidate, then sell it to some bitter old ex-hippy for what you originally paid for it. Then your second one you spend $30K restoring until it's glorious and exactly the way you want it.

Be careful which 105 you drive first, because there's a good chance your mind and heart will decide that's "your Alfa" and you could end up like me - driving a 2000 auto!
 

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Like anything, buy the best one you can afford. Rust is the only real show stopper for these cars. As was said earlier, be careful when test driving, you're likely to fall for the first one you drive without realizing even bad ones can be great drivers.

Last, don't rule out any of the cars based on the displacement, even 105 1300's make for spirited drivers, and an engine swap to a 2 liter is fairly straightforward even for early cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'd better not rush??

Thanks for the replies!

Looks like i have myself plenty of reading to do!! I'd prefer to buy right the first time,.. if possible [read: if lucky!!!] :)

I'm in Melbourne and although i'm not buying for investment purposes, it seems that American & Aussie muscle cars have soared in value - Perhaps the classic Italians are due?!?!

Hopefully i'll find one that 'could' be a daily driver straight off the bat and 'could' be a show car with 'a little' work!!! I guess like any alfa rust = money pit!! Let's hope the hard part is selling the GVT6 :(
 

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a few tips

1. Read everything you can find about Alfas. Pat Braden's books are especially informative.

2. Talk to everyone you can find who knows about Alfas. Fortunately, there's a great Alfa community in OZ so that won't be so hard. Ask questions!

3. If possible find some very good cars and give them a close examination. If possible go for a ride or, even better, drive one yourself.

4. Make friends with the local Alfa specialists in Melbourne and take whatever car you find to them before making a decision on buying. Do this even if you are mechanically skilled but relatively uninformed about Alfas. If you aren't particularly skilled (i.e., can't/don't work on cars yourself) then this rule should be absolute. Alternatively, you can also have a local, informed, enthusiast look the car over before you buy it.

5. Remember that most of these cars are pushing 40 now and that immediate apperances can be deceptive. When you are shown a car, look for some telltales: open the trunk/boot and look at the welds around the rear fenders and rear panel. If you see any distortion, rough welds, filler, etc., the car's been hit and repaired. Open the hood/bonnet and look at where the front fenders and front panel are attached. Are the corners straight and original or do the have rough welds and---even---jagged pieces of metal showing. I mention this because a lot of these cars have passed through uncaring hands on their way to becoming recognized classics. (If a car has been noticeably hit on all four corners---avoid it.) This is something you can do yourself before you waste time taking a less than good car to a specialist for a thorough $$$ evaluation.

6. When driving the car, note whether it feels as solid as the really good cars you sampled. If it feels wiggly at the rear or you probably need a suspension overhaul (quite common). Does the front suspension make noise? Same problem.

7. When driving the car, don't worry too much if it smokes a little under hard acceleration or even a bit on the overrun. Alfas always smoke a little. If the car smokes a lot or has a noisy motor, it will need engine work of course. If you can do the work yourself, it's relatively cheap. Paying someone to do it professionally is expensive. The same goes for the transmission. Alfas often have a scratchy 2nd gear syncro which will make the car harder to drive and enjoy.

8. As others have said, buy the very best car you can find for your first Alfa. I'm a little biased because I have one, but, IMHO, the 1750GTV is a better choice than a 2000. However don't pass up a good 1600 or 2000 if one drops in your lap. They're hard to find, too, and you may have to wait a long time to find a good 1750 for decent money.

9. Period mods are not really Alfa heresy. A lot of earlier cars have 1750/2000 motors, uprated suspensions, faster motors, minilites, Recaros,
even later twin spark motors, etc. Properly done, these can make a enjoyable car even better. Just my opinion, of course. On the other hand I'd avoid cars that are weird; zebra interiors (saw one once) :) taxi cab quality paint, other maker's motors, etc, usually don't wear well on 2nd owners.

10. Do not, under any circumstances, allow yourself to be so romanced by whatever you find, that you buy a bad car. Unless you really know what you are looking at, a car might appear to need a "little of this and that" when, in fact, it needs thousands in repairs before it becomes a car you can truly enjoy. I mention this because of personal experience: I almost bought a rust bucket GTV because I really, really, wanted one and this was the only thing I found. Fortunately, some other fool bought it before I could reach a deal with the dealer.

Good luch on finding your car!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
1750 V 2000?

That all sounds like good advice - thanks 180OUT!

8. As others have said, buy the very best car you can find for your first Alfa. I'm a little biased because I have one, but, IMHO, the 1750GTV is a better choice than a 2000. However don't pass up a good 1600 or 2000 if one drops in your lap. They're hard to find, too, and you may have to wait a long time to find a good 1750 for decent money.
Is that only because you have one?!?!?!?!?........ care to elaborate??
 

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GeeTV: The conventional wisdom re: AlfaGTV's is that the 1750 is a "sweeter" car with better overall dynamics than either the 1600 or
2000. Part of this has to do with the 1750's motor which has the high revving snap of a 1600 and almost approaches the HP of a 2000 motor.
Two liter motors, in contrast, don't provide the tactile excitement of the 1750, although they do, especially when modified, produce more HP.
The European version of the 1750 (which I have) is, in stock form, a much more satisfying car than the American versions, IMHO. The 10.1 cams, higher compression (9.5 to 1), and 4.11 gears make for a very satisfying ride.

Personally, I like the overall design of the 1750GTV better than its other siblings. The interior on my Series 2 car has modern Alfa seats but also a dash/facia that is a much more cohesive design than the plastic version on the 2000.

I've owned my car for over 20 years and I'm only the second owner (the frist was a friend I recommended the car to when it was almost new). For years it was a daily driver and was absolutely reliable. The car's been in dry storage for several years but, as soon as I get some repairs done to my house, I can start working on getting it roadworthy. It's going to need a thorough rebuild, stopping (I hope) short of a full restoration.

I hope I don't sound too picky about this. Given a range of cars in the same condition, I'd probably choose a 1750GTV. However, as I said in my other post, if you find a great 1600 or 2000 don't hesitate to buy it if it meets your needs (the same goes for Jr.'s, both 1300 and 1600's). GTV's are, in just about any configuration, enormously enjoyable cars. The first time I saw my first Sprint GT in about 1964---I thought it was a perfect design. I still think so today.

Hope this helps. :)
 

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Buying Tips for 105 Coupes

[:eek: I'll try again,..]

Hi - I've spent the last 72hrs straight [occasional coffee & toilet breaks] drooling in the picture room!! Now i'm seriously thinking about parting company with my 'fair-weather' 84GTV6 in search of a 105 coupe!....BUT i don't know much about them!!

After a little investigation in the local market [Australia], i see them ranging in price from AUD $2K to $100K. I also noticed the many variations such as GT, GTV, GT Veloce, Giulia, Junior, GTA.... ECT!

Now I don't think i could drive anything less than a 2ltr which probably limits my choice. Although a clean 60's 'step-nose' could probably tempt me!!

- Do you guru's out there have any buying tips or suggestions for me??
- Where can i learn more about the various year/model/version of 105 coupes?

Cheers!
Well, I'd say you're an addict and doomed as far as Alfas. One book that has not been mentioned that will probably give you pictures, text, and an overall view of the various years and models is Joe Benson's Alfa Romeo Buyer's Guide. There are three editions of the book.

You've received some excellent advice on what to look for, windshield rust is another important area to check; lift the floor mats and see if the bottom is rusted or has holes. What you spend will depend on your skill level and what additional money you have to put into repairs. Everything is ultimately restoreable at a cost. The less skill you have the more you will spend paying others to fix things. By all means take some one with you if you're afraid you'll fall for the first car. Let them hold your wallet or check book.

I hate to give too much advice since what I consider restoreable or acceptable at a price based on my experience with Pat may be very different from what you have in mind or find acceptable. Do heed the others advice; buy the best car that you can afford rather than a cheaper one that may frustrate you quickly with the amount of money spent on necessary repairs and cosmetics that may actually disenchant you with Alfa as a marque.

Happy Alfa shopping.
 
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