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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Work on making the 2000 Spider road worthy continues. We are now working on getting the clutch hydraulics in shape. My car has 2 reservoirs installed, one for brake (the normal looking "Girling type" can on the left side of the car), and the plastic one further to the right and lower. Besides the plastic one not looking correct, I seem to remember reading somewhere that they actually only used 1 Girling reservoir with 2 compartments.

I'd appreciate your advise on what would be correct

Thanks

Henry

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Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Gas Auto part Electrical wiring
 

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HOWEVER....

If your car was originally delivered to France, they had two reservoirs, one in clear glass.

Most other cars had a single reservoir, with two steel tubes screwed onto the dual outlets on the bottom. Not rubber hoses. Inside the reservoir was a stand-tube that would prevent a leak from taking out both circuits. Without guidance to the contrary, I always assumed the tube fed the brake system, as it had the least exposure to potential leaks.

I gave a couple of used but usable reservoirs to APE. One of them I was in the process of brazing all of the seams so I could powder coat it, thus improving the paint's resistance to peeling from brake fluid exposure. The original reservoirs were soldered, and thus not resistant to the temperatures used in powder coating.
 

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BTW... you've got a relay mounted just below the fuse box. There is a relay missing from just behind the fluid reservoir, screwed to the inside of structural frame also supporting the reservoir. It is possible someone relocated the relay when they were fussing about with the hydraulics. Of course, it's also possible Touring just changed their mind on the location. If you look on the inside face of that structure and see two, unused screw holes, you'll know which it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Don, as always a wealth of knowledge!

My car was delivered new to Mexico so I assume no glass reservoir.

Thanks on the "heads up" with the relay, I will make note of it

Henry
 

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Also...

Reservoir normally mounted higher with two steel fluid lines headed downward. I've seen the two straddling the steering column, or both passing by on the inside. The visible "tab" above the reservoir may be the remains of the original mounting strap for the reservoir. You, like most, are missing the heat shield that keeps the brake fluid from getting too hot.

Your rubber engine mount isn't original configuration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Don, yes, the heat shield is missing, I need to be on the lookout for one (not easy to find, I know). Thanks for pointing th rest of the items out.

Regarding the glass reservoir, is this what they look like? This one is form my Alpine A110

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Hello Henry,

My 2000 is a French import, via Renault (I guess they were the Alfa importer at the time?). At least that's what the additional vin/data plate indicates. In any case, in answer to your question - yes, that is what the glass reservoir on a French import 2000 looks like.

All the best....Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello Henry,

My 2000 is a French import, via Renault (I guess they were the Alfa importer at the time?). At least that's what the additional vin/data plate indicates. In any case, in answer to your question - yes, that is what the glass reservoir on a French import 2000 looks like.

All the best....Dan

Thanks Dan!
 

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All of what Don said, plus pictures of Serge's French 102 Spider in this thread and discussion in this thread.

BTW, I tend to believe the reservoir's brand name 'Nivoclair' is a phonetic play on 'niveau clair' which translates to 'clear level' as in 'one can clearly see the level of the brake fluid'.
 

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FWIW...

The Touring cars, to my knowledge, did not differentiate the intended market destination via different serial numbers. In the case of the 2L, the catalogs refer to European and US market for individual components, such as gauges, hood, and trim. Even so, Hoffman advertisements offered Euro side trim as an option.

My last 102 was custom ordered by an American living in Europe, delivered to a Belgian dealer with US hood and trim, but metric gauges and without overriders on the bumpers.

My point...

It seems entirely possible a person living in Mexico could have bought a car while traveling in France, or via a Renault dealer in Mexico, and received a car configured for the French market. What would a person do if the glass bottle broke? Local wrecking yard for a suitable fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I suppose you could be right Don. My car was imported to Mexico by the local AR dealer in Mexico City. It has European market options all around. But I don't rule out the French theory
 

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HOWEVER....

If your car was originally delivered to France, they had two reservoirs, one in clear glass.

Most other cars had a single reservoir, with two steel tubes screwed onto the dual outlets on the bottom. Not rubber hoses. Inside the reservoir was a stand-tube that would prevent a leak from taking out both circuits. Without guidance to the contrary, I always assumed the tube fed the brake system, as it had the least exposure to potential leaks.

I gave a couple of used but usable reservoirs to APE. One of them I was in the process of brazing all of the seams so I could powder coat it, thus improving the paint's resistance to peeling from brake fluid exposure. The original reservoirs were soldered, and thus not resistant to the temperatures used in powder coating.
Hey Don: Why does the brake system have less exposure to potential leaks? I'm asking because I developed a pinhole leak in the hard line between the clutch master and slave and I fear that a failure in the brake system is next. The lines are original and the fittings are frozen. It will be a big job to replace the lot.
 

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Hey Don: Why does the brake system have less exposure to potential leaks? I'm asking because I developed a pinhole leak in the hard line between the clutch master and slave and I fear that a failure in the brake system is next. The lines are original and the fittings are frozen. It will be a big job to replace the lot.
My comment about less exposure to leaks was pointed at the reservoir only.

The reservoir is a simple can with an inner tube. The fluid in the tube feeds one outlet and the fluid surrounding the tube feeds the other outlet. The outer fluid could escape from any pinhole in the can, or a ruptured seam, but the fluid in the tube has essentially no exposure to an external surface.

If your steel lines to the clutch or brake system have failed, you'll have to make new ones.
 

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My comment about less exposure to leaks was pointed at the reservoir only.

The reservoir is a simple can with an inner tube. The fluid in the tube feeds one outlet and the fluid surrounding the tube feeds the other outlet. The outer fluid could escape from any pinhole in the can, or a ruptured seam, but the fluid in the tube has essentially no exposure to an external surface.

If your steel lines to the clutch or brake system have failed, you'll have to make new ones.
Ah. Gotcha. Thanks. My brake lines haven’t failed yet but they’re either original or 80s era. Either way, I’m thinking discretion is the better part of valor here and I should bite the bellet and redo the lot. Or get really good at engine-breaking and invest in an anchor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The ones on my car were replaced by rubber hoses when the original can failed I suppose.

I also have a nos original master brake cylinder and a non original clutch slave cylinder with a bracket adapted to it :rolleyes:

So a lot of work needs to go into re-doing the hydraulic system…

Aldo the clutch pedal is very hard, don’t know what that is about

Any ideas?

Thanks

Ah. Gotcha. Thanks. My brake lines haven’t failed yet but they’re either original or 80s era. Either way, I’m thinking discretion is the better part of valor here and I should bite the bellet and redo the lot. Or get really good at engine-breaking and invest in an anchor.
 

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I have found when owning and driving two or three Alfas at one time that I'm frequently surprised by the pedal pressure differences between cars. Normally, after a drive or two, they feel normal again.

The 102-2000 can be fitted with a 2600 pressure plate, making it heavier. I modified the flywheel on my 2300 to accept either the original Spring-type or the later diaphragm. I liked the diaphragm best.

The pivot shaft in the bell housing can be very stiff if it has sat, unused, for a long time. Use some penetrating oil and manually operate the shaft until it fees up.
 

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Henry
Regards to your comment about the clutch pedal being hard to operate, I have had a similar issue with the recent recommissioning of my 1959 2000 that had been in storage for over 45 years.
I got a new master cylinder and slave cylinder from Classic Alfa and fitted these to my car. The master cylinder was an easy replacement, but the slave cylinder supplied was incorrect as the position of the pipe fitting and bleed screw was different. This would have required a longer flexible line to the slave cylinder to compensate for the different parts.
I decided to sleeve the original slave cylinder and fitted the new master. The clutch pedal was heavy and the wife couldn’t drive the car. Upon questioning the supplier, it was found that the original master cylinder was .625” dia. And the new was .750” dia. 2 sizes larger.
A .625 dia girling master cylinder was purchased from Pegasus racing and fitted. The clutch is now very easy and positive in its action.

As regards to the original style fluid reservoir fitted to my car, the clutch is piped to the front fitting, that is supplied from the internal tube, and the brake master is connected to the rear fitting that is supplied from the larger chamber of the reservoir.

best with your project.
Steve
 
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