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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
just wondering how much a complete Motronic 4.1 system would be worth? It came off a 1990 1.7 16V, and everything was working perfectly as far as I could tell, and I've labelled every connection. I'm not actually offering to sell it as yet because I'm planning to put the 16v motor into my S1 33 (why you ask? long story) and I would rather use carbys, but I might end up having to Fuel inject it. So I'm just wondering how much $$ I could expect to get for the injection system? This includes throttle bodies, linkages, injectors, lines, manifold, all sensors, ECU, wiring harness and air filter
 

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Hey guys,
just wondering how much a complete Motronic 4.1 system would be worth? It came off a 1990 1.7 16V, and everything was working perfectly as far as I could tell, and I've labelled every connection. I'm not actually offering to sell it as yet because I'm planning to put the 16v motor into my S1 33 (why you ask? long story) and I would rather use carbys, but I might end up having to Fuel inject it. So I'm just wondering how much $$ I could expect to get for the injection system? This includes throttle bodies, linkages, injectors, lines, manifold, all sensors, ECU, wiring harness and air filter
While not a direct comparison, I sold the Motronic wiring loom, AFM, crank angle sensor (but not the 60-2 wheel on the harmonic balancer) and computer from my 1990 model 75 Potenziata for $450.
The stuff you want to sell is really only relevant to the same engine it came from.
That being said, be careful of believing this stuff is worth heaps, it's very easy to attach some mythical value to these parts and have them sitting there for years on end with its real value constantly dropping.
Also, I think you'll find that any emissions regulations that apply are for the engines year of manufacture rather than the cars. You can't get a late model 33 and drop a carby fed Sud engine into it, but you can get a Sud and drop a late model 33 engine into it as long as the emissions equipment from the 33 is all there and functional.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Also, I think you'll find that any emissions regulations that apply are for the engines year of manufacture rather than the cars. You can't get a late model 33 and drop a carby fed Sud engine into it, but you can get a Sud and drop a late model 33 engine into it as long as the emissions equipment from the 33 is all there and functional.
Are you saying I can transplant the 16v motor, but only if I keep it fuel injected?
 

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To be totally legal, all of the factory systems (computer, catalytic converter and evaporative emmisions stuff (charcoal canister and its plumbing)) from the donor car would have be adapted to the other car.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How do people get around this with aftermarket injection systems?? In any case, I'm not too worried. The original car was pre cat, and the extra economy of efi would be nice. I'm just looking at my options. I've never heard of a charcoal canister though, what is that?
 

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How do people get around this with aftermarket injection systems?? In any case, I'm not too worried. The original car was pre cat, and the extra economy of efi would be nice. I'm just looking at my options. I've never heard of a charcoal canister though, what is that?
Typically they don't :eek:.
The charcoal canister is part of the evaporative emissions control that absorbs petrol vapors from the tank. Ever had a car give off a bit of a hiss when you take the fuel cap off or sit there and wreak of petrol fumes, especially when the tank level is really low? That happens when the evaporative emissions system isn't working properly. The engine draws these fumes out of the tank via the charcoal canister. The tank isn't subjected to full manifold vacuum (it would collapse is you tried to do that.) but there is enough manifold vacuum there to suck out the evaporated fuel. The control of that typically falls under the direction of a solenoid valve that is opened and closed by the computer.
 
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