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What is everyone's best modification done to their Milano? Mine was the alternator upgrade. Anyone?
 

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Geometry fix and extra front spring rate. :thumbup:
 

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We put the full Shankle suspension kit, torsion bars, springs, stab bars, on ours which lowered it just a little, along with using the 15 inch Verde wheels, and it seemed to make it just that much better, steadier on the road.
 

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For every day (night) driving, the best modification on mine is without question the replacement of the Elma US lamps with Carello units from a European car. Much safer and more comfortable.
 

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For every day (night) driving, the best modification on mine is without question the replacement of the Elma US lamps with Carello units from a European car. Much safer and more comfortable.
Always amazes me when people say this as our UK cars have the Euro lights but even though I've fitted relays and high intensity bulbs they're barely adequate. The ones in my new 1.2 litre Fiat (fear the power!) are far better.

What do the US cars use, candles?
 

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Put extra spacers under front of seat runners, and remove rear ones.
Prevents "Alfa ankle"

Do it to every 75 I've had.
I've twisted, tweaked and bent my accelerator pedal arm for that.
 

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I've done most of the stuff listed here and then some. Hard to pick a specific thing because all of my mods have incrementally made my car tight and precise handling, more power, more consistent... A couple not mentioned here I really appreciate:

--Ball joint caster rods
--Drilled and backcut gears in 4.10 Platinum transaxle with 4 LSD clutch discs
--Poly bushed everywhere with new factory lower front a-arm bushings
--Koni adjustables
--Ditched ABS and converted to hydraulic
--Slotted rotors
--Full Hawk race pads (swap out for street)
--Needle bearing shift linkage mod
--164 alternator swap
--17" wheels - I like the 16" plenty but the brake cooling benefit at the track with 17" is huge!!
--Braided stainless brake lines
--New factory ATE MC, reservoir, ATE Super Blue fluid, and proportioning valve (took forever and brakes are finally DIALED)
--Tons more
 

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I've done most of the above but I'd like details on this.
With regard to the needle bearing shifter. Someone on the BB offered a "kit" (just two bearings and a bolt from memory). Not sure if he still does or is even around. But anyway - I did this on an old GTV6 - drilled out the shifter handle base (the eye), and added in a larger needle bearing that I got from a little catalog (based on dimension). It didn't make much difference compared to a decent stock bushing. It was more expensive and more trouble than the solution I've landed on and continue to use (next para).

What I now do is drill out the eyelet at the shifter and press in a self lubricating (make your own by heating a the bronze in oil) standard bronze bushing and matched bolt, available at any hardware store. You also need to drill the holes of the shifter rod (under car, part that connects handle with rans) to accept new bolt. I think it was 3/8". Way easier, no maintenance, easily replaceable. I haven't worn through any of them yet after years - and it only cost me a few bucks.
 

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It's a toss up between the redundant fuel pumps, the oversized radiator and oil cooler, or the roof mounted rear brake cooling ducts. All of this is on our LeMons Milano, btw.

bs
 

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With regard to the needle bearing shifter. Someone on the BB offered a "kit" (just two bearings and a bolt from memory). Not sure if he still does or is even around. But anyway - I did this on an old GTV6 - drilled out the shifter handle base (the eye), and added in a larger needle bearing that I got from a little catalog (based on dimension). It didn't make much difference compared to a decent stock bushing. It was more expensive and more trouble than the solution I've landed on and continue to use (next para).

What I now do is drill out the eyelet at the shifter and press in a self lubricating (make your own by heating a the bronze in oil) standard bronze bushing and matched bolt, available at any hardware store. You also need to drill the holes of the shifter rod (under car, part that connects handle with rans) to accept new bolt. I think it was 3/8". Way easier, no maintenance, easily replaceable. I haven't worn through any of them yet after years - and it only cost me a few bucks.
Thanks Rob. And does it cure the rattling shifter problem as well?
 

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very interesting thread. I'm getting ready to find out!! ciao, jc
 

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I've done most of the stuff listed here and then some. Hard to pick a specific thing because all of my mods have incrementally made my car tight and precise handling, more power, more consistent... A couple not mentioned here I really appreciate:

--Ball joint caster rods
--Drilled and backcut gears in 4.10 Platinum transaxle with 4 LSD clutch discs
--Poly bushed everywhere with new factory lower front a-arm bushings
--Koni adjustables
--Ditched ABS and converted to hydraulic
--Slotted rotors
--Full Hawk race pads (swap out for street)
--Needle bearing shift linkage mod
--164 alternator swap
--17" wheels - I like the 16" plenty but the brake cooling benefit at the track with 17" is huge!!
--Braided stainless brake lines
--New factory ATE MC, reservoir, ATE Super Blue fluid, and proportioning valve (took forever and brakes are finally DIALED)
--Tons more

Well we've all done a bunch of them. But which ONE? ;)
 

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Thanks Rob. And does it cure the rattling shifter problem as well?
In my experience a lot of the rattling tends to come from looseness at the rear: the bits rattle and it transmits up the shifter shaft. Only fix is to rebuild the isostatic linkage.

In the front of the car (pivot point below the shift rod) I had good results by just rebuilding it properly. There's a bushing in the shift rod bottom eyelet with flutes to hold grease, and there is supposed to be a rubber o-ring in a groove on each side of it. I replaced the o-rings and filled the flutes with high-temperature grease. Then I used a longer bolt to put things back together and double-nutted it to keep things from coming loose.
 
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