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I purchased the Centerline rebuild kit and will begin this weekend. Any advice on were to start and in what order to attempt this that will either make the rebuild easier and or shorten the time it takes? Should I pull apart the tie rods with everything on the car for support or simply drop them at the steering hub and drop the entire front end in two pieces? I have read were I ought to measure the current tie rods to get an approximate setting for my new ones-- this seems reasonable. I know this is a dumb question(s) but what and were do I lubricate? What are the torch specs? A step by step would be wonderful if anyone has one already written up. I did a search and didn't find one.
 

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I just finished installing the rebuild kit on my '86 quad. I removed one side at a time, following procedure in shop manual. I used the all-thread method for removing springs. For me the hardest part was getting the bolt out that goes through the body and holds the upper (camber adjust?) bar in. On the passenger side this bolt is next to impossible to get to. I ended up pulling the intake plenum off to get to it. Some people say you can get it out without removing plenum. Other than that the install was pretty straight forward. I also used standard ball joint/tie-rod end forks to remove the joints. You wil also need access to a press to remove/replace bushings in lower wishbones.
I sent you a PM with my number if you would like to call me.
 

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easyest way..drop it from the steering shaft, and the idler are and the outside( near the wheels) links.this way you can remove the centre link easyer.and yes , just make a really good mesurment when you put it all togeather.... but beware..getting the steering wheel and the wheels straight ahead..well...have fun:):)..oh yes..this is only for the steering links.
 

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bianchi1 wrote: "getting the steering wheel and the wheels straight ahead..well...have fun"

This is what professional alignment shops are for. Just get everything close, and have the pros with the equipment dial it in. Your tires won't last long unless the caster and toe-in are properly set.

One other tip - put anti-sieze on all of the tapered joints, and it will be easier to take apart the next time.
 
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