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This car is literally sitting in a barn about 5 miles from my home. The guy parked it in 1982, drained the gas (he says), and it hasn't run since. It has rust in corners of the widows, paint looks original, body is straight (as far as I could tell) and the interior looks OK, but dusty. He says the car had low oil pressure and thats why he hasn't driven it. He wants $1750. Is it worth making any kind of offer on, and is it worth what he's asking. Any and all input welcome.




 
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If that vehicle were put on ebay, how much do you think it would bring?

In my opinion, it's not worth $1750. I'm guessing it would bring $800 at auction. The important question, as always, is whether or not you are prepared to take on a project. I see a lot of rust, cracked glass, and so on.

On the "for sale" forum, there is a '75 Alfetta GTV selling for $5500 that is in very good condition. I seriously doubt that you could bring this model up to that standard with an outlay of an additional $3750 (not counting your time, of course).

It would be nice to see someone restore this, however.

David
'86 GTV-6
 

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If you want to undertake a restoration, an unmolested car, even if not running, is not bad place to start, since having a complete car is most important. However, at $1750, or at $0, it will be a lot more expensive than for example, the at least two very nice GTV6 examples that have been sold recently (and are mentioned in this BB) for less than $11k. One of those had only 16k mi... I don't know how much an excellent looking Alfetta would go for, but the point is the same... I've said on several ocassions that the most expensive way to own a classic car is buy a non-running example that needs to be made roadworthy again.

Best regards,
 

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i see rust but no cancer(rot)..makeing me wonder what coast you are on....overall looks like a VERY cherry car and a great starting point..1 look at the interior says alot about the car's history and id belive the story the guy gave you

as for price 1000-1200 TOPS i wouldnt pay a penny more unless i hear it running and can run the trans thru the gears...mind you thats asumeing the car is as rust(rot/cancer) free as it looks....a little surface rust is nothing that cant be wired sanded and primed...course thats also asumeing i was desperatly looking for one
 

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OK, I'm one of those guys that's always dragging home junkers. Some day maybe I'll buy a perfectly restored GTV but until then, I really enjoy the process. To me there is nothing better than spending late nights in the garage tooling away on a cool project and the satisfaction of a job well done. Think of it as life sized model car/airplane. If that is what you're looking for, this looks like a great place to start. It’s a cool car, great color and it looks to be mostly complete. Take it apart and have fun. However, this can also be an expensive project. If you're not handy and plan on having most of the work completed by a mechanic, than I would pass. Lastly, I agree with the others, price seems a little steep. I think the $1000 seems like a better deal.
 

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If it was driveable I would pay $700. Otherwise it is a $500 parts car.
An early model doesn't have drive line donuts available anymore.
Low oil pressure????? You know the answer to that. . . .

If you would spend $1,000 or $2,000 you would have a pretty nice $1,500 daily driver.
It is an Alfetta GT. Not an Alfetta Sedan or a GTV.
Buy it, spend too much $$ to get it running, and enjoy it.
We have over $2,000 into our '76, plan another $1,500 to put air cond into it (it has none). Don't regret a single $$$, or any of the hours replacing worn out parts.
 

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if your looking at it as a "flip" or "profit" then go elsewhere...if your looking at it as a solid "fun" project id see how far you can talk the guy down and then jump on it
 

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way too expensive. $500 tops, you are going to spend $3000 min to bring it up to standard. Persoannly I dont believe this guys story. Just look at the UV damadge to all the plastic switches and paint. It takes many years to fade switches like that, even in a hot climate. Do you really believe that this car was only 6 years old when it was left in this barn?, Texas good climate caused all this rust and damage inside a barn? Doubtfull. just to start you will need, New brakes, complete new fuel system/rebuild. All new seals, engine re-build, new tyres, maybe new wheels..........
 

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My two cents is just about the same as most of these replies. Too much money, could be a costly project... Yada yada yada. I say $500 tops like mjr since I can pick up a running Alfetta around here for $1000 or so.
 

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agree with what everyone is saying, especially the fact that it's not running would make $1750 too high....if you really want an Alfetta GT/GTV, you could do better
 

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Barn Find -- 76 GTV -- Is It Worth It?

Take my comments with a grain of salt, considering my circumstances and Alfa experience were and are probably much different than yours, but anyway....

Having never owned a '76 GTV only a sedan, I'd be somewhat intrigued with it, especially since it's not red. As far as having low oil pressure; others are saying no based on having to rebuild the engine or replace the engine. If that's a problem for you, you should probably pass; if you have a spare engine lying around, probably not an issue. The availability of donuts could be an issue, depending on how much money you want to sink into the car, locating a source, having them made, etc. There is always a solution, depending on the amount of money that you're willing to spend and how much staying original means to you, even in parts that are not seen.

I only see surface rust on the parts of the car that I can see; however, you mention that there is rust around the windows, that is usually not a good sign of what might be below. Rust repair around windows, especially, the windshield can be done successfully, but it takes someone who knows what they're doing and you're going to pay for that expertise. It's difficult to see from the picture, but I may also see rust above the left directional signal housing, which also is not a good sign, if water has seeped down into the housing and created unseen problems. Left unattended the surface rust will turn the car into a rust cancer piece eventually and if not repaired will make it impossible for you to sell at much over a parts car price.

The actual interior seats look good to me, but there is something about the interior front floors that bother me in the picture. I can't put my finger on it, just my gut feeling based on the way the wires are hanging which makes me think that there may also be electrical problems, which are one of the hardest things to hunt down and sometimes it's easier to just gut it and rewire so that you don't have the car "shorting out" at inopportune times.

My best guess, if Pat really wanted the car, and he was certainly capable of bringing it back, he would pay between $1 - $1,250 tops. If you're looking for an everyday driver without a lot of work and expense, you might consider totally passing on this one and finding a better one, or if you could get the price down on this one and find a running one with a ratty interior where the two prices would come out about the same, buy it, and transfer the interior. The second option almost requires that you're into Alfas, have a place to store one while searching for the other etc.; the timing of finding two vehicles doesn't always mesh.

Good luck in finding an Alfa that suits your needs, life style, and abilities, both skilled and financial.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The only bubbling rust that I saw besides the surface stuff under the hood was at the corners of the rear window under the moldings (which is depicted in one of the pics). The guy did say that he drove it home to the barn from the PO's place (about 120 mile trip), but didn't do anything to it after that. That makes me wonder about his symptom of low oil pressure. Perhaps he got a red light on the dash, and didn't pursue it further. The guy is savvy mechanically, however, because he had a lot of old VW's lying around and rebuilt a few when he was younger. He's a guy in his late 60's or early 70's now. Anyway, it is probably a loser, money-wise, based on the consensus of opinions. My main inquiry was whether these cars are worth rebuilding at all, no matter whether it is $500.00 or $1750.00.
 

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swap it over to a 2.5 and build it up as a "early" gtv6 and enjoy
I would keep it 4 cyl and retain it light and nimble. For more power and reliability I would rather transplant a 75 TS 4 cyl engine.

Oh, and I'm all for bringing it back to glory, but, of course, I'm not the one having to do all the work and cough up the $$$... although I would like to (do the work), but too many projects and too little space... bla, bla, bla... :rolleyes: :eek:

Jes
 

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My main inquiry was whether these cars are worth rebuilding at all, no matter whether it is $500.00 or $1750.00.
YES, IT IS WORTH REBUILDING! SAVE EVERY ALFETTA THAT YOU CAN! These are fantastic automobiles that are underappreciated by the collector community. This car looks to be very restorable and it needs to be saved. Even if you spend 8-10K on it you will have an exceptionally cool automobile.
Rebuild the engine, throw $2500 at the body, and reassemble.
 
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