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1984 GTV6, 1973 Berlina, 1987 Milano
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Discussion Starter #1
My GTV6 windows are slow like most. I just measured how quickly they roll down, over 12 seconds for the driver side but only 3 for the passenger side.

I have a spare set of Milano regulators sitting around, are they similar?

I'm not trying to swap them, just wondering if rebuilding a Milano regulator for practice is worth the effort.

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The drive motors are the same, the rest of the system is totally different between GTV6 and Milano/75. To speed up the window lift apply silicon spray lubricant to the window bailey channels and try cleaning all the connections along the loom from the switches to the motors and if you are up to it dismantle the switches and clean the contact points. As the whole electric window system gets older physical resistence rises (tight bailey channels) as does the electrical resistence through the loom so the contact points on the switches get dirty with carbon deposits from arching.
 

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1984 GTV6, 1973 Berlina, 1987 Milano
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1,566 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, good to know. I am already planning to clean up as many connections as I can. I assume it's mostly a grease issue since one side is so much faster but I have a couple oil leaks that are a higher priority to fix first.

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The doors on the Alfetta GT and GTV6 are the worst part of the car (IMHO) the result of a 1970s cost reduction I suspect. On my 1975 Alfetta GT there is a single cable that attaches to the bottom of the door glass. On the milano/75 the door glass is still connected at a single point, but the wire is inside a tube that stops any side-to-side movement. My windows had a load of grease in the channels when I got the car, and the windows were locked solid. I cleaned that muck out and they sort of move, but with dificulty. The windows are manual, so you can feel how much stress is going into the cable. Later in the production the manual winders came with a planet-gear to help make the torque at the handle a bit easier. I think the main issue is that the channels are different lengths on the glass, so the glass itself excerts a twisting torque when you pull on the cable, and jams itself. The cable needs to be restrained somehow, or maybe use two cables or retrofit the milano tube guide system. My 1967 Ford had an X-scissor affair with a spring and two runners on the bottom of the glass, and you could wind those windows up or down very fast with little effort.
 
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