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I understand these are a bit bigger than reccomended . How bad is this apart from possible wheel well rubbing and speedo error? I got great deal on them and took a leap of faith.
Thanks to anyone who can reply fast, I'm in Montreal Canada and they are forecasting 6 inches fo tommorrow!
 

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You might be better off with the 195/65-15 size, mainly because narrower tires are thought to work better by having a higher pressure into the snow/ice because of the smaller tire patch. Wider tires tend to float more, and not have as much traction. However, these should work well enough. Hope you got four, not two.
 

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Del,
How did you make out in the snow today? I got my snow tires on mid morning, just before most of it hit. I'm thinking about getting some chains. They sure don't look after the roads very well here in Bellingham The city sold off all the snow removal equipment several years ago. What they have acquired to replace it looks like it would work in parking lots.
 

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Started about 1 pm, I guess, and snowed heavy for several hours, but it really didn't stick here in the south end of Seattle. Later it started to rain and all is gone. The roads were always clear here, but I guess it was a little messy further north of Seattle.

Last year I bought some brand new model Goodyear snow tires from Discount, and used them a couple of days. They worked very well on the 164 in all the wet "slick as snot" packed slush we call snow here.

I wouldn't think you should really need chains (actually, cables) with the 164, but it doesn't hurt to have a set with you.
 

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Narrower snow tires may work slightly better in heavy or wet snow. In the colder and drier snow we get East of the Rockies tire width makes no practical difference. Montreal gets wet or dry snow depending on the temperature (which can be brutally cold as well as wet!)

I detect no difference in winter tire performance on snow or ice whether I use 185, 195, 205 or even 225 section tires. Modern snow tires are just so good it hardly matters.

On bare road it is very noticable how poorly the narrower tires handle compared to the low profile wider tires. So, unless you fight deep heavy wet snow frequently I recommend using the same sized tire for snows as for summers, up to 225/45 x 17.

I would not recommend going lower than 45 series as then you get rim damage and sidewall pinching issues in deep snow or icy ruts.

One minor advantage that taller tires have is the softer sidewall that goes with taller tires does give slightly better traction for braking and acceleration. The key to winter traction is that transition zone between grip and no grip right at the contact patch. Taller tires are easier to drive in winter but this is not related to tread width but to sidewall height and the ability to feel the traction at the contact patch. Taller is better, narrower isn't necessarily better. Taller means the peak traction or braking force is delivered to the contact patch more "softly" so it is easier to keep traction under marginal conditions. The same is true on dry road of course. Everyone knows taller tires have more progressive breakaway, better "feel" than low profile tires. This becomes more important in winter.
 

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The trouble here in Seattle is that when it snows the temp is always at or above freezing so what we get is deep wet slush with rain on top which when compacted by a tire turns on to wet sloppy ice, the slipperiest substance known to man I think. Wider tires seem to float on this stuff, not offering much traction. Actually, narrow tires don't work all that well in this stuff either, lol. You need a tread design, among other factors, which will squoosh the slush out from under the tread without lifting the tire too much, such as the new Goodyear Ultragrip GW-3 snow/ice tires with the GS-D3 F1 style directional tread.

I've driven on cold snow in the mountains and in Alaska, and that is a piece of cake. Like driving on sandy ground. I'd take that any day compared to what we get. I have friends who have come out from the East or Midwest who say, ah, you guys just don't know how to drive in snow. Guess who are the first to get stuck.

Anyway, as Michael mentions, as long as you don't get crazy with low profile tires, you should be ok. Just consider the type/temp of snow/slush/ice you will mostly encounter when you consider tread design. Modern snow tires work well enough to forget about using studs, which just tear up the roadway anyway.
 

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The very best wet snow tires I have used are Nokian.

The latest model is the RSi. Very stable on bare roads and with the correct directional tread to eject heavy snow from under the contact patch.

I also got very good traction in slush from Toyo Observ but couldn't stand the hard ride and high noise levels.

Pirelli 210 ( h rated) and winter carving (T rated) also get high marks from me for slush.

Nokian is the best though. I have the Hakka Q on two cars and WR on another.

The 164 runs on Pirelli Snow Sport 210 which I don't recommend for the wet stuff. The newest Sottozeros are pretty good in all winter conditions but best on bare road.

I have also driven the newest Dunlop 3D winters and they are excellent.
 

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Our Norwegian exchange student's father also swears by Nokian for their winters. For us, however, they are difficult to find, and are darn expensive. Having said that, though, if they had been available around here, I probably would have sprung for a set. I do see that more people on Ebay are offering them now with free shipping. Oh well. Maybe next time.

The autosock looks interesting but appears to be far too smooth for slush, would never grip something as sloppy and loose as slush. Might work well on ice though.
 

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I agree Nokia is one of the best. A lot of people run them here. Another good winter tyre that are run a lot in northern Europe is Gislaved. Maybe you can find them on ebay. When magazines test winter tyres here its alwas a close run between Gislaved and Nokia then comes the rest.
 

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I concur. I used a set of the old Gislaved Y tread pattern tires for many years on my old SAAB 9000. Really good winter tires with good bare road grip as well as snow and ice grip. Later versions have kept up with the best.
 

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Nokians

Nokian Hakkapillitta 195 65 15. Ran them on my former 164S thru three winters, and they were terrific. I had all fours studded, and the car was practically unstoppable in all kinds of snow. and decent on the ice. You are going to sacrafice a lot of dry pavement handling though, especially with studs.
 

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what wheels did you use with the Nokians? In the image they look like steel wheels? I am looking for a set of spare wheel to mount snows tires on. Any suggestions.
Frank
 

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ive ALWAYS found a tall side wall with LOWERED air presure to be best...you just cant drive at freeway speeds on low air presure but you will generaly get maximum grip as it widens the foot print and allows the tire to mold to the surface for maximum grip
 

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I'll chime in for another vote on Nokian's. I just put new Toyo snow's on today and they aren't any better than the bald Nokians I just threw away. An expensive experiment but I think next year I'll go back to the Finnish tires. And as for size, my summers are 225/40-17 and the winters are 205/55-16.

As an aside, I also have Nokian NRZi summer tires which are fantastic. The main reason for that is that they have a lower temp compound than most summer tires and are supposed to work well down to the freezing point. I'm sure Michael will concur that low temps in Alberta are not uncommon even in the summer (we've had snow storms in July and September, have yet to see one in August though :eek:). They also have two interesting features: numbers indicating tread depth on the tread (the highest number visible indicates the amount in mm of tread left) and they have a little green "button" the turns black at 0C or 32F (take your pick!).

Frank
(somewhere in Northern Alberta...)
 

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I love my Nokian's but am on probably my last season with them. I have the (now discontinued) Hakka NRW. This was a "performance" or all season winter tire (probably now comparable to the WR.) It has been descent in terms of dry road performance, and the ability to travel comfortably at highway speeds. I was considering replacing with the Hakka RSi. Does anyone have experience with this tire? Also considering going back to an all out snow tire, but I can't determine any "real world driving" difference between the Hakka 2, 4 and 5 based on the web site descriptions...

And Multicam (Frank), I picked up a set of used L alloy wheels for winter use. Lighter than steel, and minimal openings on the face keep them from clogging with packed snow. (Where in CT are you???)
 
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