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My low speed isn't coming on. I've got a new switch. I just need time to put it in along with the motor operated ball valve I got.
 

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Tell me anyway these low speed cooling fan stuff check results

My low speed isn't coming on. I've got a new switch. I just need time to put it in along with the motor operated ball valve I got.
With key Tell me your low speed relay clicks if you jump black to brown wire in Low Speed wire connector at radiator thermal switch and also if you jumper same color wires at a/c receiver trinary switch.

You do have continuity between larger brown and blue wires going to low speed fan resistor in radiator shroud, too right?
 

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When I had my "fan not running" problem it turned out to be the power connector right at the fan. It had overheated and partially melted the plug. I suspect the reason was due to bad bearing, I could hear them grinding when I spun the fan by hand. Bearing is fairly easy to replace if you have that problem. I couldn't find a new connector so I just hard wired right to the fan and clamped new wires to support then used a generic male and female connector for a disconnect point at the base.

When troubleshooting you can bypass all of the switches and verify that fan does run when given power.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Have you gone through Steve's trouble shooting guide?
When I had my "fan not running" problem it turned out to be the power connector right at the fan. It had overheated and partially melted the plug. I suspect the reason was due to bad bearing, I could hear them grinding when I spun the fan by hand. Bearing is fairly easy to replace if you have that problem. I couldn't find a new connector so I just hard wired right to the fan and clamped new wires to support then used a generic male and female connector for a disconnect point at the base.

When troubleshooting you can bypass all of the switches and verify that fan does run when given power.

Thank you for this. The fan does have some resistance when spinning so the bearing could be suspect. I'll take a look at that power connector too.
 

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Hi Andy. I live in Dallas and had one installed on my LS about 3 or 4 years ago. This was after going through the checklist to make sure all of the fuses and electrical connections were working on the cooling system. I would be in a constant state of anxiety when driving in the Dallas summer as the temp gauge would get close to 200 degrees.

With the new system, I have it set so that the car rarely gets above 185 degrees. I can now drive it in stop and go traffic in Dallas when it is 100+ degrees outside without worrying. The adjustable mechanism seems to last about 2+ years and then it needs to be replaced.

My mechanic installed it and says that he uses them on the race cars he works on and is familiar with them. Now the downside is that my radiator fan is working about 25% more of the time. Thus, I always listen for any bearing sounds coming from the radiator fan as it is getting more use than under the stock setup. However, for Dallas traffic, it has been a success.

Good luck with your decision.

Cheers.
 

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"constant state of anxiety when driving in the Dallas summer as the temp gauge would get close to 200 degrees"

Actually, it is pretty normal for the gauge to hover around 185-210F in the 164. My DD 91S has done that since I bought it in 94, and the 94LS is pretty much the same, even in the summertime Southwest. Max limit for the pressurized coolant in these systems is ~260F.

However, I understand your squeamish feeling, we being more used to colder engines from the old days. My experience with the 164 is that if all is working correctly and in good condition, all will be well, as compared to say the Milano which, except for the Verde, had an undersized radiator. That standard radiator is NOA, replaced by the Verde unit. Our Milano ran very hot (red light and all) in Arizona on our way to Texas, having to pull the front license plate to get a little more cooling, besides running the heater, lol. It was awful!!
 

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It was not hard at all. I believe the kit comes with instructions for the wiring. There is a flexible wire with a temperature probe at the end and he strung it near the top of the radiator and inserted the probe into the radiator fins near the top row and on the driver's side, away from the water input. He had to drill two small holes on the brace that is above the radiator, on the passenger side, to mount the small 2" by 3" adjustable mechanism.

That was about it. You can still set it to replicate the factory temperature settings if that is what you desire.

When my car would get close to 200 degrees, I was always worrying if the fan was going to come on and cool it down. Anything over 200 degrees and my car started to jettison radiator fluid through the overflow pipe. I was constantly positioning myself for a place to pull over in case something happened. It got to where I dreaded driving the car because of the fear of overheating. And where is the fun of owning an Alfa Romeo if you are afraid of driving it?

Thus, this modification took care of all of that anxiety. Now, maybe if Alfa had designed the temperature gauge with 200 degrees in the middle and the red line at 240 degrees, well off to the side, maybe my stress level would not have been as high.

This is probably more explanation that what you needed. And sometimes I think about that old expression: does the man fix the car or the car fix the man? Let's meet up in Nashville to discuss this further.

Cheers everyone. Jeff

Thanks for sharing Jeff, do you know how hard it was for your mechanic to install?
 

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You might check that the pressure cap on the overflow tank is doing it's job. If the system is not pressurized when hot to about at least 10 psi, if not the usual 15 psi, over ambient, then, yes, you will have coolant piss overboard, esp if the tank was full when you started out. The cap must do it's job for best results.
 

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Thanks Del for the advise. I have not had the cap pressure checked, but have gone through several expansion tanks. Lately, when the car starts to run hot, the system is not holding pressure and I see small amounts of fluid seepage at the expansion tank joints. Thus, time for a new tank. Hopefully we are not at the point where those are no longer available.
 

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I recall some recent discussions about the replacement tanks being sold not being as robust as the originals. Despite the confined space I think it would be possible to fit an aftermarket tank from Jeggs or Summit if it came the point of them just being completely NLA.
 

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Once in a while a used original tank will show up on eBay or the BB. I've scarfed up a couple of them since I have two 164s. Same for the Milano.

When the pressure in the system is not held, the boiling temperature of the coolant will drop down maybe ~30F? I'm sure that having a leaky tank or hose will cause the pressure to drop as well as the loss of coolant.

Had to spend some time to trace coolant drips on the garage floor from the Milano. Turned out to be a crack in the bottom nipple of the tank, the coolant running behind the hose, unseen until I pulled the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I recall some recent discussions about the replacement tanks being sold not being as robust as the originals. Despite the confined space I think it would be possible to fit an aftermarket tank from Jeggs or Summit if it came the point of them just being completely NLA.
Anecdotally, I have an a replacement tank and it isn't very great.
 

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If they are used as intended...driving daily, or at least regularly, you'll probably never need a tank. These cars are great if they are used and maintained:)
 

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I kinda think the other way, as since these are fatigue cracks (plastic being very poor in fatigue resistance), the more times the engine is started and run, the more pressure and heat cycles you get.

However, I definitely agree with the statement about the cars being great if used, kept clean, and maintained, not let go.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Another question, my fan bearings don't sound great and my fan doesn't spin very freely when I spin it by hand. Has anyone installed one of those aftermarket electric fans that Vicks sells? Any electric fan would technically work, but I'm wondering if the 12" would do or should I step up to the 14". @alfissimoInt. I would prefer to buy a fan from you but they're a little out of my price range, so an aftermarket electric one will be the route that I go.

I need to decide on what to install and what not to. If I wire up an electric fan to a manual switch, then I really don't need the adjustable thermoswitch, but if I wire it up normally, I would probably install the thermoswitch to be on the safe side.

I'll probably just get the 14 inch fan because it looks like the radiator is around 15 inches, wire the fan switch up manually and maybe return the thermoswitch.
 

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It would be a lot less expensive to rebuild the stock motor. Steve, et al, say you can rebuild the fan motor pretty easily. As you surmise, I think it is just the bearing(s) running dry. I haven't done it yet myself, but have a spare one to fiddle with.

The fan in the car now is quite good enough if it runs freely. In fact, if the entire system is in good condition, it is sufficient to properly handle any weather, IMO. No mods are really necessary.
 
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