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I might suggest that if you have problems with the fan coming on in your 164, you should try to find what is wrong with that stock system first. When the stock system is in proper working order, there should be no problem with the coolant temperature being in the permissible range of ~180-220F under all conditions. This is assuming you are using something like premix 50/50 coolant, and have a proper working pressure cap on the overflow tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yup, I'm going to fully solve the issue before I install it. I haven't had time to go over everything, but the water pump was changed with the timing belt roughly 5,000 miles ago, so I don't think it's the thermostat. It has a new radiator, fuse link, and the fan speed relays click when I jumper them, so I think this weekend I'll check the fan resistor.
 

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Yeah, might be that or the fan motor needing fixing. The resister runs so hot that the contacts really suffer, and need attention now and then to make sure they are making good contact. Had this problem with my 91S, the fan not coming on because of heat distorted resister contacts.
 

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Keep in mind that the fan switch is nowhere close to the coolant temperature sensor, so an exact correlation between the indicated temp and the fan activating is probably not possible . . . especially since the stock temp gauge is not accurate in the first place.
 

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I installed one of those adjustable switches years ago. It didn't work well and didn't solve the over heat problem so I took it out and replaced the original switch.
 

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The switch that seems to go bad is the one in the side of the radiator that turns the fan on high or low speed.
 

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I see this attitude not just with Alfas but also on the Land Rover forums. People are convinced that the fan should turn on sooner or that it's a good idea to have a manual override. When actually, if there is an overheating problem, it's often not due to the fan and by altering its operation and duty cycle other problems are introduced by overheating the wiring and connections to the fan itself.

My experience with my two 164's has been that if all is working as it should there is no need to modify the stock setup. The only time I've experienced an overheat problem it was due to the electrical connection to the fan so an override circuit wouldn't have done me any good. I was also able to drive the car fifty miles home with no problem so long as I did not get stuck in traffic and kept moving.
 

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Exactly. Wise words.
 

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My reasoning and I am sticking to it!

You haven't lived and worked in a hot humid climate then have you?

I agree under normal conditions stock 164 cooling fan system can carry the load.

I first added manual overide switch to energize high speed fan relay in 1996 while working in JAX, FL.

I needed it to get a/c cooling in sweltering 4 pm heat after car even with car cover on it and windows open some sat in hot parking lot all day. I could not get cooled down in the 8 mile stop and go traffic trip home until I added manual switch.
 

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The previous owner of Red was convinced it was running too hot and his solution was to install a big honkin' aluminum radiator. He also wired up the fan to keep running after the engine is turned off - something I don't particularly care for. The rad however is a pretty nice piece of kit and does the job well.
 

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I installed one of those adjustable switches years ago. It didn't work well and didn't solve the over heat problem so I took it out and replaced the original switch.
Yup. Never solves the problem. Best thing to do is what Del has suggested. Repair the problems in the system. I have advocated for everyone to go back to running a stock setup. It works well when working properly! I have all the parts needed to repair the cooling fan system including resistor, fan switch, fan motors etc...
 

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"I needed it to get a/c cooling in sweltering 4 pm heat after car even with car cover on it and windows open some sat in hot parking lot all day. "

Now it really helps to install one of those electric ball valves for the coolant line to the heater core.
 

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"I needed it to get a/c cooling in sweltering 4 pm heat after car even with car cover on it and windows open some sat in hot parking lot all day. "

Now it really helps to install one of those electric ball valves for the coolant line to the heater core.
Been there done that, too, but with the manual PEX valve. I only need to do the open/close trick twice a year. I may move on up to the electric heater valve heater core shutoff valve once I am caught up on my other maintenance backlog items with higher priority.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yup. Never solves the problem. Best thing to do is what Del has suggested. Repair the problems in the system. I have advocated for everyone to go back to running a stock setup. It works well when working properly! I have all the parts needed to repair the cooling fan system including resistor, fan switch, fan motors etc...
Looking at parts now Jason. I need to do some more testing/checking things out before I pull the trigger, but my fan feels a little stiff when spinning it by hand and doesn't really seem to come on at all when the car heats up.
 

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If the fan isn't coming on at all, the 1st thing to check is the 40amp bar fuse on the false fire wall behind the coolant bottle. They can get a fine crack barely noticeable
 
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