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No experience with the Alfaholics setup specifically, but I do run a Tilton dual master setup. These do not use a booster (and indeed cannot). They will work with stock, but I found the boosterless setup felt much nicer with the 6 pot setup from Alfaholics.

The real advantage of this setup is being able to fine tune bias along with redundancy in the brake setup given that you have two completely independent brake systems front and rear.
 

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I've installed the LHD version. Pretty straightforward. I'll dig out some pictures and post. AH has a cable that provides brake bias adjustment which I think is necessary with standing pedals. For some reason it's not listed on their website but if you ask...
 

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.

I have installed one on my car (73 GTV. tipo 105.22. RHD)

It is excellent!

I have been using un-servoed brakes for many years & when my original MC failed, the Alfaholics setup seemed like a logical replacement...

I run Wilwood 4 pot calipers on the front (4 x 1.38" piston) with 11" x .81" Discs, and standard calipers on the rear.


Bear in mind - it is not a '5 minute' install. You will need some new brake lines, and a brake flare tool to make them. (you will be removing your servo)

I recommend 'speed bleeders' for your calipers, - in order to bleed the brakes you ideally need to do all 4 calipers at once.

I also had to grind a small amount of material from the clevis as it limited brake pedal travel. (but that was a minor issue)

As for the adjustable brake bias, I set it once & haven't touched it since....


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Setting balance just requires a track or low-traffic road. A rolling road isn’t necessary or helpful.

You do a series of hard stops- right up to where the tires start to lock up. Start with the bias moderately forward and then dial in bias towards the rear on progressive hard stops until the rear starts to get loose under braking, then dial back a bit more forward bias for a final setting.

Ok a track car, you may want a remote bias adjuster so you can adjust for specific tracks and conditions. A tighter track with lower speeds may demand more rear bias, and vise versa.
 

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You do a series of hard stops- right up to where the tires start to lock up. Start with the bias moderately forward and then dial in bias towards the rear on progressive hard stops until the rear starts to get loose under braking, then dial back a bit more forward bias for a final setting....
That is exactly how I did it...
 
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