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Sorta off topic, but I'm considering a move to Zurich and wondering if anyone has experience bringing a classic to Switzerland. From what I understand, the authorities are quite restrictive on imports of most cars that were not originally sold in the EU. Of course the GTV was sold in the EU, but the USA version is quite different. I also know that are very scrupulous about the condition of the car. If you know anything, lemme know!
 

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i lived there for a bit (altstatten actually)

if it's a permanent move..it'll be harder. they're very strict about modifications. but if it's temporary (1 yr or less was the rule i think), you can drive it there on US plates for a while.

double check though..that was as of a few yrs ago. same thing with your drivers license, that's good for 1 year also i think.
 

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Thanks... I read about that. I dunno if its permanent, but if i'm going its gonna be more than a year. I'm restoring my car to stock condition (except invisible things like pistons and cams) Any ballpark concept on how much it would cost in transportation (i'm on the east coast)?

BTW I went to a classic car meetup in Zug and found these guys: Alfa Oldtimer Alfa Romeo Rickenbach ZH Winterthur Stalder Moser Alfa Reparaturen Alfa Ersatzteil Alfa Romeo Spider Alfa Romeo Bertone Alfa Romeo GTV Alfa Romeo occasion Alfa Romeo Service Mietauto Alfa Romeo mieten oldtimer mietenAlfa Oldtimer Alfa R

some nice cars for sale and actually pretty reasonable given the standard they work to (i saw a few of their cars at the show)
Alfa Oldtimer Alfa Romeo Rickenbach ZH Winterthur Stalder Moser Alfa Reparaturen Alfa Ersatzteil Alfa Romeo Spider Alfa Romeo Bertone Alfa Romeo GTV Alfa Romeo occasion Alfa Romeo Service Mietauto Alfa Romeo mieten oldtimer mietenAlfa Oldtimer Alfa R

but don't even look at the parts for sale section... insanely expensive.

i lived there for a bit (altstatten actually)

if it's a permanent move..it'll be harder. they're very strict about modifications. but if it's temporary (1 yr or less was the rule i think), you can drive it there on US plates for a while.

double check though..that was as of a few yrs ago. same thing with your drivers license, that's good for 1 year also i think.
 

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you're probably ok with internals. but they're really stringent on things like rust, brake condition, exhaust condtion (and sound level) etc. they have an inspection system called the TUV

It'll be a few thousand to transport it (3k or so). best way would be to pick it up yourself in breman...a seaport somewhere.

one thing to check would be if GTV's were sold in switzerland, how were they different. if they had different lights or something, they may require you to modify yours accordingly. i looked at bringing my camaro over there, but it was too much of a PITA.

Vehicle Roadworthiness in Geneva, Switzerland - AngloINFO Geneva, in the Geneva region (Switzerland)
 

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I brought my gtv over while it was still in pieces, when I moved to Germany from Montreal in '96. The import process as such wasn't complicated, although it was the moving company that presented the paperwork to the customs. I only had to give the right papers (the usual ownership stuff) to the movers.
As far as licensing it in Germany, it wasn't bad. Yes, the TUeV will be much more strict about stuff than you might expect. Assuming CH is like D, some specifics:
- they won't care about emissions as you should be registering it directly as a Historic vehicle ("Oldtimer" is commonly said in german.) Do make it clear that you want this historic registration, just in case. In D, historics pay much lower vehicle yearly taxes and lower insurance. You should also get an insurance specific to historic cars. Unfortunately in europe these typically limit you to 5000 km / year, which can be awful tight if you want to use the car regularly and/or for longer trips.
- wheels / tyres MUST be OEM. i.e. you must use an original wheel sold by Alfa for that car, unless you can provide the right paperwork to certify a particular wheel for use on that particular vehicle. Tyre sizes are strict, you will need either 165hr14 or 185/70r14 to pass the TUeV. (185/70R14 was an accepted alternate size as far as the TUeV was concerned.)
- You'll need to convert the headlights to euro ones. You'll need H4 euro bowls, lamps, and bulbs, and to convert the connectors to the larger spade size used on H4s.
- If you have the 70s style side lights and reflectors, you'll need to remove the sidelight bulbs. They didn't accept sidelights to be lighted, but they're just fine as reflectors. I rewired the front sidelights to the turn signals to mimic a more normal euro approach.
- they wanted me to add km speed markings on the speedometer face. I made stickers for 30 / 50 / 70 / 100 / 120 km/h and added them in the right place.
- the front USA version below-bumper combination parking lights and turn signals in orange are not legal as parking lights must be white. What I did was to take a page from newer bmw's and installed euro-style parking lights into the H1 driving light reflector bodies. Basically I got some older vw golf headlights from a junkyard that included these kind of parking lights, then copied the setup into the H1 reflectors. They insert into the reflector into a key-shaped opening (which I drilled and filed to shape) a couple inches off the center lamp axis. These were then wired up to the parking light circuit. The below bumper orange lights are now only turn signals.
- I was already using euro style rear light covers, so I'm not sure if they would have insisted on yellow turn signals at the rear or if red are also acceptable.

If your car is nicely restored, well presented also underneath, the guys doing the inspection will appreciate that and it'll help the proceedings. They will be scrutinizing the car for rust, chassis cracks, slop in the front suspension bushings, standard looking suspension and brakes (no fancy alfaholics bits...)

That's what I can think of for the moment. Again, I assume the swiss will be similar to the germans.

A lot of this stuff could be confirmed with a visit to the TUeV station that would be doing the inspection and talking with the guys about the rules for USA version cars.

HTH
Neil
 
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