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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, BB'ers any idea what is it? Friend of mine spotted it, he siad it had alfa romeo lettering, but couldn't take a closer look, because of wandering rotviler :D Rear looks very gt/gtv'ish but those lights are confusing.
Thanks,
Pete

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for quick reply. Yes after taking a look on the pictures from the link - no doubt it's an ISO revolta. But ****, the design, interior, dash, steering whell... put an alfa embelm and voila! :D
 

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It's amazing to me how Guigiaro's burst of designs in the early 60's played out. The iso is gorgeous, the 2600 is classy and unprecedented (except maybe by touring cars), his early BMW coupe spawned the both the 2002 and the 3.0CS, the alfa GTV was copied (yes it was!) by pininfarina for the Ferrari 330GTC, and while I'm at it his Testudo show car of 1963 (?) was copied again for the Daytona. The iso is definitely a sleeper in this set.
 

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Throw the dog a bone and paddy wack on the guys door and see if he will sell it to you. That is a nice saloon to drive. American running gear in an Italian body. The ISO club is very supportive from what I have heard to keep these cars alive.
 

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My father's been heavily involved with all things ISO for the past 30 years or so, and I can confirm that the Rivolta is a lovely car - both to drive and to look at. Slightly quirky styling at the front (but it grows on you), a very well-made chassis and interior, bulletproof (and highly tuneable) engine and drivetrain. Given that prices for a good Grifo are now beginning to climb to around $150-180K, I'd say that the Rivolta is a much-undervalued car - you can pick up a solid driver for around $20K or less. Get one while you still can!

Pieter, if your friend returns to the car, I'd appreciate knowing the location and chassis number (plus any other details like engine and gearbox spec, etc) for the ISO club's register. Thanks!

Alex.
 

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Look how similar the back and rear glass are to Bertone's Mazda 1500/1800.This design was supposedly originally intended for Alfa but they went with the Berlina instead.A mistake imo.
 

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MazAlfa?

I had one of those little Mazdas in my early years.
Threw a Webber on it and Abra-SlamaBama I could taste Pasta!
It was a great little non-Alfa car!
 

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The iso is gorgeous, the 2600 is classy and unprecedented (except maybe by touring cars), his early BMW coupe spawned the both the 2002 and the 3.0CS, the alfa GTV was copied (yes it was!) by pininfarina for the Ferrari 330GTC, and while I'm at it his Testudo show car of 1963 (?) was copied again for the Daytona. The iso is definitely a sleeper in this set.
While we're on the subject of Giugiaro: legend has it Gandini took over and finished Giugiaro's (very early?) initial Miura-sketches. And don't forget the Canguro, which in my opinion evolved into both the Miura and the Montreal.
 

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Kangaroo?

Whats a Canguro?
Where can one obtain pics of the entire Alfa lineage?
I'd like to know more now than just the basics.
Happy motoring.
 

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Whats a Canguro?
Where can one obtain pics of the entire Alfa lineage?
I'd like to know more now than just the basics.
Happy motoring.
It's almost funny that an aussie asks what a Canguro is. May I suggest you google for it, which will lead you automatically to several sites that show and describe most (if not all) cars Alfa ever made.

Once you figure out what Canguro means, you'll probably be smiling too (because in your case, the answer literally is closer than you might think). :)
 

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sorry I dont mean any disrepect. I just think its funny. Also, I saw a recent interview with Guigiaro where he was ready to show the journalist advanced drawings of the Miura in his cabinet
 

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Without any further comment, here's a picture of an Alfa Romeo Canguro during the 2005 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. According to legend, only one specimen was ever built by Bertone. It's basically a road version of the TZ, but Alfa decided against mass-producing it.

Photos: Wouter Melissen
 

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Time to shoot a sacred cow. Is there anyone else in here who finds the styling of the Canguro quite amateurish? It seems too much like 'work in progress' to me, and I guess its significance lies in the fact that it's a one-off and some of the stylistic thoughts contained in the design later found their way into other projects. But as a stand-alone style icon? I think not. It might have wowed people back in the day, but it's nothing with the longevity of the Miura, for example. In fact, in the photos it looks so poor that it could almost be some obscure English glass fibre kit car (check out that grille just slapped on the mouth, awkward headlights, the mish-mash of curves). There's a very good reason why that ended up discarded on the scrap heap, IMHO.

Yep, I know that I'm going to get flamed to heck by some, but there's no point in according reverence to something just because it's an Alfa ...

Alex.
 

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Time to shoot a sacred cow. Is there anyone else in here who finds the styling of the Canguro quite amateurish? It seems too much like 'work in progress' to me, and I guess its significance lies in the fact that it's a one-off and some of the stylistic thoughts contained in the design later found their way into other projects.
The Canguro is no 'sacred cow'. In my opinion, it is a somewhat obscure Alfa exactly for the reasons you mention. Giugiaro was only 25-26 years old when he designed the Giulia Sprint, the Canguro and the Iso Rivolta, and neither of these designs were even close to the lines and 'feel' of his later designs (Alfasud, BMW M1, De Lorean etc.).

With that in mind, the Canguro is indeed the design of an up-and-coming designer yet to achieve his potential and creating his own style.

The reason I brought up the Canguro in the first place was to emphasize the expression Giugiaro had in the early sixties (since this thread is about the Iso Rivolta), not to trump this particular design exercise as the be all, end all of sixties car design. It simply wasn't.

As fas as cool, early sixties car bodies is concerned, the Canguro is an also-ran. Take a look at a Lamborghini 350 GT or the Abarth 204 for an example of a really successful one.

That's your sacred cow ;)
 
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