Alfa Romeo Forums banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
Point well taken (about carb cleaner), but I think you are confusing hoses, we are talking about the large intake hose, nla, and not available in any (to my knowledge) silicon offshoot. DiFatta had the replica for a while (S model, what scatlin has) but I think they sold out. The 6 hoses you are alluding to are pretty long lasting and not leakers.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Point well taken (about carb cleaner), but I think you are confusing hoses, we are talking about the large intake hose, nla, and not available in any (to my knowledge) silicon offshoot. DiFatta had the replica for a while (S model, what scatlin has) but I think they sold out. The 6 hoses you are alluding to are pretty long lasting and not leakers.
No- not confusing hoses, I said replace vacuum hose where silicon hoses apply.
Of course the main hose is OEM or replica.
Those smaller hoses if vacuum should be replaced at the same time. NOTHING lasts forever nor a long time. All vacuum hoses leak. It’s just a matter of tolerable level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,646 Posts
I’ve used carb or brake cleaner for a very long time to find vacuum leaks. A light spritz , not a soaking steady stream. Anywho I still wash my hands with gasoline so I guess I’m a little old school . That’s said dont flame me!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I’ve used carb or brake cleaner for a very long time to find vacuum leaks. A light spritz , not a soaking steady stream. Anywho I still wash my hands with gasoline so I guess I’m a little old school . That’s said dont flame me!!!
Keep doing that and sooner or later you will flame yourself. I’ve been working on cars for 40+ years professionally. I never allowed my technicians to use flammable spray to check for vacuum leaks. Nor were they to wash their hands with gasoline. There are health and safety laws in my state and the insurance premiums are not cheap.
I witnessed a Porsche catch fire when a mechanic was checking for vacuum leaks.
The owner of the car and his lawyers were not happy- neither was the shop owner and the mechanic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
So is that propane torch method OK? What would you recommend?

7/23 Update: I did pull the large intake boot from the car to visually inspect it and found no cracks. It's still pretty flexible so I'm optimistic that there isn't an air leak but I'll check again with propane (or whatever P-3 recommends) once the car is running again.

I also pulled the spark plugs again to check the part number and condition. I am running the NGK Iridiums as suggested, part number BPR6EIX; photo attached if you guys want to take a look and comment. Note that the spark plug in the number 2 cylinder had zero gap but I think that's a red herring since I dropped it on the garage floor trying to get it out of the rear bank and probably bent the electrode. Bonehead moment #1. I was able to open the gap again and I'll go pick up a cheap gap tool next time I'm at O'Reillys but it may be worth just replacing all six plugs just to be sure. What do you guys think about the condition of the plugs in the photos?

In the meantime I decided to drain the coolant since I hadn't done it since I've owned the car. It's one of those "while you're in there" decisions since some of the coolant drained while I replaced the coolant temp sensor. While draining it I noticed that the coolant tank was a little funky looking so I decided to pull it so could flush it out and clean it up a bit. Of course when disconnecting the coolant hose from the bottom of the tank it broke the hard plastic fitting that takes coolant to the heater core. Bonehead moment #2 and $40 to Alfissimo for a new "Reservoir to Water Rail Hose" P/N 60571390

Last, the mail arrived and with it came a new fuel pressure gauge kit. It has too many adapters that I'll probably never use but it was $35 on Amazon so I'm not mad. Once I have the car back together, filled with coolant and can start it up, I'll run the fuel pressure tests.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
So is that propane torch method OK? What would you recommend?

7/23 Update: I did pull the large intake boot from the car to visually inspect it and found no cracks. It's still pretty flexible so I'm optimistic that there isn't an air leak but I'll check again with propane (or whatever P-3 recommends) once the car is running again.

I also pulled the spark plugs again to check the part number and condition. I am running the NGK Iridiums as suggested, part number BPR6EIX; photo attached if you guys want to take a look and comment. Note that the spark plug in the number 2 cylinder had zero gap but I think that's a red herring since I dropped it on the garage floor trying to get it out of the rear bank and probably bent the electrode. Bonehead moment #1. I was able to open the gap again and I'll go pick up a cheap gap tool next time I'm at O'Reillys but it may be worth just replacing all six plugs just to be sure. What do you guys think about the condition of the plugs in the photos?

In the meantime I decided to drain the coolant since I hadn't done it since I've owned the car. It's one of those "while you're in there" decisions since some of the coolant drained while I replaced the coolant temp sensor. While draining it I noticed that the coolant tank was a little funky looking so I decided to pull it so could flush it out and clean it up a bit. Of course when disconnecting the coolant hose from the bottom of the tank it broke the hard plastic fitting that takes coolant to the heater core. Bonehead moment #2 and $40 to Alfissimo for a new "Reservoir to Water Rail Hose" P/N 60571390

Last, the mail arrived and with it came a new fuel pressure gauge kit. It has too many adapters that I'll probably never use but it was $35 on Amazon so I'm not mad. Once I have the car back together, filled with coolant and can start it up, I'll run the fuel pressure tests.
Take a deep breath and a break. Two bonehead moments in one day, time to stop and regroup. Check for the hoses that attach to the main intake. Those nipples are prone to crack on spider intakes. Check where the hose clamps squeeze . Micro cracks love to form there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
Read NGK link on how to regap Iridium plugs safely.


I was able to open the gap again and I'll go pick up a cheap gap tool next time I'm at O'Reillys but it may be worth just replacing all six plugs just to be sure. What do you guys think about the condition of the plugs in the photos?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
Did he have it in stock? Bonehead moment #2 and $40 to Alfissimo for a new "Reservoir to Water Rail Hose" P/N 60571390. Reservoir to Water Rail hose-Rear- 92-93

I repaired one of those on my 93 164L 12v with homemade new nipple to replace that short broken piece.
 

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo 164
Joined
·
42 Posts
Stirred a hornets nest with my comment on using carb cleaner. Still recommend it, good fast diagnosis tool used by older mechanics. Seen many weekend mechanics ( and also not so good tradesman mechanics) throw money and time away replacing near entire ignition components trying to cure an air leak problem. Common sense is required using this form of diagnosis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
[scatlin] "In the meantime I decided to drain the coolant since I hadn't done it since I've owned the car."

There are two drains on the side of the block, brass hex 22mm, you will get another c. 2-3 quarts (it's all the coolant around the piston sleeves). The front drain bolt is located near dipstick entry into sump, the rear next to the oil filter. Don't loose the sealing washers! Best tool is 3/8" drive breaker bar with 22mm socket (6-pt preferred), with extending pipe to give you more leverage. Rear is somewhat of a pain.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
7/8" socket same as 22mm, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
If you are still checking for fugitive air leaks, I have found that the rubber boots on the 6 intake runners often split on the bottom under the clamps and create air leaks. You can't see them unless you use a small dentist's mirror. The boots can look perfectly fine on top and on the sdies, but it's the bottom where they split. I spent many hours chasing air leaks on two different Alfa 164S' that both eventually turned out to have bad intake runner boots that had split on the bottom under the clamps on all six of the intake runners. Replaced the intake boots and all was well with the world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
Did he have it in stock? Bonehead moment #2 and $40 to Alfissimo for a new "Reservoir to Water Rail Hose" P/N 60571390. Reservoir to Water Rail hose-Rear- 92-93

I repaired one of those on my 93 164L 12v with homemade new nipple to replace that short broken piece.
It looks like Jason had one NOS in stock, but it may have been the last one. The website says Out of Stock now so I got lucky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
"I’ve been working on cars for 40+ years professionally."

I didn't know we had any young pups on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,018 Posts
I would replace those spark plugs, while you have them out and be done with them. Use a little anti -seize compound and be careful installing the new properly gapped plugs.

If your car has any bad motor mounts, you can rock the motor; now is the time to replace them too. My 'S' had a bad mount (lower rear) and during an 'Italian tune-up', the heater core ruptured releasing coolant mainly on the inside of the windshield. Apparently coolant made its way inside the wiper motor, which caused the wipers to 'self start'. Eventually the heater core and burned up wiper motor/rack assembly had to be replaced. I am not sure if the worn motor mount had anything to do with the failed heater core. The mechanic led me to believe it was a related failure. Unfortunately the replacement wiper motor/rack assembly does not operate nearly as smoothly as the original.

My intake bellows had a tear on the underside that allowed air to leak into the intake system, down stream of the MAF (Mass Air Flow sensor). The leak was self sealing at idle and low RPM/torque but opened up at higher RPM/torque as the engine rocked in its worn mounts. When the tear in the bellows opened up under engine load, air would enter the intake stream, short cutting the MAF. Because the MAF didn't measure air flow, it would cut off fuel to the injectors, causing the engine to produce a violent 'bucking' sensation.

Mark (aka 'Young Pup number two' I've only been turning wrenches on Alfas for 40 years too.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
I R [not] one of the much younger pups on here now but was so much older then in 1980 when I first went over to the Italian car scene after 24 years with Ford and GM body and engine combos. I bought my first Alfa 164 new in Feb 91 after wrenching and driving Fiats and Lancias for 11 years.

After re-Reading your post Ironblock John one thing I can say again and again "you can never have too many spare parts" can ya?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,072 Posts
Alfa wrenching since 1966. Morris and Austin BMC products before that.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top