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For the record and to be precise, I never ran at 0 pressure. It was a slow leak. I had it repaired way before I had a "flat".

If I had run at 0 pressure I don't believe I would be able to jack it up with the typical jack that would be in the trunk.
 

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Runflat tires must not be repaired. The stress on the tire carcass while running at zero pressure causes damage that cannot be assessed safely. You should change tire shops. Car jacks are designed to fit under a car with a flat tire. It would be pointless otherwise. If you lower your car then sure the factory jack might not work but otherwise they will always fit under the car no matter how flat the tire gets.
Not completely true. Different tire manufacturers have varying recommendations. Bridgestone allows repairs as long as pressure hasn't dropped below 15psi. Michelin and Goodyear both allow repairs, while Continental does not. Inspections and repairs must be made by dealers who have gone through a certification process. BUT there also prohibitions of runflat repairs by the automakers, notably BMW. So a lot depends on individual circumstances
 

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If a runflat tire is only run while not really fiat then sure. But that's true of ordinary tires. The difference is you can't really tell how flat your runflat got.

The problem is liability. To repair a runflat you have to be sure that its runflat capabilities have not been used. That is impossible. Even if you believe your customer one time and that time the customer lied or, more probably, had no idea how flat his runflat was. A subsequent buyer of the car has an accident involving that runflat and off we go down America's favourite litigation road.

It doesn't matter how flat your tire is the jack will still fit.
 

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That's apparently only included if you have standard tires. Versions with runflats appear to exclude the compressor. Ref:

Correct. I bought one because I am running PS4's. But I don't have it in the car. Last time I had a flat was maybe 29 years ago.
 

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Not completely true. Different tire manufacturers have varying recommendations. Bridgestone allows repairs as long as pressure hasn't dropped below 15psi. Michelin and Goodyear both allow repairs, while Continental does not. Inspections and repairs must be made by dealers who have gone through a certification process. BUT there also prohibitions of runflat repairs by the automakers, notably BMW. So a lot depends on individual circumstances
I do not think this is correct. Michelin actually does not recommend repairing any tire that has been driven on with zero pressure. No tire manufacturer approves of repairing a runflat that has been driven on at zero pressure (or with the TPMS warning light on) for more than a very short distance.
 

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I do not think this is correct. Michelin actually does not recommend repairing any tire that has been driven on with zero pressure. No tire manufacturer approves of repairing a runflat that has been driven on at zero pressure (or with the TPMS warning light on) for more than a very short distance.

What has this got to do with real world experience? I mean really, run flat means flat.

Please point us to the Michelin website where it states what they recommend.
 

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Sure


This is a well known deficiency of runflat tires.



This is why TPMS is required when runflats are fitted. In fact, this is why TPMS was developed. The average driver cannot tell if a runflat is underinflated. You have about 50 miles of driving before the runflat is dangerously damaged and can no longer be driven on. That's further than a regular tire of course but still practically useless where I drive.
 

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The logic is also straightforward. These runflats give you a maximum safe under pressure range of about 50 miles. So, let's say you run 20 miles before you repair the tire. Then you have 30 miles left if you get another puncture in that tire. Or do you? Can you know how many miles you use and how many you then have left? Did you run that tire for a few miles before you realized it was flat. Did you not pay attention to that TPMS warning for a few minutes? At highway speeds a few minutes is a few miles.

Tires, brakes, steering and suspension and seat belts. Don't try to save money on any of those components. Indeed, one of the reasons to pay a competent shop to do your annual oil change is to give an experienced mechanic the opportunity to inspect your car for the safety related components. Unless you have the knowledge to do this yourself, which I do but these days crawling under the car gets less and less appealing just to save a few bucks.
 
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