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Assuming I solve the SPICA rich/idling problem next spring, I will probably still be looking at overheating on my modified 1974 2000cc

Should I be ordering an aluminum radiator this winter? Will it require welding to attach fan tabs and (fan) temperature switch?

Still hoping to spend my budget on proper headers, rather than cooling . . .

Cheers!
 

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You could save some money and just have your stock radiator fitted with a larger capacity core. Good radiator shops do this all the time. It's a lot cheaper than buying an aluminum radiator.
 

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Wasn't true in my case with a '72 GTV 2000. The cost of a recore was only a few dollars less than a new aluminum radiator.

In 2012 my local shops wanted anywhere from $456 to $510 to recore my factory original radiator. I bought a custom made aluminum radiator for $495 plus shipping directly from Ron Davis (didn't go through an Alfa parts distributor). The aluminum radiator is dimensionally identical to factory radiator because they created a CAD drawing of the radiator I sent them. I could have gotten fancy, or gone with a more modern radiator design, but I was impatient.

I do live in a region of the country where shop rates are unusually high, and hazardous waste fees are onerous. So truly, YMMV.

Bob
 

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Hmmm. A new core is $300 at my local, old fashioned radiator shop. You have to look for these places because they are seldom located in areas were the major chains are located. Your experience may vary. :001_unsure:
 

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Interestingly, my new hot-rod 2 liter seems to work ok with my freshly rodded-out stock 1300 radiator. It routinely runs marginally hotter than the 1300 but not excessively so even when I was running it pretty hard doing the Hastings rings break-in (during F90+ temps, btw). I find that I have to turn on the electric fan more often but it always brings the temps back into the normal range. That, really, is the only real difference. I was thinking that I'd probably have to have it re-cored but perhaps not. I think one difference is that I fitted a Heyden 12in fan instead of the usual 10in fan.
 

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I wasn't aware that Engine Management included temperature management. Interesting interpretation.
Two separate issues I am sure. He probably knows this too but was just throwing out two cost concerns in one post. If his car is overheating I would hope he dials it down to the root cause before throwing money at a high capacity radiator. My car does not overheat now that I replaced the fan switch fuse but I would really like a quad core/high cap radiator just to be sure since I drive in Socal traffic.
 

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Modified or not these engines are not prone to overheating and do not require anything other than the stock radiator that they came with.
 

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When my 69 Super was new, like in 1970, I put a roll bar from a GTV in, a set of Konis and spent a summer of novice racing.

Recall one drive in Southern BC going up a long grade when the temp was close to 100. Any number of cars and pickups pulled over due to overheating.

I was moving along with speeds up to 90 +.

All without overheating.

Rad was new and the one in my current Super could be very old, so I'm putting in one with some 15 percent greater capacity than stock. Also less likely to leak.

:cool2::cool2:
 

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Well, no one has mentioned the tremendous weight saving afforded by an aluminum radiator.

My Ron Davis radiator was almost half the weight of the factory original. But then again my factory original was patched more than a few times. The only reason I was out shopping for a replacement radiator in 2012 was because my factory original sprung another leak. My car was not overheating. In theory and probably in practice copper alloy radiator are thermally more efficient than ones made from aluminum alloy of the same design.

Very much agree: find the root cause to the overheating; a leaking head gasket is not an uncommon problem and it will cause overheating.

Bob
 

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I would get your stock radiator cleaned/rodded first. These engines are not prone to overheating unless they have a clear problem. And Canada is not exactly the tropics.
 

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copper alloy radiator are thermally more efficient than one made from aluminum alloy of the same design
Right. Which makes you wonder why aluminum radiators are so highly valued.

As nunki also pointed out, aluminum is lighter, though the weight saving would be minimal. A slight increase in fluid volume would offset any weight savings.

Is it easier to make custom radiators from aluminum? That is, do you need high-cost tooling to form copper upper & lower tanks, while any backyard speed shop can heliarc aluminum tanks?

Are aluminum radiators stronger? If you're building a car for the Baja 1000, will welded aluminum take more pounding than soldered copper?
 

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I bought my Spider in almost perfect condition and the rad was good, because I never had a heating problem. The oil temp would rise a little on stop and go driving on a hot day.

In September, Super was running hot in heavy traffic at 90 F and it took a while to get out of it. Had to put the heater on.

When I bought it in June last year I had it reverse flushed, but did not get trapped in traffic on a hot day.

The new core is not any thicker than stock so the rad looks much the same as stock. The extra cooling capacity is due to larger coolant passages with "dimples" in the innards. This slows down coolant circulation allowing a better transfer of heat.

So I told them about the engineering of the air intake for cooling the rad of the P51 Mustang. The small leading scoop leads to a large space that holds a relatively deep radiator. The expansion lowers the speed of the air flow in order to enhance heat exchange. Of interest is that the heating of the air is sufficient to add a significant amount of thrust.

Heat in Canada? Have you ever been to Toronto in the summertime?

:cool2::cool2:
 

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Right. Which makes you wonder why aluminum radiators are so highly valued.

Well, they look cool and definitely increase your street cred. Of course no real Alfesti ever be influenced by such trivial concerns. Right? Right . . .? :balloon:
 

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One very important item that contributes to engine cooling at idle is the fan shroud. If that's missing, the fan can't pull the air through the radiator and instead comes from the sides.

If you're missing the shroud, get one.
 

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The Milano we have did overheat in the summer, but that was only in Phoenix stop and go driving with 110+ F temps. Had to turn the heater on and remove the front license plate. Removing that front plate did work well, as it tended to block some of the air going toward the radiator. I have now replaced the radiator after it started leaking a little. All Alfa spare Milano radiators are the Verde style.

The two GTV6's we had didn't have that problem, not sure why compared to the Milano. Better aerodynamics? Better radiator? The 164's we have don't overheat at all, even in the SW, including Texas in the summer.

Roadtrip is correct about the fan shroud. It is essential for best fan performance in slow or stop and go driving.
 

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My Milano got hot enough in stop and go with ambient temperature in the 90s that I would turn off the AC while stopped. A Verde radiator fixed that. I think the Nords are cooled adequately as I know guys that race with the stock radiator.
 
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