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Discussion Starter #1
Recently one of AlfaBB members (Bianchi as far as I remember) replaced his alfa alternator with some other one, I was considering the same, though befor I`ll do it, I want to ask if somebody has one laing around, and could take measurements of it for me, the ones that are interesting me the most are on the picture.
and please do not laugh too hard at me.
L=as a length of alternator`s body
D=as a diameter of alternator`s body
H=as a distance between two mounting points.
 

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what part?
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hi, i will take some mesurments sunday for you..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank you.
 

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FWIW, I've got a 3-liter Milano alternator on both my '74 and '87 Spiders, because of the extra output. Bolt-on swap, no issues, except on the '74 I was able to ditch the external VR. My '92 alternator seems to have a high enough output as is, but I haven't measured it with a meter.
 

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I used a Powermaster Alternator, from a Chevy (100 amp out, polished aluminum, $100).
 

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I used a Powermaster Alternator, from a Chevy (100 amp out, polished aluminum, $100).
Is that a straight bolt-in ?? Does it matter which one of the Powermaster Alternators?
 

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sorry, hero, work was very bussy today. i will get the diamentions for the ford escort alt. monday..sorry
 

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Discussion Starter #8
sorry, hero, work was very bussy today. i will get the diamentions for the ford escort alt. monday..sorry
Not a problem, take your time, I`m not in rush :)

Thank you.
 

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Is that a straight bolt-in ?? Does it matter which one of the Powermaster Alternators?
You need a 10mm spacer, but other than that, yes, direct bolt in...http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=PWM-27294&N=700+4294925143+4294839060+4294880793+400345+4294880741+4294880789+4294880774+4294908216+4294880775+4294880772+4294840140+4294880784+4294880695+115&autoview=sku
My, bad, $141, not $100...You'll also need a smaller belt size, I'll tell you that part number tomorrow when I can see out in the garage.
 

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What's holding the alternator in proper position to tension the belt? You don't just have it resting against the timing cover, or just held by the bottom pivot bolt, do you? I just can't tell from the pic you posted.
 

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You don't just have it resting against the timing cover, or just held by the bottom pivot bolt, do you?
Good eye Dean!! Yes and No! It's not actually touching the timing cover, although, you're not the first to ask that question, the picture is a little shady for that dimension. Yes, it is held in with just the bottom bolt. When I got the car, it didn't have the upper mount, the stud on the water pump was MIA, so not sure what the PO or his PO did with it, but you tension the belt and torque the bottom and she holds. One of these (once the other problems I'm having are fixed) I'll fabricate a tie-rod adjuster for it, just to finish it off for good.
 

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IMO, that's a bad idea, putting an awful lot of tension on the sand-cast aluminum timing cover. If you've ever held one, it feels as though it's made of papier-mache - very lightweight and flimsy. You might be lucky enough to get away with it, maybe even for a long time, but if you break that timing cover you'll be hurting. The timing cover is matched to the block, on a one-to-one basis at the factory, and you've got to pull both the head and sump to replace a broken timing cover. I'd fabricate a proper top tensioning bracket ASAP.
 

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If you've ever held one, it feels as though it's made of papier-mache - very lightweight and flimsy.
Back in the mid 90's I used to buy those kits, (you remember them?), you could buy a casing in chrome, upgraded bearings and internal regulator along with the diode trio-whatever happened to those? You are correct in light weight, not exactly flimsy, but not hardcore strength either-I know what you were saying
dwc said:
I'd fabricate a proper top tensioning bracket ASAP.
Not sure why the timing cover was being mentioned, are you saying the possibility of the casing breaking off and striking the timing cover? I'll be getting on the top bracket ASAP, the "as possible" end of that is the limiter...:eek:
Did find just one of those rebuild kits, they apparantly don't have the "Ice Burg" kits with the oversized bearings and heat sink with the rectifier bridge anymore:( http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=PWM-912&N=700+4294925143+4294839060+4294800943+115&autoview=sku
 

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I would be interested in the volts measurements coming off the 100 amp alt, I stuck a 164 115 amp alt in my Milano, and it made a huge difference, it was far from a direct swap, but still glad I did it. With stock alt, I was running 13.7 volts at idle with nothing on, with everything on, it dropped to 12.0 volts (less than battery output which is 12.6), after the swap, I had 14.3 at idle with nothing on and 13.3 volts at idle with everything on, 13.7 volts if I upped the rpms with everything on. I would like an easier swap for the GTV6 and Spider.
 

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I'm talking about the fragile nature of the timing cover, not the alternator case. The timing cover is not something you want to crack, and by not properly mounting the alternator, you're stressing the timing cover. Look at what where the alternator mounting boss is - bottom of the timing cover. FYI, it's not cast iron.
 

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Because of electrical problems on my spider, shortly after obtaining it 5 years ago, I installed both an ammeter and voltmeter. With an original/replacement alternator from IAP, so no fit problems, I've measured a consistent charging max of just over 30 amps above 2 grand, which gives 13.7 volts with not much load. The problem comes when the Hella lights, electric aftermarket radiator fan, and brake lights are all on at idle, when the charging rate falls to 15 amps, and the juice to 12 volts. But with a good solid battery, as long as idling isn't for a serious period -- which is not pleasant or good for humans or Alfas anyway -- that temporary drop is part of what a battery is for. So far it's carried me where I need to, with my high draw combination still carrying 13 volts at driving speed, as good as the RX7 does. I might think differently where there's a lot of rain, or other add ons, though, so appreciate hearing the alternative approaches.
 

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Look at what where the alternator mounting boss is - bottom of the timing cover.
Son of gun, your right, didn't notice, just that it was thick through there, so I should assume the thickness is hollow through there? Sincere question.
 

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Because of electrical problems on my spider, shortly after obtaining it 5 years ago, I installed both an ammeter and voltmeter. With an original/replacement alternator from IAP, so no fit problems, I've measured a consistent charging max of just over 30 amps above 2 grand, which gives 13.7 volts with not much load. The problem comes when the Hella lights, electric aftermarket radiator fan, and brake lights are all on at idle, when the charging rate falls to 15 amps, and the juice to 12 volts. But with a good solid battery, as long as idling isn't for a serious period -- which is not pleasant or good for humans or Alfas anyway -- that temporary drop is part of what a battery is for. So far it's carried me where I need to, with my high draw combination still carrying 13 volts at driving speed, as good as the RX7 does. I might think differently where there's a lot of rain, or other add ons, though, so appreciate hearing the alternative approaches.
Hi Terence:

As I mentioned, one option (the best, I think) is to simply buy a rebuilt alternator for a 3L Milano, and trade in your old 35 amp original (bring that core in a few days later). The larger capacity alternator bolts right on, and even looks original. The only differences will be the 75-amp output, and you can toss the original external voltage regulator and short harness that connected it to the alternator. You might also consider buying yourself a nice length (3-4 feet) of red #8 stranded copper wire, and a few ring terminals, to replace the original B+ wire from the alternator to the starter.

Your wipers will now work at full speed in the rain, you'll have a better defroster fan, brighter headlights, etc. Also, remember Ohm's law. If your accessories, such as fuel pump, wiper motor, etc. are running on 14 volts (as opposed to 12) they're drawing less current, and will operate at a lower temp and live longer. Not to mention, you'll always have a nice, fully-charged battery, which will also start the car faster, preserving the starter solenoid and motor, Spica cold-start solenoid, and perhaps the bearings in your engine. Better ignition, too. To the point, more volts are good.

Here's an appropriate alternator, just FYI:

http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductDetail.aspx?MfrCode=BAR&MfrPartNumber=1860435&PartType=11&PTSet=A
 
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