Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

As I'm reassembling the Alfetta, post-repaint, I'm finding (as expected) that the black trim has been faded by years of sun exposure, including:
- door handles
- front grills
- trunk button
- wipers & spray nozzles
- maybe the side marker lights...

Has anybody with a alfetta/gtv6 refurbished any of this trim, or simply replaced it with whatever NOS bits they could scrape together?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
There is also the Meguires I think, "Black Trim and Rubber", a gel that work's great.

For door handles, I know Re-Originals has them for like $500 each, ouch, or your balls! Re-chome or high end rattle can stuff!

Honestly, rattle can has come so far, I am a big believer for trim, wheels, etc.

Thoughts,

ncng
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
I used armorall...many times..last a few weeks

I think there is a good source for rubber if you need it...Mr Fiat near Atlanta?

re-originals can;t get the door handles anymore....too bad

there is a place in germany that bought up a bunch of Alfetta parts from my Italian source including door handles....Italian Autosport or something like that???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Whatever you do don't paint them black

Get the best black trim wax you can find and rub as much into the plastic you can over a few days.
The stuff is great but only lasts for so long in the sun, so I then clear coated it all with a clear flexible primer after rubbing off any excess. Good as new and will last forever
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
Whatever you do don't paint them black
Your reasoning please. This seems a reasonable approach.


italcarnut, xray:
Armorall? Anecdotes here on the BB have indicated less than desireable results with this product, some going so far as to suggest that it promotes cracking of dashes etc. Read these threads many moons ago so the links would take a bit of work to find. Other products were suggested (from Eastwood, SEM, others?).
For what it's worth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,854 Posts
Who ever told you that is ill informed. Armorall is one of the best protectants out there. I sold an Alfetta a few years back with a dash I have been babying with Armorall since 1980 an had no cracks. It looked like it just left the factory!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
No one 'told me' that. Opinions were from AlfaBB threads. Will try to find links when time allows.

I have used Armorall in the past. Never had a problem with it but does require regular applications.

Thank you for your inputs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I imagine the Armor All pros/cons will look very similar to the Great Internet Motor Oil debates of 1999 :p

I would probably not use it either way since it doesn't last long enough for this lazy @$$. Suggestions (if they exist) for a more permanent solution would be great, otherwise I'll probably use the Meguiar's silicone product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
I have had a bad experience with Armor All. It deteriorated my rubber and plastic components very rapidly over a couple of years of use. I was later told that it was silicon based and this destroys everything plastic/rubber. Thats just my experience and I'm sure that debate could go on for ever.

Rubbing Vaseline into things such as your dash board gives them a nice finish but I'm skeptical about it deteriorating plastic as well.

I no longer treat the plastic bits with anything choosing to just keep them clean with a damp cloth. Of course the sun kills everything.

With regard to the trim outside the car it would be great if some people have some suggestions because all to often you see the plastic bits and pieces painted gloss black and the paint subsequently coming off. I have to work out what to do with mine. With all the new paint products that have come into the ever increasing restoration business over the last 20 years there must be something that brings back the original finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
I have no problem with painting those details, if I were going to the trouble to go that far. You'll want to remove any past ArmorAll applications with a proper solvent, of course. To ensure the paint bonds well.

I have no problem with ArmorAll, either.

My reasoning for painting the details on a GTV6 (which has more cladding, and such, than an Alfetta Coupe), would be this:
The plastic and rubber trim can be made of varying polymers, and have different sun exposure depending on where they reside on the car. A 30 year old GTV6 will have a dozen different shades of black/greys on the trim. The vertical window channels don't match the bumper aprons, which don't match the tea tray, which don't match the rear side vents, which don't match the door guard trim, which don't match the windshield cowl grilles...

On my project GTV6, all the trim will match when I'm finished (paint). On my daily driver GTV, I can live with minimizing the patchwork fading (ArmorAll).

I do have a decent set of the slender door guard trim, that runs end-to-end along the most pronounced crease in the middle of the doors... if anyone has a need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #12

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Worth a try. We need someone in the industry to share some product secrets.
Also how does one remove paint from poorly painted plastic trim. I'm assuming paint stripper would melt the trim so I guess its paper and elbow grease?????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
Again, no expert here. But much of the trim on a GTV6 (air dam, rocker cladding, bumper aprons, and such, seems to be made of a Polyolefin, like Polypropylene, or an HD Polyethylene. Not sure this is true on parts like the rear side vents, or windshield cowls?

But battery casings are made of PP, and stand up to battery acid. However pine nut oil can attack it (the stuff you put on your salad)! So, those parts should withstand at least a milder solvent (not sure what a stronger Acetone might do?).

So, perhaps the wisest route would be to try a small patch on the backside of a panel to test. If you have a reject part hanging around, you could go nuts with the stronger variety of paint thinners and such. Knowing if the paint is enamel or lacquer would be a good start, too.

Sorry, if I'm just stating the obvious.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top